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  • Engle, Robert F. (American economist)

    Robert F. Engle, American economist, corecipient of the Nobel Prize for Economics in 2003 for his development of methods for analyzing time series data with time-varying volatility. He shared the award with Clive W.J. Granger. Engle received an M.S. (1966) and Ph.D. (1969) from Cornell University.

  • Englefield, Sir Francis (advisor to Mary I)

    Sir Francis Englefield, English Roman Catholic who was a personal friend and influential adviser to Queen Mary I and a vigorous opponent in exile of Queen Elizabeth I. During the reign of Henry VIII, Englefield accepted the principle of royal supremacy over the English church but rejected the

  • Engler, Adolf (German botanist)

    Adolf Engler, German botanist famous for his system of plant classification and for his expertise as a plant geographer. Engler obtained a Ph.D. from the University of Breslau (now Wroc?aw) in 1866. After four years of teaching he became, in 1871, custodian of botanical collections of the Botanical

  • Engler, Gustav Heinrich Adolf (German botanist)

    Adolf Engler, German botanist famous for his system of plant classification and for his expertise as a plant geographer. Engler obtained a Ph.D. from the University of Breslau (now Wroc?aw) in 1866. After four years of teaching he became, in 1871, custodian of botanical collections of the Botanical

  • Englert, Fran?ois (Belgian physicist)

    Fran?ois Englert, Belgian physicist who was awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize for Physics for proposing the existence of the Higgs field, which endows all elementary particles with mass through its interactions with them. He shared the prize with British physicist Peter Higgs, who hypothesized that the

  • Englewood (New Jersey, United States)

    Englewood, city, Bergen county, northeastern New Jersey, U.S. It lies across the Hudson River from the Bronx, New York City. Founded in 1647 as part of Hackensack, it was detached for urban development as the township of Englewood in 1871 and incorporated as a city in 1899. Englewood is mainly

  • Englewood (Colorado, United States)

    Englewood, city, Arapahoe county, north-central Colorado, U.S., on the South Platte River, immediately south of Denver. In 1858 a gold placer deposit, one of the first in Colorado, was discovered nearby. Englewood was formed from the settlement of Orchard Place in 1875, and it developed as an

  • Englisc (language)

    Angle: …well as to the word Englisc, used even by Saxon writers to denote their vernacular tongue. The Angles are first mentioned by Tacitus (1st century ce) as worshippers of the deity Nerthus. According to the Venerable Bede in the Ecclesiastical History of the English People, their Continental homeland was centred…

  • Englische Geschichte, vornehmlich im sechzehnten und siebzehnten Jahrhundert (work by Ranke)

    Leopold von Ranke: The search for objectivity.: … 1852); and, in 1859–69, the Englische Geschichte, vornehmlich im sechzehnten und siebzehnten Jahrhundert (A History of England Principally in the Seventeenth Century, 1875)—each consisting of several volumes that, although partly rendered obsolete by later research, are still worth reading today for their great narrative skill. In these works, too, Ranke…

  • Englische Kom?dianten (acting troupe)

    Englische Kom?dianten, (German: “English Comedians”) any of the troupes of English actors who toured the German-speaking states during the late 16th and the 17th centuries, exerting an important influence on the embryonic German drama and bringing with them many versions of popular Elizabethan and

  • Englischhorn (musical instrument)

    English horn, orchestral woodwind instrument, a large oboe pitched a fifth below the ordinary oboe, with a bulbous bell and, at the top end, a bent metal crook on which the double reed is placed. It is pitched in F, being written a fifth higher than it sounds. Its compass is from the E below middle

  • English (people)

    England: Ethnic groups and languages: …main ethnic stem of the English: the Anglo-Saxons, who invaded and colonized England in the 5th and 6th centuries. Their language provides the most commonly used words in the modern English vocabulary.

  • English Anacreon (English poet)

    Alexander Brome, Royalist poet who wrote drinking songs and satirical verses against the Rump Parliament in England. Brome was probably an attorney in the Lord Mayor’s Court or the Court of King’s Bench. Izaak Walton wrote an introductory eclogue to Brome’s Songs and Other Poems (1661), a volume of

  • English and Scottish Popular Ballads, The (compilation by Child)

    Francis J. Child: …final collection was published as The English and Scottish Popular Ballads, first in 10 parts (1882–98) and then in 5 quarto volumes, containing 305 ballads. Few significant additions have been made since, and Child’s collection remains the authoritative treasury.

  • English as a Second Language (education)
  • English Baptist Missionary Society (religious organization)

    William Carey: …Shrirampur], India), founder of the English Baptist Missionary Society (1792), lifelong missionary to India, and educator whose mission at Shrirampur (Serampore) set the pattern for modern missionary work. He has been called the “father of Bengali prose” for his grammars, dictionaries, and translations.

  • English Bards and Scotch Reviewers (poem by Byron)

    English Bards and Scotch Reviewers, satire in verse by Lord Byron, first published anonymously in 1809. The poem was written in response to the adverse criticism that The Edinburgh Review had given Hours of Idleness (1807), Byron’s first published volume of poetry. In English Bards and Scotch

  • English Bazar (India)

    Ingraj Bazar, city, north-central West Bengal state, northeastern India. It lies on the west bank of the Mahananda River. The city was chosen as the site of the British East India Company’s silk factories (trading stations) in 1676. The Dutch and French also had settlements there. It was

  • English Beat, the (British musical group)

    Two-Tone Movement: …and the Beat (called the English Beat in the United States) split to become General Public and the Fine Young Cannibals. The legacy of 2-Tone would be explored during the American ska revival of the late 1990s. During the heyday of 2-Tone, and a little farther north, in Birmingham, another…

  • English billiards (game)

    English billiards, game that is a type of billiards

  • English bluebell (plant)

    bluebell: …clusters of English bluebell, or wild hyacinth (Hyacinthoides non-scripta), and Spanish bluebell (H. hispanica) are borne on plants about 30 cm (1 foot) tall. Both species are cultivated as garden ornamentals.

  • English bond (masonry)

    English bond, form of bonding courses of stones or bricks in walling. See

  • English broom (plant)

    broom: English, or Scotch, broom (Cytisus scoparius) is a shrub with bright yellow flowers and is often grown for erosion control in warm climates.

  • English bulldog (breed of dog)

    Bulldog, breed of dog developed centuries ago in Great Britain for use in fighting bulls (bullbaiting). Characteristically powerful and courageous, often vicious, and to a great extent unaware of pain, the bulldog nearly disappeared when dogfighting was outlawed in 1835. Fanciers of the breed,

  • English chamomile (plant)

    chamomile: …English, or Roman, chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile) or German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla). Several species are cultivated as garden ornamentals, especially golden marguerite, or yellow chamomile (Cota tinctoria).

  • English Channel (channel, Europe)

    English Channel, narrow arm of the Atlantic Ocean separating the southern coast of England from the northern coast of France and tapering eastward to its junction with the North Sea at the Strait of Dover (French: Pas de Calais). With an area of some 29,000 square miles (75,000 square km), it is

  • English Channel history

    Queen Victoria welcomed an early proposal for a tunnel under the English Channel "in the name of all the ladies in England." Nearly 140 years later the tunnel is open, and its top selling point is still the gratifying lack of motion in the seabed rocks that envelop it. Off the coast of Normandy, on

  • English Civil Wars (English history)

    English Civil Wars, (1642–51), fighting that took place in the British Isles between supporters of the monarchy of Charles I (and his son and successor, Charles II) and opposing groups in each of Charles’s kingdoms, including Parliamentarians in England, Covenanters in Scotland, and Confederates in

  • English Classics (English horse race)

    English Classics, in horse racing, five of the oldest and most important English horse races. They are the Derby, the Oaks, the One Thousand Guineas, the Saint Leger, and the Two Thousand Guineas

  • English cocker spaniel (breed of dog)

    cocker spaniel: The English cocker spaniel is similar to the American cocker spaniel but is larger and has longer legs and a longer muzzle. It stands 15 to 17 inches (38 to 43 cm) and weighs 26 to 34 pounds (12 to 15 kg). It has a medium-length,…

  • English College (heraldic institution, London, United Kingdom)

    College of Arms, corporation of the royal heralds of England and Wales. After the Court of Lord Lyon (the heraldic corporation of Scotland), it is the oldest active heraldic institution in Europe. The college investigates, records, and advises on the use of coats of arms (armorial bearings), royal

  • English Comedians (acting troupe)

    Englische Kom?dianten, (German: “English Comedians”) any of the troupes of English actors who toured the German-speaking states during the late 16th and the 17th centuries, exerting an important influence on the embryonic German drama and bringing with them many versions of popular Elizabethan and

  • English Comic Writers (work by Hazlitt)

    comedy: The human contradiction: …“On Wit and Humour” in English Comic Writers (1819), “Man is the only animal that laughs and weeps; for he is the only animal that is struck with the difference between what things are, and what they ought to be.”

  • English Constitution, The (work by Bagehot)

    constitution: Constitutional stability: …wrote a classic analysis of the English constitution (The English Constitution), stressed the “deferential” character of the English people, who were quite happy to leave government in the hands of the governing class.

  • English croquet

    Association croquet, lawn game in which players use wooden mallets to hit balls through a series of wire hoops, or wickets, with a central peg as the ultimate goal. It is played on an organized basis in the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Australia, and South Africa. (For the origins of the game and

  • English daisy (plant)

    daisy: The English daisy, B. perennis, is often used as a bedding plant. It has numerous spoon-shaped, slightly hairy leaves near its base that form a rosette. The plant has leafless flower stalks and hairy bracts (leaflike structures) below the flower heads. Some varieties of the English…

  • English Dance of Death, The (work by Combe and Rowlandson)

    William Combe: …and Rowlandson also collaborated on The English Dance of Death (1815), which contains some of Combe’s best verse, and The Dance of Life (1816–17).

  • English Dancing-Master, The (work by Playford)

    country dance: …and courtly: Italian (15th–16th century), English (16th–19th century), and French (18th century). The chief English source is John Playford’s The English Dancing Master of 1650, continued in additional volumes until 1728 and critically revised in 1957 by M.J. Dean-Smith.

  • English Decorated style (architecture)

    Gothic art: High Gothic: …the Continent and as the Decorated Gothic (1300–75) style in England. This style was characterized by the application of increasingly elaborate geometrical decoration to the structural forms that had been established during the preceding century.

  • English Dialect Dictionary (compilation by Wright)

    dictionary: Specialized dictionaries: …collecting culminated in the splendid English Dialect Dictionary of Joseph Wright in six volumes (1898–1905). American regional speech was collected from 1774 onward; John Pickering first put a glossary of Americanisms into a separate book in 1816. The American Dialect Society, founded in 1889, made extensive collections, with plans for…

  • English Dictionary: or, an Interpreter of Hard English Words, The (compilation by Cockeram)

    dictionary: From 1604 to 1828: …word dictionary in its title: The English Dictionary; or, An Interpreter of Hard English Words. It added many words that have never appeared anywhere else—adpugne, adstupiate, bulbitate, catillate, fraxate, nixious, prodigity, vitulate, and so on. Much fuller than its predecessors was Thomas Blount’s work of 1656, Glossographia; or, A Dictionary…

  • English East India Company (English trading company)

    East India Company, English company formed for the exploitation of trade with East and Southeast Asia and India, incorporated by royal charter on December 31, 1600. Starting as a monopolistic trading body, the company became involved in politics and acted as an agent of British imperialism in India

  • English elm (tree)

    elm: Major species: …species with interesting mottled bark; English elm (U. procera), with a compact crown and deeply fissured bark; Wych elm (U. glabra), with smoother bark; and Camperdown elm (U. glabra camperdownii), a variety of Wych elm also known as umbrella elm because of its drooping branches. The fast-growing Siberian elm (U.…

  • English Expositor, An (compilation by Bullokar)

    dictionary: From 1604 to 1828: …next dictionary, by John Bullokar, An English Expositor, is first heard of on May 25, 1610, when it was entered in the Stationers’ Register (which established the printer’s right to it), but it was not printed until six years later. Bullokar introduced many archaisms, marked with a star (“only used…

  • English finish (paper)

    papermaking: Book paper: English finish is a step higher in the book paper scale; this finish is distinguished from machine finish by a higher degree of stack beating, by greater pressure between the rollers of a machine calender, and by calendering at a greater moisture content of the…

  • English flageolet (musical instrument)

    flageolet: The English flageolet is a late 18th-century adaptation of the French form, with six front finger holes and, sometimes, keywork. Flageolets were often built as double pipes (the English also as triple pipes), all with a single mouthpiece.

  • English Folk-Songs from the Southern Appalachians (work by Sharp and Campbell)

    Cecil Sharp: His other published works include English Folk-Songs from the Southern Appalachians, with Olive Dame Campbell (1917); English Folk Songs (1921); The Morris Book (5 parts; 1907–13); The Country Dance Book (6 parts; 1909–22); and Sword Dances of Northern England (5 parts; 1911–13). Cecil Sharp House was established in London in…

  • English Football League (British soccer organization)

    English Football League (EFL), English professional football (soccer) organization. The league was formed in 1888, largely through the efforts of William McGregor, known afterward as the “father of the league.” Twelve of the strongest professional clubs of the time joined in the league, and the

  • English furnace (technology)

    industrial glass: Glass melting: …17th century, cone-shaped, or “English,” glass furnaces using coal as fuel appeared. The cones rose as high as 35 metres and were 10 to 12 metres in diameter. In these furnaces, covered pots for glass melting were placed on a middle level slightly below the ground, and an underground…

  • English garden (garden)

    English garden, type of garden that developed in 18th-century England, originating as a revolt against the architectural garden, which relied on rectilinear patterns, sculpture, and the unnatural shaping of trees. The revolutionary character of the English garden lay in the fact that, whereas

  • English Gentleman, The (work by Brathwaite)

    Richard Brathwaite: …as a country gentleman, writing The English Gentleman (1630) and The English Gentlewoman (1631), books on social conduct that are of interest to the social historian. He also wrote the lively Barnabee’s Journal (originally written in Latin rhymed verse under the pseudonym Corymbaeus; Eng. trans. 1638), containing amusing topographical information…

  • English Gentlewoman, The (work by Brathwaite)

    Richard Brathwaite: …The English Gentleman (1630) and The English Gentlewoman (1631), books on social conduct that are of interest to the social historian. He also wrote the lively Barnabee’s Journal (originally written in Latin rhymed verse under the pseudonym Corymbaeus; Eng. trans. 1638), containing amusing topographical information and unflagging gaiety.

  • English gooseberry (shrub)

    gooseberry: English gooseberries (R. uva-crispa), popularly called grossularia, are native to the Old World and have long been cultivated for fruit. In Europe the large-fruited cultivated gooseberries became naturalized. Grossularia do not prosper in the United States, because they are susceptible to mildews and rusts. Because…

  • English Grammar (work by Jonson)

    punctuation: Punctuation in English since 1600: …was Ben Jonson, in his English Grammar, a work composed about 1617 and published posthumously in 1640, who first recommended syntactic punctuation in England. An early example is the 1625 edition of Francis Bacon’s Essayes; and from the Restoration onward syntactic punctuation was in general use. Influential treatises on syntactic…

  • English holly (plant)

    holly: Major species: English holly (I. aquifolium), a tree growing to 15 metres (nearly 50 feet) tall, bears shining spiny dark evergreen leaves and usually red fruits. The somewhat taller American holly (I. opaca) has oblong prickly leaves and usually red fruits. There are spineless and yellow-fruited forms…

  • English horn (musical instrument)

    English horn, orchestral woodwind instrument, a large oboe pitched a fifth below the ordinary oboe, with a bulbous bell and, at the top end, a bent metal crook on which the double reed is placed. It is pitched in F, being written a fifth higher than it sounds. Its compass is from the E below middle

  • English Hymnal, The (music collection)

    hymn: …English poet Robert Bridges, and The English Hymnal (1906), edited by Percy Dearmer and the composer Ralph Vaughan Williams; the latter includes many plainsong and folk melodies.

  • English iris (plant)

    Iris: English iris (I. xiphioides), so named because of its popularity in British horticulture, bears bright blue flowers. Dutch irises are sturdier, earlier-flowering hybrids created in the Netherlands.

  • English ivy (plant)

    ivy: …especially denotes the commonly grown English ivy (H. helix), which climbs by aerial roots with adhering disks that develop on the stems. English ivy is frequently planted to clothe brick walls. The stems bear leaves with three to five lobes; as the stems reach the top of their support, they…

  • English Journey; or, the Road to Milton Keynes (work by Bainbridge)

    Dame Beryl Bainbridge: English Journey; or, The Road to Milton Keynes (1984) is a diary she kept in 1983 during the filming of a television series for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). She also published Front Row: Evenings at the Theatre: Pieces from the Oldie (2005), a collection…

  • English language

    English language, West Germanic language of the Indo-European language family that is closely related to Frisian, German, and Dutch (in Belgium called Flemish) languages. English originated in England and is the dominant language of the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Ireland,

  • English lavender (plant)

    Lamiaceae: Also Mediterranean is lavender (Lavandula officinalis), with fragrant blue to lavender flowers in leafless spikes. Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) was once used as a curative herb.

  • English law

    constitution: Great Britain: The English constitution and the English common law grew up together, very gradually, more as the result of the accretion of custom than through deliberate, rational legislation by some “sovereign” lawgiver. Parliament grew out of the Curia Regis, the King’s Council, in which the monarch originally…

  • English literature

    English literature, the body of written works produced in the English language by inhabitants of the British Isles (including Ireland) from the 7th century to the present day. The major literatures written in English outside the British Isles are treated separately under American literature,

  • English Literature and Society in the Eighteenth Century (work by Stephen)

    Sir Leslie Stephen: Stephen’s English Literature and Society in the Eighteenth Century (1904) was a pioneer work in the sociological study of literature.

  • English longbow (weapon)

    military technology: The English longbow: The longbow evolved during the 12th century in response to the demands of siege and guerrilla operations in the Welsh Marches, a topographically close and economically marginal area that was in many ways similar to the regions in which the crossbow had evolved…

  • English Madrigal School, The (collection edited by Fellowes)

    John Wilbye: …volumes 6 and 7 of The English Madrigal School, edited by E.H. Fellowes, 1913–24, and revised by Thurston Dart, 1965–68). Wilbye’s achievement lies in the grave music of his “serious” madrigals, a style then largely unpracticed in England. The “new poetry” of the Italianizing poets Sir Philip Sidney and Edmund…

  • English manner (musical style)

    John Dunstable: …what they learned from Dunstable’s “English manner.”

  • English midland hawthorn (plant)

    hawthorn: Common species: …make ideal hedges are the common hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) and the smooth hawthorn, also known as whitethorn, (C. laevigata). The smooth hawthorn has given rise to several cultivated varieties with showier flower clusters in pink and red, though it and other ornamental species often suffer from leaf spot, fire blight,…

  • English Midlands (region, England, United Kingdom)

    Midlands, region of central England, commonly subdivided into the East and the West Midlands. The East Midlands includes the historic and geographic counties of Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire, Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire, and Rutland. The West Midlands comprises Staffordshire,

  • English monkey (monkey)

    uakari: The white, or bald, uakari (C. calvus calvus) is a different colour form of the same species. It has whitish fur and lives only in the Mamirauá Sustainable Development Reserve along the upper Amazon in Brazil. Because of its vermilion face, local people call it the…

  • English muffin (food)

    crumpet: (American-invented English muffins, on the other hand, are firmer and more breadlike, cooked on both sides, and split before toasting.) Before being served, crumpets are toasted, generously buttered, and often sprinkled with a pinch of salt. They may be topped with a poached egg or a…

  • English National Ballet (British ballet company)

    English National Ballet, British dance troupe. Organized in 1950 by Alicia Markova, Anton Dolin, and Julian Braunsweg with a corps de ballet drawn chiefly from the Cone-Ripman School in London and at Tring, Hertford, the troupe performs at locations throughout Great Britain and conducts world

  • English oak (tree)

    English oak, (Quercus robur), ornamental and timber tree of the beech family (Fagaceae) that is native to Eurasia but also cultivated in North America and Australia. The tree has a short, stout trunk with wide-spreading branches and may grow to a height of 25 m (82.5 feet). The short-stalked l

  • English Patient, The (film by Minghella [1996])

    The English Patient, British-American film, released in 1996, that won glowing reviews and nine Academy Awards, including that for best picture. It also won four BAFTA Awards, including best picture, as well as the Golden Globe Award for best drama. The movie is set in the years before and during

  • English Patient, The (work by Ondaatje)

    Canadian literature: Fiction: …during World War II (The English Patient, 1992; Booker Prize) and Sri Lanka wracked by civil war (Anil’s Ghost, 2000), Ondaatje’s lyrical, elliptical narratives spotlight a small coterie of people drawn together by a mystery that shapes the story and governs their lives.

  • English Poets and Scotch Reviewers (poem by Byron)

    English literature: The later Romantics: Shelley, Keats, and Byron: …gauntlet in his early poem English Bards and Scotch Reviewers (1809), in which he directed particular scorn at poets of sensibility and declared his own allegiance to Milton, Dryden, and Pope, he developed a poetry of dash and flair, in many cases with a striking hero. His two longest poems,…

  • English pointer (breed of dog)

    Pointer, highly regarded breed of sporting dog of hound, spaniel, and setter ancestry. The pointer derives its name from its assumption of a rigid posture in the direction of the quarry it has located. First recorded about 1650, in England, the pointer was originally used to point out hares for

  • English porcelain (pottery)

    Ironstone china, type of stoneware introduced in England early in the 19th century by Staffordshire potters who sought to develop a porcelain substitute that could be mass-produced. The result of their experiments was a dense, hard, durable stoneware that came to be known by several names—e.g.,

  • English Pronouncing Dictionary, An (compilation by Jones)

    dictionary: Specialized dictionaries: That of Daniel Jones, An English Pronouncing Dictionary, claimed to represent that “most usually heard in everyday speech in the families of Southern English persons whose men-folk have been educated at the great public boarding-schools.” Although he called this the Received Pronunciation (RP), he had no intention of imposing…

  • English Public Record Act (United Kingdom [1838])

    archives: The English Public Record Act of 1838 brought all separate collections together and placed them under the Public Record Office (later part of the National Archives). England, therefore, is the outstanding example of centralization, whereas the more usual practice, as already suggested, is decentralization of archives…

  • English Reprints (work by Arber)

    Edward Arber: His English Reprints, 30 vol. (1868–71), began with a sixpenny edition of Milton’s Areopagitica. Later series include the important English Garner, 8 vol. (1877–96), and The English Scholar’s Library of Old and Modern Works, 16 vol. (1878–84). Also valuable are his Transcript of the Registers of…

  • English Revised Version, The (Bible)

    biblical literature: The English Revised Version: The remarkable and total victory of the King James Version could not entirely obscure those inherent weaknesses that were independent of its typographical errors. The manner of its execution had resulted in a certain unevenness and lack of consistency. Because the…

  • English riots of 2011 (British history)

    London: Reconstruction after World War II: …August 2011 a wave of riots swept the city after police shot and killed a 29-year-old man who was suspected of involvement with gun-related crimes. What began as a peaceful gathering at the police station in the Tottenham neighbourhood soon spiraled into violence. Over the following days, dozens of fires…

  • English River (river, Ontario, Canada)

    Precambrian: Structure and occurrence of granulite-gneiss belts: …supracrustals of southern India, the English River gneisses of Ontario in Canada that form a narrow strip between greenstone-granite belts, the Sand River gneisses that occupy a small area between greenstone-granite belts in Zimbabwe, and the Napier Complex in Enderby Land in Antarctica. Granulite-gneiss belts are commonly surrounded

  • English Romayne Lyfe (work by Munday)

    Anthony Munday: Critics have found his English Romayne Lyfe (1582) of permanent interest as a detailed and entertaining, though hostile, description of life and study in the English College at Rome. By 1586 he had been appointed one of the “messengers of her majesty’s chamber,” a post he seems to have…

  • English round hand (calligraphy)

    Copperplate script, in calligraphy, dominant style among 18th-century writing masters, whose copybooks were splendidly printed from models engraved on copper. The alphabet was fundamentally uncomplicated, but the basic strokes were often concealed in luxuriant flourishing and dazzling professional

  • English saddle (riding equipment)

    saddle: The English, or Hungarian, saddle is lighter, flatter, and padded and was designed for sport and recreational uses.

  • English school (painting)

    English school, dominant school of painting in England throughout the second half of the 18th century and the first half of the 19th. Its establishment marked the rise of a national tradition that began with the emergence of native artists whose works were no longer provincial but rivaled

  • English Schoolmaster, Teaching All His Scholars of What Age Soever the Most Easy Short & Perfect Order of Distinct Readinge & True Writing Our English Tongue, The (work by Coote)

    dictionary: From Classical times to 1604: Edmund’s, in 1596 brought out The English Schoolmaster, Teaching All His Scholars of What Age Soever the Most Easy Short & Perfect Order of Distinct Reading & True Writing Our English Tongue, with a table that consisted of about 1,400 words, sorted out by different typefaces on the basis of…

  • English setter (breed of dog)

    English setter, breed of sporting dog that has served as a gun dog in England for more than 400 years and has been bred in its present form since about 1825. It is sometimes called the Llewellin setter or the Laverack setter for the developers of two strains of the breed. Like the other setters, it

  • English Settled Land Acts (United Kingdom [1882, 1890, 1925])

    property law: Marxism, liberalism, and the law: The English Settled Land Acts (1882, 1890, 1925) gave considerably more power to the present holder of settled land than the common law had given him. The Married Women’s Property Acts in both countries (originating in the United States in 1839 and in England in 1857)…

  • English sonnet (poetic form)

    sonnet: …other major form is the English (or Shakespearean) sonnet.

  • English sparrow (bird)

    House sparrow, (Passer domesticus), one of the world’s best-known and most abundant small birds, sometimes classified in the family Passeridae (order Passeriformes). It lives in towns and on farms, worldwide, having accompanied Europeans from its original home—most of Eurasia and northern Africa.

  • English springer spaniel (breed of dog)

    springer spaniel: The English springer spaniel is a medium-sized, compact dog standing 19 to 20 inches (48 to 51 cm) and weighing 40 to 50 pounds (18 to 23 kg). Its glossy coat is flat or wavy and usually black and white or liver-coloured and white. The English…

  • English style (garden)

    English garden, type of garden that developed in 18th-century England, originating as a revolt against the architectural garden, which relied on rectilinear patterns, sculpture, and the unnatural shaping of trees. The revolutionary character of the English garden lay in the fact that, whereas

  • English sweat (disease)

    Sweating sickness, a disease of unknown cause that appeared in England as an epidemic on five occasions—in 1485, 1508, 1517, 1528, and 1551. It was confined to England, except in 1528–29, when it spread to the European continent, appearing in Hamburg and passing northward to Scandinavia and

  • English sweating sickness (disease)

    Sweating sickness, a disease of unknown cause that appeared in England as an epidemic on five occasions—in 1485, 1508, 1517, 1528, and 1551. It was confined to England, except in 1528–29, when it spread to the European continent, appearing in Hamburg and passing northward to Scandinavia and

  • English Teacher, The (film by Zisk [2013])

    Julianne Moore: Movies of the early 21st century: …later films included the dramedy The English Teacher (2013); Carrie (2013), a horror film based on Stephen King’s classic novel; Non-Stop (2014), an action thriller set on an airplane; and The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 (2014) and The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 (2015), adaptations of a young-adult novel…

  • English toy spaniel (breed of dog)

    English toy spaniel, breed of dog known in Britain since Tudor times but that apparently originated in ancient Japan or China. It was favoured by Mary, Queen of Scots, King Charles II (after whom it was named the King Charles spaniel), and Queen Victoria, as well as by members of the aristocracy.

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