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  • Esarhaddon (king of Assyria)

    Esarhaddon, king of Assyria 680–669 bc, a descendant of Sargon II. Esarhaddon is best known for his conquest of Egypt in 671. Although he was a younger son, Esarhaddon had already been proclaimed successor to the throne by his father, Sennacherib, who had appointed him governor of Babylon some time

  • Esau (biblical figure)

    Esau, in the Old Testament (Genesis 25:19–34; 27; 28:6–9; 32:3–21; 33:1–16; 36), son of Isaac and Rebekah, elder twin brother of Jacob, and in Hebrew tradition the ancestor of the Edomites. At birth, Esau was red and hairy, and he became a wandering hunter, while Jacob was a shepherd. Although y

  • Esau, Katherine (American botanist)

    Katherine Esau, Russian-born American botanist who did groundbreaking work in the structure and workings of plants. Her Plant Anatomy is a classic in the field. Esau was born to a Mennonite family of German descent. When the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 cut short her agricultural studies in Moscow,

  • esbatement den appelboom, Het (Dutch play)

    morality play: In the Dutch play Het esbatement den appelboom (“The Miraculous Apple Tree”), for example, a pious couple, Staunch Goodfellow and Steadfast Faith, are rewarded when God creates for them an everbearing apple tree with the property that whoever touches it without permission becomes stuck fast. This leads to predictable…

  • Esbjerg (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, city, southwestern Jutland, Denmark, opposite Fan? island on the North Sea. Founded in 1868, after the loss of North Slesvig (Schleswig) to Germany, to provide a new export outlet for Jutland’s agricultural produce, it grew rapidly after the harbour was completed in 1874 and was chartered

  • Esbj?rn, Lars Paul (Swedish missionary)

    Augustana Evangelical Lutheran Church: …Andover, Illinois (1850), served by Lars P. Esbj?rn, the pioneer Swedish missionary pastor to the Swedish immigrants of the Midwest. Under the leadership of Esbj?rn and Hasselquist, many congregations were started, and Augustana College and Theological Seminary, in Rock Island, Illinois, was organized, with Esbj?rn as its first president.

  • Esbo (Finland)

    Espoo, city, southern Finland, just west of Helsinki, in a region of broad, flat valleys covered with low clay hills. It is located in an area that has been inhabited since 3500 bc. The city has railway connections to Helsinki and the remainder of Finland. It is a thriving technology centre where

  • ESC (biology)

    stem cell: Embryonic stem cells: Embryonic stem cells (often referred to as ES cells) are stem cells that are derived from the inner cell mass of a mammalian embryo at a very early stage of development, when it is composed of a hollow sphere of dividing cells…

  • ESCA

    surface analysis: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Since the binding energies of the electrons emitted through XPS are discrete and atoms of different elements have different characteristic electron-binding energies, the emitted electron beam can provide a simple method of elemental analysis. The specificity of XPS is very good, since…

  • esca (anatomy)

    paracanthopterygian: Life cycle and reproduction: …is a fleshy enlargement, the esca, used to lure prey within range of capture. (The illicium and esca are generally also present in male anglerfishes but do not appear in members of suborder Ceratioidei.) The esca is commonly luminous; the female also has other light-producing organs. In 1922 a specimen…

  • Escafeld (England, United Kingdom)

    Sheffield, town, city, and metropolitan borough, metropolitan county of South Yorkshire, north-central England. Sheffield lies about 160 miles (260 km) northwest of London. The city and metropolitan borough lie within the historic county of Yorkshire, except for the area around Beighton and

  • Escal-Vigor (work by Eekhoud)

    Georges Eekhoud: In the novel Escal-Vigor (1899; Escal-Vigor: A Strange Love), Eekhoud confronted his own homosexuality.

  • Escal-Vigor: A Strange Love (work by Eekhoud)

    Georges Eekhoud: In the novel Escal-Vigor (1899; Escal-Vigor: A Strange Love), Eekhoud confronted his own homosexuality.

  • Escalante River (river, Utah, United States)

    Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument: In the northeast, the Escalante River has cut deep into the sandstone over many millennia to create a tangle of interconnected, sometimes quite narrow, steep-sided canyons that provide a challenge for hikers.

  • Escalante, Francisco Silvestre Vélez de (Spanish explorer)

    Silvestre Vélez de Escalante, Spanish Franciscan missionary-explorer, who in 1776–77 with his superior Francisco Domínguez, while seeking a route to Monterey in California from Santa Fe (now in New Mexico), rediscovered the Grand Canyon (Arizona). He explored what is now western Colorado and made

  • Escalante, Silvestre Vélez de (Spanish explorer)

    Silvestre Vélez de Escalante, Spanish Franciscan missionary-explorer, who in 1776–77 with his superior Francisco Domínguez, while seeking a route to Monterey in California from Santa Fe (now in New Mexico), rediscovered the Grand Canyon (Arizona). He explored what is now western Colorado and made

  • Escalante, Tadeo (artist)

    Cuzco school: The work of Tadeo Escalante stands out as an example of the mestizo style. His murals of the Church of Huaro (1802), including a depiction of Hell, utilize Baroque dynamism at the same time that they freely interpret space and perspective.

  • escalated force (crowd control)

    police: Methods of crowd policing: …ancient strategy of crowd control, escalated force (the use of increasing amounts of force until the crowd disperses), still prevails in most countries that have not adopted Western-style democracy. Even in democracies, however, escalated force was the traditional way of controlling crowds until the 1970s, when the strategy of negotiated…

  • escalation (military)

    war: The control of war: …show a strong tendency to escalate. Thus, one state erects a tariff barrier to protect its industry against the competition of a trade partner, and the partner retaliates, the retaliatory interaction being repeated until the two countries find themselves in a trade war. Armaments races show a similar tendency to…

  • escalator (transportation)

    Escalator, moving staircase used as transportation between floors or levels in subways, buildings, and other mass pedestrian areas. An inclined belt, invented by Jesse W. Reno of the United States in 1891, provided transportation for passengers riding on cleats attached to the belt, which was

  • escalator clause (business and labour)

    Escalator clause, provision in union or business contracts for automatic adjustment of wages or prices in proportion to changes in an external standard, such as the U.S. cost of living index. Escalator clauses have been used most extensively since World War II. They are used in union contracts as a

  • Escalera Dorada (sculpture by Siloé)

    Diego de Siloé: His early masterpiece, the Escalera Dorada (Golden Staircase; 1519–23) in the Burgos Cathedral, combines both his sculptural and architectural gifts in a work of painted and gilded exuberance.

  • Escales (work by Ibert)

    Jacques Ibert: …popular work, the symphonic suite Escales (1922; “Ports of Call”). From 1937 until 1960 Ibert was director of the French Academy in Rome. He wrote for almost every genre. Of his seven operas the most successful was Angélique (1926). The brilliantly witty Divertissement (1930) was a popular orchestral piece.

  • Escalier Monumental (feature, Auch, France)

    Auch: …Place Salinis, from which the Monumental Steps (Escalier Monumental) lead down to the river.

  • Escallonia (plant genus)

    Escallonia, genus of South American evergreen trees and shrubs in the family Grossulariaceae, order Rosales, comprising about 50 species. Members of the genus are found mainly in mountainous areas—notably in the Andes Mountains—although species in the temperate, southernmost portions of the range

  • Escalloniales (plant order)

    angiosperm: Annotated classification: Order Escalloniales Family: Escalloniaceae. Order Paracryphiales Family: Paracryphiaceae. Assorted Referencesannotated classifications

  • escallop (bivalve)

    Scallop, any of the marine bivalve mollusks of the family Pectinidae, particularly species of the genus Pecten. The family, which includes about 50 genera and subgenera and more than 400 species, is worldwide in distribution and ranges from the intertidal zone to considerable ocean depths. The two

  • Escalona Martínez, Rafael Calixto (Colombian folk-song composer)

    Rafael Calixto Escalona Martínez, Colombian folk-song composer (born May 27, 1927, Patillal, Colom.—died May 13, 2009, Bogotá, Colom.), was celebrated in Colombia as “el maestro” of the vallenato, an accordion-based folk music that originated in the country’s Caribbean coastal region and that

  • escalope (meat)

    veal: Scallops, small thin slices—called scallopine in Italy and escalopes or médaillons in France—may be cooked in wine or other sauces.

  • Escalus (fictional character)

    Measure for Measure: …careful supervision of the magistrate Escalus. Vincentio asks Isabella to give up her idea of being a nun in order to become his wife. (Whether she accepts is today a matter of theatrical choice.)

  • Escanaba (Michigan, United States)

    Escanaba, city, seat (1861) of Delta county, southern Upper Peninsula of Michigan, U.S. It is a port on Little Bay de Noc, an inlet of Green Bay, about 55 miles (90 km) north-northeast of Menominee. Lumber operations began there in the 1830s. The community, whose name was derived from an Ojibwa

  • ESCAP (UN)

    United Nations: Economic reconstruction: …Commission for Europe and the Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East. Similar commissions were established for Latin America in 1948 and for Africa in 1958. The major work of economic reconstruction, however, was delegated to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (World Bank), one of the major…

  • Escapade (film by Leonard [1935])

    Robert Z. Leonard: Dancing Lady to Ziegfeld Girl: Escapade (1935), however, was more successful. The comedy, which was set in prewar Vienna, featured Luise Rainer, in her Hollywood debut, opposite William Powell. Next was The Great Ziegfeld (1936), Leonard’s best and biggest hit. The lavish biopic of flamboyant showman Flo Ziegfeld starred MGM’s…

  • Escape at Dannemora (American television miniseries)

    Patricia Arquette: …break out in the miniseries Escape at Dannemora (2018), which was based on true events. For her performance, Arquette won a second Golden Globe Award. In 2019 she assumed another real-life disquieting figure for The Act, a limited series in which she played an abusive mother who submits her daughter…

  • escape behaviour (psychology)

    Avoidance behaviour, type of activity, seen in animals exposed to adverse stimuli, in which the tendency to act defensively is stronger than the tendency to attack. The underlying implication that a single neural mechanism is involved (such as a specific part of the brain, which, under electrical

  • escape device (law)

    conflict of laws: Historical development: …parties resorted to so-called “escape devices” that yielded better, more appropriate results. Among these is the recharacterization of a set of facts—e.g., the recasting of a question of contract as a tort or a tort question as one of family law. For example, what law governs the question of…

  • Escape From Alcatraz (film by Siegel [1979])

    Don Siegel: Films with Eastwood: Escape from Alcatraz (1979) was stronger, a prime vehicle for Eastwood based on real-life inmate Frank Morris’s 1962 escape from the prison on Alcatraz Island. Although perhaps longer than necessary, the film gains power from its starkness. Siegel’s final two films were box-office failures. In…

  • Escape from Fort Bravo (film by Sturges [1953])

    John Sturges: Bad, Magnificent, and Great: Escape from Fort Bravo (1953), however, was better, a solid western about the U.S. cavalry battling Native Americans; it starred William Holden and Eleanor Parker.

  • Escape from Freedom (work by Fromm)

    Erich Fromm: In Fromm’s first major work, Escape from Freedom (1941), he charted the growth of freedom and self-awareness from the Middle Ages to modern times and, using psychoanalytic techniques, analyzed the tendency, brought on by modernization, to take refuge from contemporary insecurities by turning to totalitarian movements such as Nazism. In…

  • Escape from Planet Earth (film by Brunker [2013])

    Sarah Jessica Parker: …an alien in the animated Escape from Planet Earth (2013). Parker later returned to HBO with a starring role in the comedy series Divorce(2016–19), in which she played a wife and mother who decides to end her marriage.

  • Escape Hybrid (sports utility vehicle)

    automobile: Electric-gasoline hybrids: In 2004 the Ford Escape Hybrid (SUV) became the first American hybrid, beating two General Motors trucks, the Chevrolet Silverado and the GMC Sierra, to market by one year. The first luxury hybrid vehicle, the Lexus RX 400h, was released in 2005. In 2010 General Motors introduced the Chevrolet…

  • Escape Me Never (play and film)

    Elisabeth Bergner: …there as Gemma Jones in Escape Me Never (1933) was met with great enthusiasm, and she repeated the role in New York City (1935) and again for the film version that was directed by Czinner (1935); the latter performance garnered her an Academy Award nomination. Other English-language films of Bergner’s…

  • Escape Plan (film by Hafstr?m [2013])

    Arnold Schwarzenegger: …Stallone in the action thriller Escape Plan (2013), took top billing in the action drama Sabotage (2014), and reprised his Terminator role in Terminator Genisys (2015) and Terminator: Dark Fate (2019).

  • Escape to Nowhere (film by Spielberg [1962])

    Steven Spielberg: Early life and work: …and during his teens his Escape to Nowhere (1962), a 40-minute war movie, won first prize at a film festival. He next directed Firelight (1964), a feature-length science-fiction yarn, which was followed by an accomplished short about hitchhikers called Amblin’ (1968). An executive at Universal Studios saw the latter film…

  • escape velocity (physics)

    Escape velocity, in astronomy and space exploration, the velocity that is sufficient for a body to escape from a gravitational centre of attraction without undergoing any further acceleration. Escape velocity decreases with altitude and is equal to the square root of 2 (or about 1.414) times the

  • Escape Velocity: A Charles Portis Miscellany (work by Portis)

    Charles Portis: Escape Velocity: A Charles Portis Miscellany (2012) contains various writings, including essays and short fiction. Throughout his oeuvre, Portis portrayed the restless pursuit of belief or adventure as emblematic of the American character.

  • escape warrant (law)

    warrant: Other judicial warrants include escape warrants, issued for the recapture of escaped prisoners, and warrants of commitment, issued to incarcerate a prisoner either before or after trial.

  • escape wheel (horology)

    Big Ben: In a pendulum clock an escape wheel is allowed to rotate through the pitch of one tooth for each double swing of the pendulum and to transmit an impulse to the pendulum to keep it swinging. An ideal escapement would transmit the impulse without interfering with the free swing, and…

  • Escape; or, A Leap for Freedom, The (play by Brown)

    black theatre: William Wells Brown’s The Escape; or, A Leap for Freedom (1858), was the first black play published, but the first real success of a black dramatist was Angelina W. Grimké’s Rachel (1916).

  • escapement (mechanics)

    Escapement, in mechanics, a device that permits controlled motion, usually in steps. In a watch or clock, it is the mechanism that controls the transfer of energy from the power source to the counting mechanism. The classic form for a timepiece, which made the mechanical clock possible, was the

  • escargot (game)

    hopscotch: …(this variant is known as escargot in France, for the spiral of the snail shell), in which players hop on one foot to a central rest spot and then back out again. Each player who succeeds may initial a space. The game continues until it becomes impossible to reach the…

  • Escargot entêté, L’? (novel by Boudjedra)

    Rachid Boudjedra: In L’Escargot entêté (1977; The Obstinate Snail), a petty bureaucrat exposes his mediocre life and values, symbolizing the incompleteness of the Algerian revolution. With Les 1001 Années de la nostalgie (1979; “1,001 Years of Nostalgia”), Boudjedra created a satire of an imaginary Saharan village confronted with what he viewed…

  • escarpment (oceanography)

    continental slope: …at all and are called escarpments.

  • escarpment (geology)

    Mercury: Basin and surrounding region: …a relatively steep slope, or escarpment. A second, much smaller escarpment ring stands about 100–150 km (60–90 miles) beyond the first. Smooth plains occupy the depressions between mountain blocks. Beyond the outer escarpment is a zone of linear, radial ridges and valleys that are partially filled by plains, some with…

  • Escarva Isaura (Brazilian television program)

    telenovela: The Brazilian telenovela Escarva Isaura, a 1970s program about a slave working on a 19th-century Brazilian coffee plantation, also attracted large audiences, though the fact that it and other Brazilian programs were taped in Portuguese limited their distribution throughout the rest of Latin America.

  • Escaut River (river, Europe)

    Schelde River, river, 270 miles (435 km) long, that rises in northern France and flows across Belgium to its North Sea outlet in Dutch territory. Along with the Lower Rhine and the Meuse rivers, it drains one of the world’s most densely populated areas. As a waterway, with its numerous branch

  • escena contemporánea, La (work by Mariátegui)

    José Carlos Mariátegui: In essays in La escena contemporánea (1925; “The Contemporary Scene”), Mariátegui attacked fascism and defined the responsibilities of the intellectual in countries where social oppression reigns. César Vallejo, Peru’s greatest poet, was deeply influenced by him.

  • Escenas (album by Blades)

    Rubén Blades: …Grammy Award for his album Escenas, in which Linda Ronstadt joined him in a Spanish duet, and the following year he released his first English-language album, Nothing but the Truth, which featured songs written or cowritten by Lou Reed, Elvis Costello, and Sting. His music echoed such social issues as…

  • Escenas monta?esas (work by Pereda)

    José María de Pereda: …first literary effort was the Escenas monta?esas (1864), starkly realistic sketches of the fisherfolk of Santander and the peasants of the Monta?a. There followed other sketches and early novels of pronounced controversial spirit, such as El buey suelto (1878; “The Unfettered Ox”); Don Gonzalo González de la Gonzalera (1879), a…

  • Esch oder die Anarchie 1903 (novel by Broch)

    The Sleepwalkers: …oder die Anarchie 1903 (1931; The Anarchist), and Huguenau oder die Sachlichkeit 1918 (1932; The Realist).

  • Esch-Cummins Act (United States [1920])

    Albert Baird Cummins: In 1920 the Esch-Cummins Act provided for the return of the railroads to private control—after their government operation during the war—but did not include Cummins’ plan for consolidation of the roads into a few national, truly competitive companies. His last years were embittered by the rebellion of his…

  • Esch-sur-Alzette (Luxembourg)

    Esch-sur-Alzette, town, southern Luxembourg, on the upper Alzette River, southwest of Luxembourg city, near the French border. A small village until 1870, it eventually became the second largest town in Luxembourg, largely because of the local phosphoric iron ore, and the centre of the country’s

  • Eschagüe, Pascual (Argentine politician)

    Justo José de Urquiza: …Aires as the agent of Pascual Eschagüe, the governor of Entre Ríos. In the capital Urquiza became a confidant of the dictator Rosas. Made a colonel in 1837, he replaced his patron Eschagüe as governor of Entre Ríos in 1841.

  • eschallot (organ pipe)

    keyboard instrument: Reed pipes: The shallot of a beating reed pipe is roughly cylindrical in shape, with its lower end closed and the upper end open. A section of the wall of the cylinder is cut away and finished off to a flat surface. The slit, or shallot opening, thus…

  • eschar (glacial landform)

    Esker, a long, narrow, winding ridge composed of stratified sand and gravel deposited by a subglacial or englacial meltwater stream. Eskers may range from 16 to 160 feet (5 to 50 m) in height, from 160 to 1,600 feet (500 m) in width, and a few hundred feet to tens of miles in length. They may occur

  • eschar (medicine)

    burn: Hospital treatment.: …the overlying dead skin, or eschar. The goal of exposure therapy is to soften the eschar and remove it. Exposure allows the eschar to dry. After it dries, saline-soaked gauzes are applied to the eschar to soften it and hasten its spontaneous separation from the underlying tissues. The advantage of…

  • eschatological dualism (religion)

    dualism: Nature and significance: …is that between dialectical and eschatological dualism. Dialectical dualism involves an eternal dialectic, or tension, of two opposed principles, such as, in Western culture, the One and the many, or Idea and matter (or space, called by Plato “the receptacle”), and, in Indian culture, maya (the illusory world of sense…

  • eschatology (religion)

    Eschatology, the doctrine of the last things. It was originally a Western term, referring to Jewish, Christian, and Muslim beliefs about the end of history, the resurrection of the dead, the Last Judgment, the messianic era, and the problem of theodicy (the vindication of God’s justice). Historians

  • escheat (law)

    Escheat, in feudal English land law, the return or forfeiture to the lord of land held by his tenant. There were generally two conditions by which land would escheat: the death of the tenant without heirs or the conviction of the tenant for a felony. In case of felony, the land would lose its

  • Eschenbach, Christoph (German-born musician and conductor)

    National Symphony Orchestra: …1994–96; music director, 1996–2008), and Christoph Eschenbach (2010–17). Gianandrea Noseda assumed the music directorship in 2017.

  • Eschenbach, Wolfram von (German poet)

    Wolfram von Eschenbach, German poet whose epic Parzival, distinguished alike by its moral elevation and its imaginative power, is one of the most profound literary works of the Middle Ages. An impoverished Bavarian knight, Wolfram apparently served a succession of Franconian lords: Abensberg,

  • Eschenheimer Tower (tower, Frankfurt am Main, Germany)

    Frankfurt am Main: The contemporary city: …include the 155-foot- (47-metre-) tall Eschenheimer Tower (1400–28); the red sandstone cathedral, which was dedicated to St. Bartholomew in 1239; and the Paulskirche, which was the meeting place of the first Frankfurt National Assembly.

  • Escher von der Linth, Hans Conrad (Swiss statesman)

    Hans Conrad Escher, Swiss scientist and politician who was president of the Great Council of the Helvetic Republic (1798–99) and who was an outspoken opponent of federalism. He directed the canalization of the Linth River. With his friend and political colleague Paul Usteri, Escher founded the

  • Escher, Alfred (Swiss statesman)

    Alfred Escher, dominant figure in 19th-century Zürich politics and legislator of national prominence who, as a railway magnate, became a leading opponent of railway nationalization. Quickly rising in cantonal political affairs, Escher had by 1848 become president of the Zürich government. Elected

  • Escher, Han Conrad (Swiss statesman)

    Hans Conrad Escher, Swiss scientist and politician who was president of the Great Council of the Helvetic Republic (1798–99) and who was an outspoken opponent of federalism. He directed the canalization of the Linth River. With his friend and political colleague Paul Usteri, Escher founded the

  • Escher, M. C. (Dutch artist)

    M.C. Escher, Dutch graphic artist known for his detailed realistic prints that achieve bizarre optical and conceptual effects. Maurits Cornelis Escher was the youngest of five boys and was raised by his father, George Escher, a civil engineer, and his father’s second wife, Sarah Gleichman. Maurits

  • Escher, Maurits Cornelis (Dutch artist)

    M.C. Escher, Dutch graphic artist known for his detailed realistic prints that achieve bizarre optical and conceptual effects. Maurits Cornelis Escher was the youngest of five boys and was raised by his father, George Escher, a civil engineer, and his father’s second wife, Sarah Gleichman. Maurits

  • Escher, Rudolf (Dutch composer)

    Rudolf Escher, Dutch composer and music theoretician especially noted for his chamber works. Escher studied at the Rotterdam Conservatory from 1931 to 1937, but most of his early compositions were lost in the bombing of Rotterdam during World War II. During 1945 and 1946 he worked as a music editor

  • Escher, Rudolf George (Dutch composer)

    Rudolf Escher, Dutch composer and music theoretician especially noted for his chamber works. Escher studied at the Rotterdam Conservatory from 1931 to 1937, but most of his early compositions were lost in the bombing of Rotterdam during World War II. During 1945 and 1946 he worked as a music editor

  • Escherich, Theodor (Austrian pediatrician)

    human microbiome: Discovery of the human microbiome: …the mid-1880s, when Austrian pediatrician Theodor Escherich observed a type of bacteria (later named Escherichia coli) in the intestinal flora of healthy children and children affected by diarrheal disease. In the years that followed, scientists described a number of other microorganisms isolated from the human body, including in 1898 the…

  • Escherichia coli (bacteria)

    E. coli, (Escherichia coli), species of bacterium that normally inhabits the stomach and intestines. When E. coli is consumed in contaminated water, milk, or food or is transmitted through the bite of a fly or other insect, it can cause gastrointestinal illness. Mutations can lead to strains that

  • eschiquier (musical instrument)

    keyboard instrument: The clavichord: …when an instrument called the eschiquier was mentioned in account books of John II the Good, king of France. The eschiquier was described in 1388 as “resembling an organ that sounds by means of strings.” There exists no more complete description of the eschiquier, however, and it is not known…

  • Escholtz Atoll (atoll, Marshall Islands)

    Bikini, an atoll in the Ralik (western) chain of the Marshall Islands in the central Pacific Ocean. The atoll was used for peacetime atomic explosions conducted for experimental purposes by the United States between 1946 and 1958. Lying north of the Equator, Bikini is 225 miles (360 km) northwest

  • Eschrichtiidae (baleen whale family)

    cetacean: Annotated taxonomy: Family Eschrichtiidae (gray whale) 1 species. Formerly Rhachianectidae. Head less than one-quarter of total length; neck vertebrae not fused. Dorsal fin lacking. Flippers with 4 internal digits. Length to about 15 metres. Found along both coasts of the North Pacific Ocean. Exterminated in the Atlantic Ocean…

  • Eschrichtius gibbosus (mammal)

    Gray whale, (Eschrichtius robustus), a slender baleen whale having a profusion of external parasites that give it the appearance of a barnacle-encrusted rock. The gray whale attains a maximum length of about 15 metres (49 feet). It is gray or black, mottled with white, and has short yellow baleen

  • Eschrichtius glaucus (mammal)

    Gray whale, (Eschrichtius robustus), a slender baleen whale having a profusion of external parasites that give it the appearance of a barnacle-encrusted rock. The gray whale attains a maximum length of about 15 metres (49 feet). It is gray or black, mottled with white, and has short yellow baleen

  • Eschrichtius robustus (mammal)

    Gray whale, (Eschrichtius robustus), a slender baleen whale having a profusion of external parasites that give it the appearance of a barnacle-encrusted rock. The gray whale attains a maximum length of about 15 metres (49 feet). It is gray or black, mottled with white, and has short yellow baleen

  • Eschscholzia californica (plant)

    California poppy, (Eschscholzia californica), plant of the poppy family (Papaveraceae), native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. It has become naturalized in parts of southern Europe, Asia, and Australia. Depending on conditions, California poppies flower from February to

  • Eschu (Yoruba deity)

    Eshu, trickster god of the Yoruba of Nigeria, an essentially protective, benevolent spirit who serves Ifa, the chief god, as a messenger between heaven and earth. Eshu requires constant appeasement in order to carry out his assigned functions of conveying sacrifices and divining the future. One

  • Esclavo, El (Spanish painter)

    Juan de Pareja, Spanish painter and student of Diego Velázquez. Pareja was initially Velázquez’s slave and assisted the artist in his studio. Pareja accompanied Velázquez on his second visit to Italy (1649–51), where Velázquez painted Pareja’s portrait. The portrait was purchased at auction by the

  • ésclavos felices, Los (work by Arriaga)

    Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga: …the success of his opera Los ésclavos felices (“The Happy Slaves”; produced 1820, Bilbao), Arriaga enrolled in the Paris Conservatory, where by age 18 he became an assistant professor. His other compositions include three string quartets and a symphony.

  • Escluse, Charles de l’ (French botanist)

    Carolus Clusius, botanist who contributed to the establishment of modern botany. He was best known by the Latin version of his name, Carolus Clusius. He developed new cultivated plants, such as the tulip, potato, and chestnut, from other parts of the world. From 1573 to 1587 he was the director of

  • Escobar Bethancourt, Rómulo (Panamanian politician)

    Rómulo Escobar Bethancourt, Panamanian politician (born Sept. 5, 1927, Panama City, Panama—died Sept. 28, 1995, Panama City), as chief negotiator for the 1977 Panama Canal Treaties, helped his country regain control of the Canal Zone and partial ownership of canal operations, with an agreement to a

  • Escobar Gaviria, Pablo Emilio (Colombian criminal)

    Pablo Escobar, Colombian criminal who, as head of the Medellín cartel, was arguably the world’s most powerful drug trafficker in the 1980s and early ’90s. Soon after his birth, Escobar’s family moved to Envigado, Colombia, a suburb of Medellín. While still a teenager, he began a life of crime. His

  • Escobar y Mendoza, Antonio (Spanish theologian)

    Antonio Escobar y Mendoza, Spanish Jesuit preacher and moral theologian who was derided for his support of probabilism, the theory according to which when the rightness or wrongness of a course of action is in doubt, any probable right course may be followed, even if an opposed course appears more

  • Escobar, Marisol (American sculptor)

    Marisol, American sculptor of boxlike figurative works combining wood and other materials and often grouped as tableaux. She rose to fame during the 1960s and all but disappeared from art history until the 21st century. Marisol was born in Paris of Venezuelan parents and spent her youth in Los

  • Escobar, Pablo (Colombian criminal)

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  • Escobedo v. Illinois (law case)

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