You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • epistratēgoi (ancient Egyptian official)

    ancient Egypt: Administration and economy under Rome: There were three or four epistratēgoi in charge of regional subdivisions; special officers were in charge of the emperors’ private account, the administration of justice, religious institutions, and so on. Subordinate to them were the local officials in the nomes (stratēgoi and royal scribes) and finally the authorities in the…

  • epistratēgus (ancient Egyptian official)

    ancient Egypt: Administration and economy under Rome: There were three or four epistratēgoi in charge of regional subdivisions; special officers were in charge of the emperors’ private account, the administration of justice, religious institutions, and so on. Subordinate to them were the local officials in the nomes (stratēgoi and royal scribes) and finally the authorities in the…

  • épistre au Dieu d’amours, L’? (work by Christine de Pisan)

    Christine de Pisan: …10 volumes in verse, including L’épistre au Dieu d’amours (1399; “Letter to the God of Loves”), in which she defended women against the satire of Jean de Meun in the Roman de la rose.

  • Epistula ad Pisones (work by Horace)

    Ars poetica, (Latin: “Art of Poetry”) work by Horace, written about 19–18 bce for Piso and his sons and originally known as Epistula ad Pisones (Epistle to the Pisos). The work is an urbane, unsystematic amplification of Aristotle’s discussion of the decorum or internal propriety of each literary

  • Epistula Apostolorum (biblical literature)

    biblical literature: Letters: …apocryphal letters are: a 2nd-century Epistula Apostolorum (“Epistle of the Apostles”; actually apocalyptic and antiheretical), the Letter of Barnabas, a lost Letter of Paul to the Alexandrians (said to have been forged by followers of Marcion), the late 2nd-century letter called “III Corinthians” (part of the Acts of Paul and…

  • Epistulae ex Ponto (work by Ovid)

    Ovid: Works: The Tristia and Epistulae ex Ponto were written and sent to Rome at the rate of about a book a year from 9 ce on. They consist of letters to the emperor and to Ovid’s wife and friends describing his miseries and appealing for clemency. For all his…

  • Epistulae morales (work by Seneca the Younger)

    Seneca: Philosophical works and tragedies: …Ad Lucilium epistulae morales (Moral Letters to Lucilius). Those 124 brilliant essays treat a range of moral problems not easily reduced to a single formula.

  • Epitafios (work by Ritsos)

    Yannis Ritsos: His next collection, Epitafios (1936; “Funeral Lament”), was symbolically burned at the foot of the Acropolis, and for nearly a decade he could not publish freely. During the Nazi occupation of Greece (1944) and the start of the civil war, Ritsos joined with the Communist guerrillas; after their…

  • Epitaph (work by Mingus)

    jazz: The mainstream enlarged: Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Charles Mingus, and others: …the monumental two-and-a-half-hour, posthumously premiered Epitaph. Accumulated between the early 1940s and 1962 and composed for 31 instruments, Epitaph is a gigantic summation of everything Mingus felt and heard in music, from the gentlest lyric ballads and earthy blues to the most complex and advanced Ivesian and Stravinskian orchestral excursions.

  • epitaph (poetic form)

    Epitaph, an inscription in verse or prose upon a tomb; and, by extension, anything written as if to be inscribed on a tomb. Probably the earliest surviving are those of the ancient Egyptians, written on the sarcophagi and coffins. Ancient Greek epitaphs are often of considerable literary interest,

  • Epitaph of a Small Winner (work by Machado)

    Brazilian literature: Emergence of the republic: …of the Brazilian novel with Memórias póstumas de Brás Cubas (1881; “The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas”; Eng. trans. Epitaph of a Small Winner), the capricious upper-class cynical and intrusive narrator of which speaks from the grave, and with Dom Casmurro (1899; Eng. trans. Dom Casmurro), a fictional autobiography by…

  • épitaphe Villon, L’? (poem by Villon)

    Fran?ois Villon: Life: …he wrote his superb “Ballade des pendus,” or “L’épitaphe Villon”, in which he imagines himself hanging on the scaffold, his body rotting, and he makes a plea to God against the “justice” of men. At this time, too, he wrote his famous wry quatrain “Je suis Fran?oys, dont il…

  • epitaphion (speech)

    panegyric: Akin to panegyric was the epitaphion, or funeral oration, such as Pericles’ funeral speech as recorded by Thucydides, a panegyric both on war heroes and on Athens itself.

  • Epitaphium Damonis (poem by Milton)

    John Milton: Travel abroad: …an elegy in Latin, “Epitaphium Damonis” (“Damon’s Epitaph”), which commemorated Diodati.

  • epitaxial growth (crystallography)

    Epitaxy, the process of growing a crystal of a particular orientation on top of another crystal, where the orientation is determined by the underlying crystal. The creation of various layers in semiconductor wafers, such as those used in integrated circuits, is a typical application for the

  • epitaxial layer (crystallography)

    materials science: Epitaxial layers: For the efficient emission or detection of photons, it is often necessary to constrain these processes to very thin semiconductor layers. These thin layers, grown atop bulk semiconductor wafers, are called epitaxial layers because their crystallinity matches that of the substrate even though…

  • epitaxy (crystallography)

    Epitaxy, the process of growing a crystal of a particular orientation on top of another crystal, where the orientation is determined by the underlying crystal. The creation of various layers in semiconductor wafers, such as those used in integrated circuits, is a typical application for the

  • epithalamion (wedding lyric)

    Epithalamium, song or poem to the bride and bridegroom at their wedding. In ancient Greece, the singing of such songs was a traditional way of invoking good fortune on the marriage and often of indulging in ribaldry. By derivation, the epithalamium should be sung at the marriage chamber; but the

  • Epithalamion (poem by Spenser)

    Epithalamion, marriage ode by Edmund Spenser, originally published with his sonnet sequence Amoretti in 1595. The poem celebrates Spenser’s marriage in 1594 to his second wife, Elizabeth Boyle, and it may have been intended as a culmination of the sonnets of Amoretti. Taken as a whole, the group of

  • Epithalamium (work by Buchanan)

    George Buchanan: …poem in five books, and Epithalamium (1558), a poem on the marriage of Mary, Queen of Scots, to the French dauphin, he returned to Scotland in 1561. At first a supporter of Mary, he became her bitter enemy after the murder of her second husband, Lord Darnley, in 1567. He…

  • epithalamium (wedding lyric)

    Epithalamium, song or poem to the bride and bridegroom at their wedding. In ancient Greece, the singing of such songs was a traditional way of invoking good fortune on the marriage and often of indulging in ribaldry. By derivation, the epithalamium should be sung at the marriage chamber; but the

  • epithalamus (anatomy)

    forebrain: hypothalamus, epithalamus, and subthalamus. The forebrain plays a central role in the processing of information related to complex cognitive activities, sensory and associative functions, and voluntary motor activities. It represents one of the three major developmental divisions of the brain; the other two are the midbrain…

  • epithalamy (wedding lyric)

    Epithalamium, song or poem to the bride and bridegroom at their wedding. In ancient Greece, the singing of such songs was a traditional way of invoking good fortune on the marriage and often of indulging in ribaldry. By derivation, the epithalamium should be sung at the marriage chamber; but the

  • epithelial mesothelioma (pathology)

    mesothelioma: Diagnosis and subtypes of mesothelioma: The most common subtype is epithelial mesothelioma, followed by biphasic, or mixed, disease, which has epithelial and sarcomatous (connective tissue) involvement; less common is the solely sarcomatoid subtype. The pathologic diagnosis of mesothelioma, using microscopic techniques, can be difficult and often requires that a battery of immunohistochemistry (IHC) tests be…

  • epithelial papilloma (pathology)

    nasal tumour: Epithelial papilloma is one of the more common benign nasal tumours. It affects the nasal mucous membrane and is composed of tall column-shaped cells, mucous cells, which have small hairlike structures called cilia. The tumour grows in small nipplelike protrusions. Nasal carcinoma, a malignant growth, also…

  • epithelial stem cell (biology)

    stem cell: Epithelial stem cells: The epidermis of the skin contains layers of cells called keratinocytes. Only the basal layer, next to the dermis, contains cells that divide. A number of these cells are stem cells, but the majority are transit amplifying cells. The keratinocytes slowly move…

  • epitheliochorial placenta (zoology)

    artiodactyl: Reproductive specializations: Hippopotamuses and pigs have an epitheliochorial placenta, a layer of fetal tissue merely pressed close against the uterus wall, but camels and ruminants possess a syndesmochorial placenta, in which the epithelium of the maternal tissues is eroded to facilitate intercommunication. This is an advance over the epitheliochorial placenta, but the…

  • epithelioma (pathology)

    Epithelioma, an abnormal growth, or tumour, of the epithelium, the layer of tissue (such as the skin or mucous membrane) that covers the surfaces of organs and other structures of the body. Epitheliomas can be benign or malignant (that is, cancerous), and there are various types depending on the

  • epithelium (anatomy)

    Epithelium, in anatomy, layer of cells closely bound to one another to form continuous sheets covering surfaces that may come into contact with foreign substances. Epithelium occurs in both plants and animals. In animals, outgrowths or ingrowths from these surfaces form structures consisting

  • epithermal deposit (geology)

    mineral deposit: Veins: …are commonly referred to as epithermal, a term retained from an old system of classifying hydrothermal deposits based on the presumed temperature and depth of deposition. Epithermal veins tend not to have great vertical continuity, but many are exceedingly rich and deserving of the term bonanza. Many of the famous…

  • epithet (literature)

    Epithet, adjective or phrase that is used to express a characteristic of a person or thing, such as Ivan the Terrible. In literature, the term is considered an element of poetic diction, something that distinguishes the language of poetry from ordinary language. Homer used certain epithets so

  • Epitia (work by Giraldi)

    Measure for Measure: Shakespeare adapted the story from Epitia, a tragedy by Italian dramatist Giambattista Giraldi (also called Cinthio), and especially from a two-part play by George Whetstone titled Promos and Cassandra (1578).

  • epitoke (zoology)

    animal reproductive system: Annelids and mollusks: …anterior atoke and a posterior epitoke, in which gonads develop. When the moon is in a specific phase, the epitoke separates from the rest of the body and swims to the surface. The female epitoke apparently stimulates the male epitoke to release sperm, and sperm release, in turn, evokes expulsion…

  • epitoky (zoology)

    animal reproductive system: Annelids and mollusks: …anterior atoke and a posterior epitoke, in which gonads develop. When the moon is in a specific phase, the epitoke separates from the rest of the body and swims to the surface. The female epitoke apparently stimulates the male epitoke to release sperm, and sperm release, in turn, evokes expulsion…

  • Epitoma in Almagestum Ptolemaei (work by Regiomontanus)

    Nicolaus Copernicus: Early life and education: …a student of the heavens: Epitoma in Almagestum Ptolemaei (“Epitome of Ptolemy’s Almagest”) by Johann Müller (also known as Regiomontanus, 1436–76) and Disputationes adversus astrologianm divinatricenm (“Disputations against Divinatory Astrology”) by Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (1463–94). The first provided a summary of the foundations of Ptolemy’s astronomy, with

  • Epitoma rei militaris (work by Vegetius)

    Vegetius: …Rei militaris instituta, also called Epitoma rei militaris, written sometime between 384 and 389, advocated a revival of the old system but had almost no influence on the decaying military forces of the later Roman Empire. His rules on siege craft and on the need for discipline, however, were studied…

  • Epitoma vitae Roberti regis (work by Helgaud)

    Helgaud: …of Fleury-sur-Loire whose major work, Epitoma vitae Roberti regis, is an artless, historically unreliable biography of the French king Robert II the Pious.

  • Epitomae medicae libri septem (work by Paul of Aegina)

    Paul of Aegina: …known by its Latin title, Epitomae medicae libri septem (“Medical Compendium in Seven Books”), containing nearly everything known about the medical arts in the West in his time.

  • Epitome (work by Justin)

    Justin: …who was the author of Epitome, an abridgment of the Historiae Philippicae et totius mundi origines et terrae situs (Philippic Histories) by Pompeius Trogus, whose work is lost. Most of the abridgement is not so much a summary as passages quoted from Trogus, connected by colourless moralizing by Justin. Nothing…

  • Epitome arithmeticae practicae (work by Clavius)

    Li Zhizao: …Ricci translated his arithmetic primer Epitome arithmeticae practicae (1585; “Selected Arithmetic Methods”) as Tongwen suanzhi (1614). This book systematically introduced European-style mathematical notation, while Li included complementary elements from traditional Chinese mathematics. Li also wrote a short treatise on geometry dictated by Ricci. Together with the Portuguese Jesuit Francisco Furtado…

  • Epitome Astronomiae Copernicanae (work by Kepler)

    Johannes Kepler: Astronomical work: …astronomy, Epitome Astronomiae Copernicanae (1618–21; Epitome of Copernican Astronomy). The title mimicked Maestlin’s traditional-style textbook, but the content could not have been more different. The Epitome began with the elements of astronomy but then gathered together all the arguments for Copernicus’s theory and added to them Kepler’s harmonics and new…

  • épitome de l’antiquité des Gaules et de France (work by du Bellay)

    Guillaume du Bellay, seigneur de Langey: …of France were published as épitome de l’antiquité des Gaules et de France (1556; “Abridgment of the Early Times of Gaul and France”).

  • Epitome de T. Livio bellorum omnium annorum DCC (work by Florus)

    Publius Annius Florus: …work, called in some manuscripts Epitome de T. Livio bellorum omnium annorum DCC (“Abridgement from Livy of All the Wars over 1200 Years”), is a rhetorical panegyric of the greatness of Rome. Almost valueless historically, it was much used in the Middle Ages. In the manuscripts the writer is called…

  • Epitome of Copernican Astronomy (work by Kepler)

    Johannes Kepler: Astronomical work: …astronomy, Epitome Astronomiae Copernicanae (1618–21; Epitome of Copernican Astronomy). The title mimicked Maestlin’s traditional-style textbook, but the content could not have been more different. The Epitome began with the elements of astronomy but then gathered together all the arguments for Copernicus’s theory and added to them Kepler’s harmonics and new…

  • Epitome of the Almagest (work by Regiomontanus)

    Regiomontanus: …household and completed Peuerbach’s half-finished Epitome (c. 1462; first printed in 1496 as Epytoma…in Almagestum Ptolomei). His demonstration of an alternative to Ptolemy’s models for the orbits of Mercury and Venus with respect to the Sun gave Nicolaus Copernicus (1473–1543) the geometric key to reorient planetary motions around the Sun.…

  • Epitomes iatrikes biblio hepta (work by Paul of Aegina)

    Paul of Aegina: …known by its Latin title, Epitomae medicae libri septem (“Medical Compendium in Seven Books”), containing nearly everything known about the medical arts in the West in his time.

  • Epitoniidae (gastropod family)

    Wentletrap, any marine snail of the family Epitoniidae (subclass Prosobranchia of the class Gastropoda), in which the turreted shell—consisting of whorls that form a high, conical spiral—has deeply ribbed sculpturing. Most species are white, less than 5 cm (2 inches) long, and exude a pink or

  • epitope (biochemistry)

    Epitope, portion of a foreign protein, or antigen, that is capable of stimulating an immune response. An epitope is the part of the antigen that binds to a specific antigen receptor on the surface of a B cell. Binding between the receptor and epitope occurs only if their structures are

  • epitrachelion (religious vestment)

    stole: …the equivalent vestment is the epitrachelion worn by priests and the orarion worn by deacons.

  • épitres de l’amant vert (work by Lemaire de Belges)

    Jean Lemaire de Belges: His épitres de l’amant vert (1505; “Letters of a Green Lover”) contains two charming and witty letters in light verse describing the grief of Margaret of Austria’s parrot during her mistress’s absence. Lemaire traveled in Italy and was an admirer of Italian culture. His La Concorde…

  • Ep?tres, satires, chansons, épigrammes, et autres pièces de vers (poetry by Bibaud)

    Michel Bibaud: Bibaud’s poetry collection ép?tres, satires, chansons, épigrammes, et autres pièces de vers (1830) was the first in French Canadian literature; it includes four satires on ignorance, avarice, laziness, and envy.

  • Epitrix cucumeris (insect, Epitrix species)

    flea beetle: The cucumber beetle (Epitrix cucumeris) feeds on cucumbers and melon vines, E. hirtipennis attacks tobacco plants, and E. fuscula eats tomatoes and potatoes. The flea beetle Aphthona flava has been released in the United States and Canada as a biological control for the weed leafy spurge.

  • Epitrix fuscula (beetle)

    flea beetle: hirtipennis attacks tobacco plants, and E. fuscula eats tomatoes and potatoes. The flea beetle Aphthona flava has been released in the United States and Canada as a biological control for the weed leafy spurge.

  • Epitrix hirtipens (beetle)

    flea beetle: …on cucumbers and melon vines, E. hirtipennis attacks tobacco plants, and E. fuscula eats tomatoes and potatoes. The flea beetle Aphthona flava has been released in the United States and Canada as a biological control for the weed leafy spurge.

  • epitympanum (anatomy)

    human ear: Middle-ear cavity: …cavity) proper below and the epitympanum above. These chambers are also referred to as the atrium and the attic, respectively. The middle-ear space roughly resembles a rectangular room with four walls, a floor, and a ceiling. The outer (lateral) wall of the middle-ear space is formed by the tympanic membrane.…

  • Epixerus (rodent)

    squirrel: Natural history: The African palm squirrels (genus Epixerus) are long-legged runners that forage only on the ground. Certain species, such as the red-tailed squirrel (S. granatensis) of the American tropics and the African pygmy squirrel, are active from ground to canopy. In the United States, the Eastern fox…

  • epizeuxis (literature)

    Epizeuxis, in literature, a form of repetition in which a word is repeated immediately for emphasis, as in the first and last lines of “Hark, Hark! the Lark,” a song in William Shakespeare’s

  • Epizoanthus americanus (invertebrate)

    zoanthid: Epizoanthus americanus, occurring in Atlantic coastal temperate waters off North America, attaches to the seashell inhabited by a hermit crab, dissolves the shell, and eventually encloses the crab.

  • epizoochory (biology)

    seed: Dispersal by animals: …agents most frequently involved in epizoochory, the inadvertent carrying by animals of dispersal units. Burrlike seeds and fruits, or those diaspores provided with spines, hooks, claws, bristles, barbs, grapples, and prickles, are genuine hitchhikers, clinging tenaciously to their carriers. Their functional shape is achieved in various ways—in cleavers, or bedstraw…

  • epizootic disease (pathology)

    animal disease: Role of ecology: …referred to as epidemic, or epizootic, diseases, and they generally represent an unstable relationship between the causative agent and affected animals.

  • Eplattenier, Charles L’ (artist)

    Le Corbusier: Education and early years: There, Charles L’Eplattenier, whom Le Corbusier later called his only teacher, taught him art history, drawing, and the naturalist aesthetics of Art Nouveau.

  • EPLF (political organization, Eritrea)

    Eritrean People’s Liberation Front (EPLF), secessionist movement that successfully fought for the creation of an independent Eritrean nation out of the northernmost province of Ethiopia in 1993. The historical region of Eritrea had joined Ethiopia as an autonomous unit in 1952. The Eritrean

  • EPM (rubber)

    major industrial polymers: Ethylene-propylene copolymers: …are known as EPM (ethylene-propylene monomer) and the latter as EPDM (ethylene-propylene-diene monomer). The copolymers contain approximately 60 percent by weight ethylene. A pronounced advantage of EPDM is that the residual carbon-carbon double bond (i.e., the double bond that remains after polymerization) is attached to the polymer chain rather…

  • EPO (hormone)

    Erythropoietin, hormone produced largely in the kidneys that influences the rate of production of red blood cells (erythrocytes). When the number of circulating red cells decreases or when the oxygen transported by the blood diminishes, an unidentified sensor detects the change, and the production

  • EPO

    European Patent Office (EPO), executive branch of the European Patent Organisation, the international organization that issues European patents. The European Patent Organisation was created by the European Patent Convention, which was signed by 16 European countries in Munich on Oct. 5, 1973, and

  • EPOCh (United States space mission)

    Deep Impact: …EPOXI, consisting of two projects: Extrasolar Planet Observation and Characterization (EPOCh) and Deep Impact Extended Investigation (DIXI).

  • epoch (time measurement)

    time: Time measurement: general concepts: …unique number to either an epoch, which specifies the moment when an instantaneous event occurs, in the sense of time of day, or a time interval, which is the duration of a continued event. The progress of any phenomenon that undergoes regular changes may be used to measure time. Such…

  • epoch (geologic time)

    Epoch, unit of geological time during which a rock series is deposited. It is a subdivision of a geological period, and the word is capitalized when employed in a formal sense (e.g., Pleistocene Epoch). Additional distinctions can be made by appending relative time terms, such as early, middle, and

  • epochē (philosophy)

    Epochē, in Greek philosophy, “suspension of judgment,” a principle originally espoused by nondogmatic philosophical Skeptics of the ancient Greek Academy who, viewing the problem of knowledge as insoluble, proposed that, when controversy arises, an attitude of noninvolvement should be adopted in

  • Epochs of Chinese and Japanese Art (work by Fenollosa)

    Ernest F. Fenollosa: …draft of his two-volume masterpiece Epochs of Chinese and Japanese Art but left many names of painters and temples incomplete. His second wife saw to the correction of most of the omissions and errors, and the work was published in 1912. His widow also turned over to Ezra Pound a…

  • epode (literature)

    Epode, a verse form composed of two lines differing in construction and often in metre, the second shorter than the first. In Greek lyric odes, an epode is the third part of the three-part structure of the poem, following the strophe and the antistrophe. The word is from the Greek epōidós, “sung”

  • Epodes (work by Horace)

    Horace: Life: …the 30s bc his 17 Epodes were also under way. Mockery here is almost fierce, the metre being that traditionally used for personal attacks and ridicule, though Horace attacks social abuses, not individuals. The tone reflects his anxious mood after Philippi. Horace used his commitment to the ideals of Alexandrian…

  • Epomophorus wahlbergi (bat species)

    Old World fruit bat: …of the family are the epauletted fruit bats (Epomophorus), in which the male has tufts of pale hair on the shoulders, and the hammer-headed fruit bat (Hypsignathus monstrosus), which has a large, blunt muzzle and pendulous lips.

  • Epona (Celtic and Roman goddess)

    Epona, goddess who was patron of horses and also of asses and mules (epo- is the Gaulish equivalent of the Latin equo-; “horse”). The majority of inscriptions and images bearing her name have been found in Gaul, Germany, and the Danube countries; of the few that occur in Rome most have been found

  • eponym

    Eponym, one for whom or which something is or is believed to be named. The word can refer, for example, to the usually mythical ancestor or totem animal or object that a social group (such as a tribe) holds to be the origin of its name. In its most familiar use, eponym denotes a person for whom a

  • eponym list

    chronology: Mesopotamian chronology, 747 to 539 bc: …at the same time as eponym lists, and a number of these annals, or the campaigns mentioned in them, were dated by eponyms who figured in the eponym lists. Moreover, some of the Assyrian kings in the annals were also kings of Babylonia and as such were included in Ptolemy’s…

  • époques de la nature (work by Buffon)

    Georges-Louis Leclerc, count de Buffon: …1774–89, the most famous section, époques de la nature (1778), being contained in the fifth of them. They were succeeded by nine volumes on birds (1770–83), and these again by five volumes on minerals (1783–88). The remaining eight volumes, which complete the first edition, were done by the count de…

  • Eporedia (Italy)

    Ivrea, town and episcopal see, Piemonte (Piedmont) region, northwestern Italy, on the Dora Baltea River, north of Turin. The importance of its gold mines led the Romans to seize the district from the Salassi in 143 bc. Ivrea was a Lombard duchy and, from the 9th century, a marquessate, and two of

  • EPOXI (United States space mission)

    comet: Spacecraft exploration of comets: Deep Impact, in its postimpact EPOXI mission, flew past Comet Hartley 2 on November 4, 2010. It imaged a small nucleus about 2.3 km (1.4 miles) in length and 0.9 km (0.6 mile) wide. As with Halley and Borrelly, the nucleus appeared to be two bodies stuck together, each having…

  • epoxide (chemical compound)

    Epoxide, cyclic ether with a three-membered ring. The basic structure of an epoxide contains an oxygen atom attached to two adjacent carbon atoms of a hydrocarbon. The strain of the three-membered ring makes an epoxide much more reactive than a typical acyclic ether. Ethylene oxide is economically

  • epoxy (thermosetting polymer)

    Epoxy, Any of a class of thermosetting polymers, polyethers built up from monomers with an ether group that takes the form of a three-membered epoxide ring. The familiar two-part epoxy adhesives consist of a resin with epoxide rings at the ends of its molecules and a curing agent containing amines

  • epoxy resin (chemical compound)

    major industrial polymers: Epoxies (epoxy resins): Epoxies are polyethers built up from monomers in which the ether group takes the form of a three-membered ring known as the epoxide ring:

  • EPP (guerrilla group, Paraguay)

    Paraguay: Paraguay in the 21st century: …been carried out by the Paraguayan People’s Army (EPP), which was formally organized in 2008 but had been active for some two decades. The tiny Marxist group (thought to comprise only several dozen members) may have killed as many as 60 people since beginning its rebellion, which was carried out…

  • EPP (political party, Europe)

    European People’s Party (EPP), transnational political group representing the interests of allied conservative parties in Europe, particularly in the European Union (EU). The EPP was formed in 1953 as the Christian Democrat Group, which acted as a transnational political party in the Common

  • EPP (physiology)

    End-plate potential (EPP), chemically induced change in electric potential of the motor end plate, the portion of the muscle-cell membrane that lies opposite the terminal of a nerve fibre at the neuromuscular junction. The end-plate membrane is electrically polarized, the inside being negative with

  • EPP (surgery)

    mesothelioma: Survival prediction and treatment: A more aggressive operation, extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP), may be required in more-advanced cases. EPP involves the removal of tumour, pleura, diaphragm, and pericardium, with reconstruction of the latter two structures. The tumour grows over a very large surface area, and for that reason the risk of local recurrence following…

  • Eppens, Francisco (Mexican artist)

    mosaic: Renaissance to modern mosaics: Francisco Eppens also used historical themes in his mosaic decorations of the schools of medicine and dentistry at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (1957), as did Xavier Guerro in the Cine Ermita in Mexico City. Carlos Mérida, however, created abstract mosaic designs in the…

  • Epperson v. State of Arkansas (law case)

    Epperson v. State of Arkansas, case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on November 12, 1968, ruled (9–0) that an Arkansas law barring the teaching of evolution in public schools violated the First Amendment’s establishment clause, which generally prohibits the government from establishing, advancing,

  • EPPIC (Australian mental health organization)

    Patrick McGorry: …appointed director of the university’s Early Psychosis Prevention and Intervention Centre (EPPIC), which offers services intended to diagnose and treat the early symptoms of psychosis. Also in 1992 he became an associate professor of psychiatry, and in 1996 he became director of the university’s Centre for Young People’s Mental Health…

  • Epping Forest (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Epping Forest, district, administrative and historic county of Essex, England. It occupies the southwestern part of the county at the northeastern edge of Greater London. The name also refers to an ancient tract of woodland that crosses the district. The original forest was a royal hunting ground

  • Eppley Airfield (airport, Omaha, Nebraska, United States)

    Nebraska: Transportation: Eppley Airfield in Omaha is one of the country’s largest airports and the largest in Nebraska. It offers nonstop flights to many domestic cities.

  • Eppley pyrheliometer (instrument)

    sunlight: The Eppley pyrheliometer measures the length of time that the surface receives sunlight and the sunshine’s intensity as well. It consists of two concentric silver rings of equal area, one blackened and the other whitened, connected to a thermopile. The sun’s rays warm the blackened ring…

  • Eppridge, Bill (American photographer)

    Bill Eppridge, (Guillermo Alfredo Eduardo Eppridge), American photographer (born March 20, 1938, Buenos Aires, Arg.—died Oct. 3, 2013, Danbury, Conn.), was a visual historian who captured images of politicians, performers, sports figures, and activists that became iconic relics of some of the most

  • Eppridge, Guillermo Alfredo Eduardo (American photographer)

    Bill Eppridge, (Guillermo Alfredo Eduardo Eppridge), American photographer (born March 20, 1938, Buenos Aires, Arg.—died Oct. 3, 2013, Danbury, Conn.), was a visual historian who captured images of politicians, performers, sports figures, and activists that became iconic relics of some of the most

  • Epps, Edwin (American slaveowner)

    Solomon Northup: …by Ford and Tibaut to Edwin Epps, under whose ownership he remained for the next decade. Epps used Northup both as an artisan slave and as a field hand, occasionally leasing him out to sugar planters and processors. Throughout this time, Northup was often a “driver” in charge of other…

  • Epps, Meave (British paleoanthropologist)

    Meave G. Leakey, British paleoanthropologist who was part of a family that gained renown for decades of pioneering hominin research in eastern Africa. As a college student, Epps planned to be a marine zoologist, and she earned a B.S. in zoology and marine zoology from the University of North Wales,

  • EPR (environmental practice and policy)

    Extended producer responsibility, a practice and a policy approach in which producers take responsibility for management of the disposal of products they produce once those products are designated as no longer useful by consumers. Responsibility for disposal may be fiscal, physical, or a

  • EPR (physics)

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), selective absorption of weak radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation (in the microwave region) by unpaired electrons in the atomic structure of certain materials that simultaneously are subjected to a constant, strong magnetic field. The unpaired electrons,

  • EPR spectroscopy (physics)

    chemical analysis: Microwave absorptiometry: …for nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, electron spin resonance spectrometry is used to study spinning electrons. The absorbed radiation falls in the microwave spectral region and induces transitions in the spin states of the electrons. An externally applied magnetic field is required. The technique is effective for studying structures and reactions…

  • EPR state (physics)

    carbene: Electronic configuration and molecular structure.: …and are referred to as singlet states. In principle, carbenes can exist in either the singlet or triplet state (depending upon whether the electrons are in the same or different orbitals, respectively).

Your preference has been recorded
Get a Premium membership for 30% off!
Save 30% with our Memorial Day Sale!
港台一级毛片免费观看