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  • enumerative bibliography

    bibliography: Descriptive bibliography: The primary purpose of descriptive bibliography is to organize detailed information culled from a mass of materials in a systematic way so that others can have access to useful information. In the earliest bibliographies, the organizing principle was simply that of compiling all…

  • enuresis (pathology)

    Enuresis, elimination disorder characterized by four factors: the repeated voluntary or involuntary voiding of urine during the day or night into bedding or clothing; two or more occurrences per month for a child between the ages of five and six (one or more for older children); chronological age

  • envelope (wave)

    Huygens' principle: …front and is called the envelope of the wavelets. If a medium is homogeneous and has the same properties throughout (i.e., is isotropic), permitting light to travel with the same speed regardless of its direction of propagation, the three-dimensional envelope of a point source will be spherical; otherwise, as is…

  • envelope (cytology)

    virus: Size and shape: …a lipoprotein membrane (called an envelope), derived from the membrane of the host cell, that surrounds the nucleocapsid core. Penetrating the membrane are additional proteins that determine the specificity of the virus to host cells. The protein and nucleic acid constituents have properties unique for each class of virus; when…

  • envelope (sound)

    Envelope, in musical sound, the attack, sustain, and decay of a sound. Attack transients consist of changes occurring before the sound reaches its steady-state intensity. Sustain refers to the steady state of a sound at its maximum intensity, and decay is the rate at which it fades to silence. In

  • envelope (electronics)

    motion-picture technology: Light sources: tungsten-halogen lamps with quartz envelopes came into wide use. The halogen compound is included inside the envelope, and its purpose is to combine with the tungsten evaporated from the hot filament. This forms a compound that is electrically attracted back to the tungsten filament. It thus prevents the evaporated…

  • envelope (mathematics)

    Envelope, in mathematics, a curve that is tangential to each one of a family of curves in a plane or, in three dimensions, a surface that is tangent to each one of a family of surfaces. For example, two parallel lines are the envelope of the family of circles of the same radius having centres on a

  • envelope (poetry)

    Envelope, in poetry, a device in which a line or a stanza is repeated so as to enclose a section of verse, as in Sir Thomas Wyatt’s “Is it

  • envelope (balloon component)

    balloon flight: Elements of balloon flight: …for the actual balloon, or envelope. Cotton, nylon, and polyester are common for the envelopes of hot-air balloons. Cotton, having a poor weight-to-strength ratio, is only favoured for carnival “smoke” balloons. Although gas balloons have sometimes used rubberized cotton, modern sport gas balloons use urethane-coated nylon. Balloons for high-altitude research…

  • Enver Hoxha University (university, Tiran?, Albania)

    Albania: Education: The University of Tirana (1957) is the country’s major institution of higher education. Tirana also has an agricultural and polytechnic university, along with an impressive network of professional and vocational schools. More than nine-tenths of the population age 15 and older is literate.

  • Enver Pa?a (Ottoman general)

    Enver Pa?a, Ottoman general and commander in chief, a hero of the Young Turk Revolution of 1908, and a leading member of the Ottoman government from 1913 to 1918. He played a key role in the Ottoman entry into World War I on the side of Germany, and, after the Ottoman defeat in 1918, he attempted

  • Envers et l’endroit, L’? (work by Camus)

    Albert Camus: Early years: …first published collection of essays, L’Envers et l’endroit (1937; “The Wrong Side and the Right Side”), describes the physical setting of these early years and includes portraits of his mother, grandmother, and uncle. A second collection of essays, Noces (1938; “Nuptials”), contains intensely lyrical meditations on the Algerian countryside and…

  • Envigado (Colombia)

    Envigado, city, Antioquia departamento, northwestern Colombia. It is situated near the Porce River, between the Occidental and Central ranges of the Andes Mountains, at an elevation of 5,085 feet (1,550 m) above sea level. Formerly a commercial and manufacturing centre for a fertile agricultural

  • environment (biology)

    Environment, the complex of physical, chemical, and biotic factors that act upon an organism or an ecological community and ultimately determine its form and survival. The Earth’s environment is treated in a number of articles. The major components of the physical environment are discussed in the

  • Environment and Development, Declaration on (international agreement)

    common but differentiated responsibilities: …international legal texts include the Rio Declaration, where it is enunciated as “Principle 7,” and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, together with its 1997 Kyoto Protocol. It was retroactively incorporated into the Vienna Convention and Montreal Protocol on substances that destroy the ozone layer. Practically, it entails…

  • environment-heredity controversy (psychology)

    heredity: Heredity and environment: A notion that was widespread among pioneer biologists in the 18th century was that the fetus, and hence the adult organism that develops from it, is preformed in the sex cells. Some early microscopists even imagined that they saw…

  • environmental biology

    Ecology, study of the relationships between organisms and their environment. Some of the most pressing problems in human affairs—expanding populations, food scarcities, environmental pollution including global warming, extinctions of plant and animal species, and all the attendant sociological and

  • environmental change (ecology)

    sex: Sexual and nonsexual reproduction: If some adverse environmental change should occur, all would be equally affected and none might survive. At the best, therefore, nonsexual reproduction can be a valuable and perhaps an essential means of propagation, but it does not exclude the need for sexual reproduction.

  • Environmental Cooperation, Commission for (international commission)

    North American Free Trade Agreement: Provisions: …Cooperation (NAAEC), which created the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) in 1994.

  • Environmental Defense Fund (American organization)

    Environmental Defense Fund, American environmental organization working on such issues as climate change, pollution, and endangered wildlife. It was founded in 1967 and successfully fought in the courts for a U.S. ban on the synthetic insecticide DDT. With a staff that includes scientists,

  • environmental determinism (social science)

    anthropology: Environmental and ecological studies in anthropology: A view known as environmental determinism, which holds that environmental features directly determine aspects of human behaviour and society, was propounded by many Enlightenment philosophers, who argued that differences among peoples were not innate but were due to climate, landscape, and other environmental factors. By the early 20th century,…

  • environmental economics

    Environmental economics, subdiscipline of economics that applies the values and tools of mainstream macroeconomics and microeconomics to allocate environmental resources more efficiently. On the political stage, environmental issues are usually placed at odds with economic issues; environmental

  • environmental engineering

    Environmental engineering, the development of processes and infrastructure for the supply of water, the disposal of waste, and the control of pollution of all kinds. These endeavours protect public health by preventing disease transmission, and they preserve the quality of the environment by

  • environmental ethics (philosophy)

    anthropocentrism: Prior to the emergence of environmental ethics as an academic field, conservationists such as John Muir and Aldo Leopold argued that the natural world has an intrinsic value, an approach informed by aesthetic appreciation of nature’s beauty, as well as an ethical rejection of a purely exploitative valuation of the…

  • environmental geology

    Environmental geology, field concerned with applying the findings of geologic research to the problems of land use and civil engineering. It is closely allied with urban geology and deals with the impact of human activities on the physical environment (e.g., contamination of water resources by

  • environmental health

    Environmental health, area of study in the field of public health that is concerned with assessing and controlling the impacts of humans on their environment and the impacts of the environment on humans. The environment, including its vegetation, other animals, and natural and historic landmarks,

  • environmental health engineering

    Environmental engineering, the development of processes and infrastructure for the supply of water, the disposal of waste, and the control of pollution of all kinds. These endeavours protect public health by preventing disease transmission, and they preserve the quality of the environment by

  • environmental impact statement (law)

    National Environmental Policy Act: Called an environmental impact statement (EIS), it describes the expected environmental effects of the action—including adverse impacts, reasonable alternatives, and any irreversible changes—and assesses both short- and long-term gains.. The EIS is reviewed by the Office of Federal Activities within the Environmental Protection Agency. Notices of EAs…

  • environmental infrastructure

    Environmental infrastructure, infrastructure that provides cities and towns with water supply, waste disposal, and pollution control services. They include extensive networks of aqueducts, reservoirs, water distribution pipes, sewer pipes, and pumping stations; treatment systems such as

  • environmental justice (social movement)

    Environmental justice, social movement seeking to address the inequitable distribution of environmental hazards among the poor and minorities. Advocates for environmental justice hold that all people deserve to live in a clean and safe environment free from industrial waste and pollution that can

  • environmental lapse rate (meteorology)

    atmosphere: Convection: …free convection, occurs when the environmental lapse rate (the rate of change of an atmospheric variable, such as temperature or density, with increasing altitude) of temperature decreases at a rate greater than 1 °C per 100 metres (approximately 1 °F per 150 feet). This rate is called the adiabatic lapse…

  • environmental law

    Environmental law, principles, policies, directives, and regulations enacted and enforced by local, national, or international entities to regulate human treatment of the nonhuman world. The vast field covers a broad range of topics in diverse legal settings, such as state bottle-return laws in the

  • environmental literacy (linguistics)

    writing: Literacy and schooling: Environmental literacy or lay literacy is the term used to designate that form of unspecialized competence involved in generally dealing with a literate environment. Such literacy need never be taught. It is a type of literacy that is acquired through participating in a literate environment in which written…

  • environmental medicine

    Environmental medicine, medical science involving the study of the relationship between human health and biological, chemical, and physical factors in the environment. The modern field of environmental medicine originated sometime around the mid-20th century, when possible links between

  • environmental noise (acoustics)

    noise pollution: Dealing with the effects of noise: Environmental and industrial noise is regulated in the United States under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the Noise Control Act of 1972. Under these acts, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration set up industrial noise criteria in order to provide limits…

  • Environmental Overkill (work by Ray)

    Dixy Lee Ray: …movement—Trashing the Planet (1990) and Environmental Overkill (1993). While conservative commentators took the message of those volumes as a rallying cry against what they perceived as alarmist attitudes toward environmental problems such as global warming, critics in the scientific community excoriated Ray for misrepresenting scientific studies to suit her arguments.

  • environmental policy

    Environmental policy, any measure by a government or corporation or other public or private organization regarding the effects of human activities on the environment, particularly those measures that are designed to prevent or reduce harmful effects of human activities on ecosystems. Environmental

  • environmental pollution (environment)

    Pollution, the addition of any substance (solid, liquid, or gas) or any form of energy (such as heat, sound, or radioactivity) to the environment at a rate faster than it can be dispersed, diluted, decomposed, recycled, or stored in some harmless form. The major kinds of pollution, usually

  • environmental portraiture (photography)

    Arnold Newman: This approach, known as “environmental portraiture,” greatly influenced portrait photography in the 20th century.

  • Environmental Protection Agency (United States government agency)

    Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), agency of the U.S. government that sets and enforces national pollution-control standards. In 1970, in response to the welter of confusing, often ineffective environmental protection laws enacted by states and communities, President Richard Nixon created the

  • Environmental Quality, Council on (United States government agency)

    National Environmental Policy Act: …of NEPA rests with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), which was created by the U.S. Congress as part of NEPA. The scope of NEPA is limited to agencies of the federal government. Some states have enacted similar regulations, mandating that their agencies consider environmental impact as one fact when…

  • environmental resistance (biology)

    biotic potential: …an organism is restricted by environmental resistance, any factor that inhibits the increase in number of the population. These factors include unfavourable climatic conditions; lack of space, light, or a suitable substrate; deficiencies of necessary chemical compounds or minerals; and the inhibiting effects of predators, parasites, disease organisms, or unfavourable…

  • environmental scanning electron microscope (instrument)

    Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), type of electron microscope. Unlike the conventional scanning electron microscope, the ESEM obviates the need for special specimen preparation (for example, covering the specimen with gold to render it electrically conducting is unnecessary) and

  • environmental science

    Environmental science, interdisciplinary academic field that draws on ecology, geology, meteorology, biology, chemistry, engineering, and physics to study environmental problems and human impacts on the environment. Environmental science is a quantitative discipline with both applied and

  • environmental sculpture (art)

    Environmental sculpture, 20th-century art form intended to involve or encompass the spectators rather than merely to face them; the form developed as part of a larger artistic current that sought to break down the historical dichotomy between life and art. The environmental sculptor can utilize

  • environmental sustainability

    sustainability: Forms of sustainability: …environmental performance, and the expression environmental sustainability is used to emphasize that point. Parallel references can be found to the terms social sustainability, economic sustainability, and cultural sustainability, which allude to threats to long-term well-being in each of those domains. Local sustainability emphasizes the importance of place. Corporate sustainability is…

  • environmental terrorism

    Ecoterrorism, destruction, or the threat of destruction, of the environment by states, groups, or individuals in order to intimidate or to coerce governments or civilians. The term also has been applied to a variety of crimes committed against companies or government agencies and intended to

  • environmental theatre (theatrical movement)

    Environmental theatre, a branch of the New Theatre movement of the 1960s that aimed to heighten audience awareness of theatre by eliminating the distinction between the audience’s and the actors’ space. Richard Schechner’s environmental productions Dionysus in 69, Makbeth, and Commune were

  • environmental tobacco smoke (tobacco)

    class action: …effects of passive smoking (inhaling secondhand smoke) brought against tobacco firms (settled in 1997), and a suit brought by some 1.5 million female employees of Wal-Mart alleging sex discrimination by the discount department store chain (dismissed in 2011).

  • environmental tourism

    environmental law: Sustainable development: …law of sustainable development is ecotourism. Although tourism poses the threat of environmental harm from pollution and the overuse of natural resources, it also can create economic incentives for the preservation of the environment in developing countries and increase awareness of unique and fragile ecosystems throughout the world. In 1995…

  • environmental toxicology

    Environmental toxicology, field of study in the environmental sciences that is concerned with the assessment of toxic substances in the environment. Although it is based on toxicology, environmental toxicology draws heavily on principles and techniques from other fields, including biochemistry,

  • environmental warfare

    ecoterrorism: …of ecoterrorism, often described as environmental warfare, consists of the deliberate and illegal destruction, exploitation, or modification of the environment as a strategy of war or in times of armed conflict (including civil conflict within states). Modification of the environment that occurs during armed conflict and is likely to have…

  • environmental works

    Environmental infrastructure, infrastructure that provides cities and towns with water supply, waste disposal, and pollution control services. They include extensive networks of aqueducts, reservoirs, water distribution pipes, sewer pipes, and pumping stations; treatment systems such as

  • environmental-assessment mandate (law)

    environmental law: Environmental assessment mandates: Environmental assessment mandates are another significant form of environmental law. Such mandates generally perform three functions: (1) identification of a level or threshold of potential environmental impact at which a contemplated action is significant enough to require the preparation of an assessment,…

  • environmental-impact assessment (law)

    environmental law: Environmental assessment mandates: Environmental assessment mandates are another significant form of environmental law. Such mandates generally perform three functions: (1) identification of a level or threshold of potential environmental impact at which a contemplated action is significant enough to require the preparation of an assessment,…

  • environmentalism (social science)

    Environmentalism, political and ethical movement that seeks to improve and protect the quality of the natural environment through changes to environmentally harmful human activities; through the adoption of forms of political, economic, and social organization that are thought to be necessary for,

  • environmentalism (ecology)

    Conservation, study of the loss of Earth’s biological diversity and the ways this loss can be prevented. Biological diversity, or biodiversity, is the variety of life either in a particular place or on the entire planet Earth, including its ecosystems, species, populations, and genes. Conservation

  • Environmentally Responsible Economies, Coalition for (American nonprofit organization)

    Coalition for Environmentally Responsible Economies (CERES), U.S. nonprofit organization founded in 1989 to advocate for ethical and environmentally sustainable business practices. CERES was founded with the belief that businesses should take a proactive stance on environmental issues, because

  • envoi (poetry)

    ballade: …dedicatory stanza is called the prince (because that is usually its first word), or the envoi. The chant royal is similar to the ballade but has five main stanzas.

  • envoi (literature)

    Envoi, the usually explanatory or commendatory concluding remarks to a poem, essay, or book. The term is specifically used to mean a short, fixed final stanza of a poem (such as a ballade) pointing the moral and usually addressing the person to whom the poem is written. Although they are most often

  • envoy (diplomat)

    diplomacy: Nature and purpose: …negotiation, primarily conducted by accredited envoys (a term derived from the French envoyé, meaning “one who is sent”) and other political leaders. Unlike foreign policy, which generally is enunciated publicly, most diplomacy is conducted in confidence, though both the fact that it is in progress and its results are almost…

  • envoy extraordinary (diplomat)

    diplomacy: The spread of the Italian diplomatic system: …when the title of “envoy extraordinary” gained currency, originally for special ceremonial missions.

  • Envoys of Agamemnon, The (work by Ingres)

    J.-A.-D. Ingres: Early life and works: Ingres’s prizewinning painting, The Envoys of Agamemnon, demonstrates his mastery of the standard academic pictorial vocabulary of the day, as well as his attraction to certain stylistic archaisms then coming into fashion.

  • Envy (work by Olesha)

    Yury Karlovich Olesha: …published in book form 1928; Envy), the central theme of which is the fate of the intelligentsia in Russia’s postrevolutionary society. Olesha’s obvious enthusiasm for the new state of affairs did not hinder him from seeing and conveying to the reader the dramatic clash between the rational industrial state and…

  • Envy and Gratitude (work by Klein)

    Melanie Klein: …of papers and a book, Envy and Gratitude (1957). Her final work, published posthumously in 1961, Narrative of a Child Analysis, was based on detailed notes taken during 1941.

  • Enwezor, Okwuchukwu Emmanuel (Nigerian-born art curator)

    Okwui Enwezor, Nigerian-born poet, art critic, art historian, and curator who helped bring global attention to African art. Enwezor was raised in Enugu in eastern Nigeria. In the early 1980s he relocated to the United States to attend Jersey City State College (now New Jersey City University),

  • Enwezor, Okwui (Nigerian-born art curator)

    Okwui Enwezor, Nigerian-born poet, art critic, art historian, and curator who helped bring global attention to African art. Enwezor was raised in Enugu in eastern Nigeria. In the early 1980s he relocated to the United States to attend Jersey City State College (now New Jersey City University),

  • Enwonwu, Benedict Chuka (Nigerian artist)

    Benedict Chuka Enwonwu, Nigerian artist (born July 14, 1921, Onitsha, Nigeria—died Feb. 5, 1994, Lagos, Nigeria), gained international recognition in the 1950s and ’60s for figurative sculptures and paintings in which he combined classical Western training with traditional African elements. E

  • Enx?fre Caldera (caldera, Portugal)

    Graciosa Island: …metres) at the summit of Enx?fre Caldera, a volcanic crater. Dense vegetation is supported by the volcanic soils, and wine grapes, fruit, cereals, and cattle are raised. They are marketed through the principal settlements, Santa Cruz (north) and Praia. Discovered in 1451, the island may have been named Graciosa because…

  • Enya (Irish singer)

    Ireland: Music and dance: …the ethereal-voiced New Age singer Enya (Eithne Ní Bhraonáin) gained a huge international following beginning in the late 1980s. Opera is less popular in Ireland, although singers such as Bernadette Greevy and Suzanne Murphy have gained widespread recognition. Among the artists who came to the forefront in the 21st century…

  • Enya (people)

    Congo River: Life of the river peoples: The Enya (Wagenia) of Boyoma Falls and the Manyanga living downstream from Malebo Pool attach fish traps to stakes or to dams built in the rapids themselves. Fishing of a very different nature, notably by poison, is conducted in the marshy areas, where the population is…

  • Enyalius (Greek mythology)

    Ares: …were two lesser war deities: Enyalius, who is virtually identical with Ares himself, and Enyo, a female counterpart.

  • Enyo (Greek mythology)

    Ares: …identical with Ares himself, and Enyo, a female counterpart.

  • Enyong (people)

    Ibibio: …major divisions: Efik, Northern (Enyong), Southern (Eket), Delta (Andoni-Ibeno), Western (Anang), and Eastern (the Ibibio proper).

  • Enzeli (Iran)

    Bandar-e Anzalī, principal port and resort, northern Iran, on the Caspian Sea, connected with Māzandarān, Azerbaijan, and Tehrān by road. The population includes Russians, Armenians, Caucasians, and Turkmens. Founded in the early 19th century, the town lies on both sides of the entrance to Mordāb

  • Enzi, Michael Bradley (United States senator)

    Mike Enzi, American politician who was elected as a Republican to the U.S. Senate in 1996 and began representing Wyoming the following year. Enzi grew up in Thermopolis, Wyoming. An avid outdoor enthusiast, he attained Eagle Scout rank in the Boy Scouts. In 1966 he earned a bachelor’s degree in

  • Enzi, Mike (United States senator)

    Mike Enzi, American politician who was elected as a Republican to the U.S. Senate in 1996 and began representing Wyoming the following year. Enzi grew up in Thermopolis, Wyoming. An avid outdoor enthusiast, he attained Eagle Scout rank in the Boy Scouts. In 1966 he earned a bachelor’s degree in

  • Enzinas, Francisco de (Spanish scholar)

    Francisco de Enzinas, Spanish scholar and humanist, one of the most important figures of the abortive Spanish Reformation. While studying at Wittenberg University, Enzinas became a friend and protégé of the Lutheran reformer Philipp Melanchthon. Enzinas’ Spanish translation of the New Testament,

  • Enzio (king of Sardinia)

    Frederick II: Struggle with the papacy: …marriage of Frederick’s natural son Enzio with the Sardinian princess Adelasia and the designation of Enzio as king of Sardinia, in which the papacy claimed suzerainty, led to the final break with the pope. Gregory IX deeply distrusted Frederick both in religious and political matters: Frederick was supposed to have…

  • Enzo (king of Sardinia)

    Frederick II: Struggle with the papacy: …marriage of Frederick’s natural son Enzio with the Sardinian princess Adelasia and the designation of Enzio as king of Sardinia, in which the papacy claimed suzerainty, led to the final break with the pope. Gregory IX deeply distrusted Frederick both in religious and political matters: Frederick was supposed to have…

  • enzootic disease (medicine)

    animal disease: Role of ecology: …referred to as endemic, or enzootic, diseases, and they usually reflect a relatively stable relationship between the causative agent and the animals affected by it. Diseases that occasionally occur at higher than normal rates in animal populations are referred to as epidemic, or epizootic, diseases, and they generally represent an…

  • enzymatic browning (chemistry)

    food additive: Antioxidants: …oxidation reactions, collectively known as enzymatic browning, is a dark pigment called melanin. Antioxidants that inhibit enzyme-catalyzed oxidation include agents that bind free oxygen (i.e., reducing agents), such as ascorbic acid (vitamin C), and agents that inactivate the enzymes, such as citric acid and sulfites.

  • enzyme (biochemistry)

    Enzyme, a substance that acts as a catalyst in living organisms, regulating the rate at which chemical reactions proceed without itself being altered in the process. A brief treatment of enzymes follows. For full treatment, see protein: Enzymes. The biological processes that occur within all living

  • enzyme analysis (diagnostics)

    Enzyme analysis, in blood serum, measurement of the activity of specific enzymes in a sample of blood serum, usually for the purpose of identifying a disease. The enzymes normally are concentrated in cells and tissues where they perform their catalytic function; in disease, however, certain

  • enzyme inhibition (enzymatic reactions)

    Inhibition, in enzymology, a phenomenon in which a compound, called an inhibitor, in most cases similar in structure to the substance (substrate) upon which an enzyme acts to form a product, interacts with the enzyme so that the resulting complex either cannot undergo the usual reaction or cannot

  • enzyme inhibitor (biochemistry)

    biochemistry: Applied biochemistry: …have been designed specifically as enzyme inhibitors to interfere with the metabolism of a host or invasive agent. Biochemical advances in the knowledge of the action of natural hormones and antibiotics promise to aid further in the development of specific pharmaceuticals.

  • enzyme replacement therapy (medicine)

    Gaucher disease: …disease may be treated by enzyme replacement therapy in which injections of imiglucerase, a synthetic analog of glucocerebrosidase that is made using recombinant DNA technology, are administered on a weekly or biweekly basis. Enzyme replacement therapy is generally ineffective in treating type 2 and type 3 Gaucher disease, because the…

  • enzyme-catalyzed oxidation (chemistry)

    food additive: Antioxidants: …of the hydrocarbon chain) and enzyme-catalyzed oxidation.

  • enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (medicine)

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), biochemical procedure in which a signal produced by an enzymatic reaction is used to detect and quantify the amount of a specific substance in a solution. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) typically are used to detect antigens, though they can

  • Eoanthropus dawsoni (anthropological hoax)

    Piltdown man, (Eoanthropus dawsoni), proposed species of extinct hominin (member of the human lineage) whose fossil remains, discovered in England in 1910–12, were later proved to be fraudulent. Piltdown man, whose fossils were sufficiently convincing to generate a scholarly controversy lasting

  • Eocambrian Period (geochronology)

    Lipalian interval: …the latest Precambrian (sometimes termed Eocambrian) to the earliest Cambrian.

  • Eocambrian System (geochronology)

    Lipalian interval: …the latest Precambrian (sometimes termed Eocambrian) to the earliest Cambrian.

  • Eocelia (brachiopod genus)

    evolution: Gradual and punctuational evolution: …fossil brachiopods of the genus Eocelia. Results of the analysis of an abundant sample of fossils in Wales from near the beginning of the Devonian Period is shown in the figure. One possible interpretation of the data is that rib strength changed little or not at all from 415 million…

  • Eocene Epoch (geochronology)

    Eocene Epoch, second of three major worldwide divisions of the Paleogene Period (66 million to 23 million years ago) that began 56 million years ago and ended 33.9 million years ago. It follows the Paleocene Epoch and precedes the Oligocene Epoch. The Eocene is often divided into Early (56 million

  • Eocene Series (stratigraphy)

    Eocene Series, second of three main divisions (in ascending order) in the Paleogene System, representing all those rocks on a global basis that were deposited during the Eocene Epoch (55.8–33.9 million years ago). It designates a subdivision proposed in 1833 by the Scottish geologist Charles Lyell

  • Eochaid Ollathair (Celtic deity)

    Dagda, (Celtic: “Good God”) in Celtic religion, one of the leaders of a mythological Irish people, the Tuatha Dé Danann (“People of the Goddess Danu”). The Dagda was credited with many powers and possessed a caldron that was never empty, fruit trees that were never barren, and two pigs—one live and

  • eocrinoid (fossil echinoderm)

    echinoderm: Annotated classification: ?Class Eocrinoidea Lower Cambrian to Silurian about 430,000,000–570,000,000 years ago; body usually consisting of stem, theca, and feeding brachioles. ?Class Blastoidea Silurian to Permian about 280,000,000–430,000,000 years ago; stem, theca with 18–21 plates arranged in 4 rings; numerous feeding brachioles; distinctive infoldings of theca (hydrospires)

  • Eocrinoidea (fossil echinoderm)

    echinoderm: Annotated classification: ?Class Eocrinoidea Lower Cambrian to Silurian about 430,000,000–570,000,000 years ago; body usually consisting of stem, theca, and feeding brachioles. ?Class Blastoidea Silurian to Permian about 280,000,000–430,000,000 years ago; stem, theca with 18–21 plates arranged in 4 rings; numerous feeding brachioles; distinctive infoldings of theca (hydrospires)

  • EOD (United States Army unit)

    improvised explosive device: Tactical use: Engineer Ordnance Disposal (EOD) experts disable or destroy IEDs through a variety of means, including the use of robotic ground vehicles and explosives.

  • Eodromaeus (dinosaur)

    theropod: …theropod is thought to be Eodromaeus, a 1.2-metre- (4-foot-) long dinosaur known from fossils discovered in northwestern Argentina that date to about 230 million years ago.

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