You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • EKC (pathology)

    adenovirus: Adenoviruses can also cause epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) and are considered to be responsible for an outbreak of respiratory disease among military recruits in 1997. Like the cold viruses, adenoviruses are often found in latent infections in clinically healthy persons. Of the 47 different adenovirus species, only a few commonly cause…

  • EKD (church, Germany)

    The Evangelical Church in Germany, federation of Lutheran, Reformed, and United (a combination of Lutheran and Reformed) territorial churches in Germany. Organized in 1948 after the difficult years of the Nazi era (1933–45), it helped the German Protestant churches restore themselves, and it

  • Ekeberg, Anders Gustav (Swedish chemist)

    Anders Gustav Ekeberg, Swedish chemist who in 1802 discovered the element tantalum. After graduation from the University of Uppsala (1788) and travels in Germany, Ekeberg returned to Uppsala and began teaching (1794), introducing the chemistry of Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier. Though he was partly deaf

  • Ekeblad, Eva (Swedish aristocrat and agronomist)

    Eva Ekeblad, Swedish aristocrat and agronomist who was best known for her work involving potatoes, notably developing (1746) methods for both distilling alcohol and making flour from the tuber. She was born into nobility, and in 1741, at age 16, she married Count Claes Claesson Ekeblad, a

  • Ekecheiria

    The Olympic Truce: The creation of the Ekecheiria, the Olympic truce, lies within the traditional story of the founding of the ancient Olympic Games. Two warring kings of the area around Olympia, Iphitos and Cleomenes, joined with the Spartan lawgiver Lycurgus in an agreement to hold the Games…

  • Ekel?f, Gunnar (Swedish poet)

    Gunnar Ekel?f, outstanding Swedish poet and essayist. Ekel?f exerted great influence on his contemporaries. His radically modern style was influenced by such poets as Charles Baudelaire, Arthur Rimbaud, Ezra Pound, and T.S. Eliot. In such poetry from the 1930s as Sent p? jorden (1932; “Late on

  • Ekelund, Vilhelm (Swedish author)

    Swedish literature: Development of lyric poetry: One of the most notable, Vilhelm Ekelund, was in his youth the chief exponent of Symbolism in Sweden and later, as an author of aphorisms, exerted much influence on the development of literary modernism. Among the most popular poets were Dan Andersson, Birger Sj?berg, and Hjalmar Gullberg. In Gullberg’s poetry,…

  • Ekerot, Bengt (Swedish actor and director)

    The Seventh Seal: …the personification of Death (Bengt Ekerot) comes for him, the knight suggests a chess match with his life as the prize. Throughout the game Death interrupts the play in order to spread more calamities on the world without ever answering the knight’s almost desperate inquiries about the existence of…

  • Eket (people)

    Ibibio: (Eket), Delta (Andoni-Ibeno), Western (Anang), and Eastern (the Ibibio proper).

  • EKG (medicine)

    Electrocardiography, method of graphic tracing (electrocardiogram; ECG or EKG) of the electric current generated by the heart muscle during a heartbeat. The tracing is recorded with an electrocardiograph (actually a relatively simple string galvanometer), and it provides information on the

  • Ekhmīn (Egypt)

    Akhmīm, town, Sawhāj mu?āfa?ah (governorate), Upper Egypt, on the east bank of the Nile River, above Sawhāj on the west bank. Extensive necropolises dating from the 6th dynasty (c. 2325–c. 2150 bce) until the late Coptic period reveal the site’s antiquity. In 1981 remains of a temple (Roman period)

  • Ekhof, Hans Konrad Dieterich (German actor)

    Konrad Ekhof, actor and director who, with Caroline Neuber and Friedrich Schr?der, was a major influence in the development of a German theatrical tradition. In 1739 Ekhof became a member of the company managed by Johann Friedrich Sch?nemann, an association that extended over 17 years. Ekhof played

  • Ekhof, Konrad (German actor)

    Konrad Ekhof, actor and director who, with Caroline Neuber and Friedrich Schr?der, was a major influence in the development of a German theatrical tradition. In 1739 Ekhof became a member of the company managed by Johann Friedrich Sch?nemann, an association that extended over 17 years. Ekhof played

  • Ekibastuz (Kazakhstan)

    Ekibastuz, city and major opencut coal-mining centre in northeastern Kazakhstan, on the Ertis-Qaraghandy Canal. Coal was discovered in the region in 1876 and was mined on a small scale. Only after construction of a railway in 1953 did large-scale exploitation of Ekibastuz’s rich but low-grade coal

  • ekistics (sociology)

    Ekistics, science of human settlements. Ekistics involves the descriptive study of all kinds of human settlements and the formulation of general conclusions aimed at achieving harmony between the inhabitants of a settlement and their physical and sociocultural environments. Descriptive study

  • Ekkehard (work by Scheffel)

    Joseph Victor von Scheffel: …of S?ckingen”) and historical novel Ekkehard (1855) appealed to sentimental popular taste and made him one of the most widely read German authors of his time.

  • Ekkehard I of St. Gall (German monk and poet)

    Ekkehard I the Elder, teacher, monk, hymnist, and poet whom some scholars regard as the author of Waltharius, a celebrated Latin heroic poem based on the life of King Walter of Aquitaine. Of noble birth, Ekkehard was educated at the Benedictine monastery of Sankt Gallen (St. Gall) in Switzerland,

  • Ekkehard I the Elder (German monk and poet)

    Ekkehard I the Elder, teacher, monk, hymnist, and poet whom some scholars regard as the author of Waltharius, a celebrated Latin heroic poem based on the life of King Walter of Aquitaine. Of noble birth, Ekkehard was educated at the Benedictine monastery of Sankt Gallen (St. Gall) in Switzerland,

  • Ekkehard IV (German historian)

    Ekkehard IV, teacher, glossarist, writer, famous as one of the principal authors of Casus Sancti Galli (“The Events of Sankt Gallen [St. Gall]”)—an important history of the monastery. He grew up at Sankt Gallen, being educated by the celebrated German scholar Notker Labeo, Ekkehard I’s nephew. From

  • Ekkehart I of St. Gall (German monk and poet)

    Ekkehard I the Elder, teacher, monk, hymnist, and poet whom some scholars regard as the author of Waltharius, a celebrated Latin heroic poem based on the life of King Walter of Aquitaine. Of noble birth, Ekkehard was educated at the Benedictine monastery of Sankt Gallen (St. Gall) in Switzerland,

  • Ekkehart I the Elder (German monk and poet)

    Ekkehard I the Elder, teacher, monk, hymnist, and poet whom some scholars regard as the author of Waltharius, a celebrated Latin heroic poem based on the life of King Walter of Aquitaine. Of noble birth, Ekkehard was educated at the Benedictine monastery of Sankt Gallen (St. Gall) in Switzerland,

  • Ekklesia (ancient Greek assembly)

    Ecclesia, (“gathering of those summoned”), in ancient Greece, assembly of citizens in a city-state. Its roots lay in the Homeric agora, the meeting of the people. The Athenian Ecclesia, for which exists the most detailed record, was already functioning in Draco’s day (c. 621 bc). In the course of

  • Ekklesiazousai (play by Aristophanes)

    Women at the Ecclesia, drama by Aristophanes, performed about 392 bce. One of Aristophanes’ less-appealing plays, it treats the takeover by the women of Athens of the Ecclesia, the Athenian democratic assembly. They carry out this mission dressed as men, and, once they have achieved their goal,

  • ekkyklema (Greek theatre)

    Eccyclema, in classical Greek theatre, stage mechanism consisting of a low platform that rolled on wheels or revolved on an axis and could be pushed onstage to reveal an interior or some offstage scene such as a tableau. It was introduced to the Attic stage in the 5th century to provide directors

  • Ekloge ek ton ekklesiastikon historion (work by Theodorus Lector)

    Theodorus Lector: …known by its Latin title Historia tripartita because it derived from three separate 5th-century chronicles, those of Socrates Scholasticus, Sozomen, and Theodoret of Cyrrhus. The Eklogē recounts in four books the fortunes of the church from 313, early in the reign of the emperor Constantine the Great, to the year…

  • Ekman current meter (oceanography)

    V. Walfrid Ekman: The Ekman current meter, an instrument with a simple and reliable mechanism, has been used, with subsequent improvements, to the present, while the Ekman reversing water bottle is used in freshwater lakes and sometimes in the ocean to obtain water samples at different depths with a…

  • Ekman layer (oceanography)

    Ekman layer, a vertical region of the ocean affected by the movement of wind-driven surface waters. This layer, named for the Swedish oceanographer V. Walfrid Ekman, extends to a depth of about 100 metres (about 300 feet). Ekman deduced the layer’s existence in 1902 from the results obtained from a

  • Ekman reversing water bottle (oceanography)

    V. Walfrid Ekman: …to the present, while the Ekman reversing water bottle is used in freshwater lakes and sometimes in the ocean to obtain water samples at different depths with a simultaneous measurement of water temperatures. He displayed his theoretical and experimental talents in his study of so-called dead water, which causes slow-moving…

  • Ekman spiral (oceanography)

    Ekman spiral, theoretical displacement of current direction by the Coriolis effect, given a steady wind blowing over an ocean of infinite depth, extent, and uniform eddy viscosity. According to the concept proposed by the 20th-century Swedish oceanographer V.W. Ekman, the surface layers are

  • Ekman transport (oceanography)

    ocean current: Ekman layer: This phenomenon is called Ekman transport, and its effects are widely observed in the oceans.

  • Ekman, G?sta (Swedish actor)

    G?sta Ekman, Swedish actor and director noted for his versatility on stage and screen. Ekman premiered in 1906 at Stockholm’s Oscar Theatre and, after an apprenticeship on tour and in the provinces, returned to Stockholm (1913) to win acclaim for his classic portrayals, such as Lionel in Friedrich

  • Ekman, Kerstin (Swedish author)

    Swedish literature: Political writing: Kerstin Ekman, initially a writer of detective novels, came to prominence with her meticulously documented Katrineholm series, which chronicled the lives of women in small-town Sweden. Another author who shed light on the underprivileged and socially defenseless, this time in the nation’s capital, was Heidi…

  • Ekman, Paul (American psychologist)

    lying: The psychology of lying: American psychologist Paul Ekman showed that people who are good at detecting mendacity pay careful attention to nonverbal cues. Fleeting alterations in the speaker’s facial expression (“microexpressions”) are especially revealing. Ekman also showed that subjects can be taught to recognize and interpret microexpressions, a skill that results…

  • Ekman, V. Walfrid (Swedish scientist)

    V. Walfrid Ekman, Swedish physical oceanographer best known for his studies of the dynamics of ocean currents. The common oceanographic terms Ekman layer, denoting certain oceanic or atmospheric layers occurring at various interfaces; Ekman spiral, used in connection with vertical oceanic velocity;

  • Ekman, Vagn Walfrid (Swedish scientist)

    V. Walfrid Ekman, Swedish physical oceanographer best known for his studies of the dynamics of ocean currents. The common oceanographic terms Ekman layer, denoting certain oceanic or atmospheric layers occurring at various interfaces; Ekman spiral, used in connection with vertical oceanic velocity;

  • Eknath (Hindu poet-saint and mystic)

    Eknath, poet-saint and mystic of Vaishnavism, the branch of Hinduism that reveres the deity Vishnu and his avatars (incarnations). Eknath is best known for his translations of various Sanskrit texts into Marathi (the local language of the Maharashtra region of central India), his authorship of

  • Eko (island, Nigeria)

    Lagos: …city’s population is centred on Lagos Island, in Lagos Lagoon, on the Bight of Benin in the Gulf of Guinea. Lagos is Nigeria’s largest city and one of the largest in sub-Saharan Africa.

  • Ekofisk (oil field, Norway)

    Ekofisk, group of Norwegian offshore natural-gas and oil fields located in the North Sea about 180 miles (290 km) southwest of Norway, halfway between Norway and the United Kingdom. The Ekofisk district includes the Ekofisk field itself (1969; petroleum) and the original, relatively small

  • Ekoi (people)

    Ekoi, group of peoples situated in extreme southeastern Nigeria and extending eastward into neighbouring Cameroon. Ekoid Bantu languages are spoken by many groups, including the Atam, Boki, Mbembe, Ufia, and Yako. The Ekoi live in proximity to the Efiks of southeastern Nigeria and claim to have

  • Ekoid Bantu (people)

    Ekoi, group of peoples situated in extreme southeastern Nigeria and extending eastward into neighbouring Cameroon. Ekoid Bantu languages are spoken by many groups, including the Atam, Boki, Mbembe, Ufia, and Yako. The Ekoi live in proximity to the Efiks of southeastern Nigeria and claim to have

  • Ekottarikagama (Buddhist literature)

    miracle: India: According to the Anguttara Nikaya, one of the collections of the Buddha’s sayings, there are three kinds of miracles—the miracle of magic, the miracle of thought reading, and the miracle of instruction—and of these the last is the most wonderful and excellent, whereas the other two are not…

  • Ekpe society (African secret society)

    Calabar: …of Old Calabar by the Ekpe secret society, which was controlled by the towns’ merchant houses.

  • Ekpo (African secret society)

    Calabar: …of Old Calabar by the Ekpe secret society, which was controlled by the towns’ merchant houses.

  • ekpu (African figurine)

    African art: Ibibio: …several hundred ancestor figures, called ekpu, of the Ibibio coastal trade centre of Oron, some of which are thought to date from the late 18th century. They are bearded figures 3 to 4 feet (90 to 120 cm) high and are so individual as to suggest portraiture, despite their schematic…

  • Ekrem, Recaizade Mahmud (Turkish author)

    Recaizade Mahmud Ekrem, writer who was one of the outstanding figures in 19th-century Turkish literature. The son of a poet and scholar, Ekrem was apprenticed to a number of government offices after his formal education. Later he became an official in the Council of State and a teacher of Turkish

  • Ekron (ancient city, Israel)

    Ekron, ancient Canaanite and Philistine city, one of the five cities of the Philistine pentapolis, and currently identified with Tel Miqne (Arabic: Khirbat al-Muqanna?), south of the settlement of Mazkeret Batya, central Israel. Although it was allocated to Judah after the Israelite conquest

  • Ekstase (film by Machaty [1932])

    Gustav Machaty: …to Sunday), and Ekstase (1933; Ecstasy). The last—starring Hedy Kiesler (later Hedy Lamarr) as an unsatisfied wife in search of passion—made Machaty world famous but also brought him trouble with the enforcers of the Hays Production Code. Even absent its nudity and sexual content, which are tame by 21st-century standards,…

  • Ekster, Aleksandra Aleksandrovna (Russian artist)

    Aleksandra Aleksandrovna Ekster, Russian artist of international stature who divided her life between Kiev, St. Petersburg, Moscow, Vienna, and Paris, thus strengthening the cultural ties between Russia and Europe. In this way and through her own artistic achievement, she did much to further the

  • ekthesis (logic)

    Ekthesis, (Greek: “to expose,” or “to set forth”), in logic, process used by Aristotle to establish the validity of certain propositions or syllogisms. For example, in the Analytica priora he argued: “If A belongs to no B; neither will B belong to any A; for if it did belong to any A, say Γ

  • Ekuan, Kenji (Japanese designer)

    Kenji Ekuan, Japanese designer (born Sept. 11, 1929, Tokyo, Japan—died Feb. 8, 2015, Tokyo), created (1961) the form of the iconic red-capped, teardrop-shaped bottle for soy sauce maker Kikkoman Corp.; he was also known for having designed the Yamaha VMAX motorcycle, the Akita Shinkansen Komachi

  • Ekvthime Mthatzmideli (Eastern Orthodox monk)

    Euthymius The Hagiorite, monastic leader, scholar, and writer whose propagation of Greek culture and Eastern Orthodox tradition generated the golden age of Georgian education and literature. The son of a Georgian noble and court official, Euthymius accompanied his father into monastic retirement,

  • Ekwan (Korean Buddhist monk)

    Mādhyamika: …625 by the Korean monk Ekwan.

  • Ekwensi, Cyprian (Nigerian author)

    Cyprian Ekwensi, Igbo novelist, short-story writer, and children’s author whose strength lies in his realistic depiction of the forces that have shaped the African city dweller. Ekwensi was educated at Ibadan (Nigeria) University College and at the Chelsea School of Pharmacy in London. His early

  • Ekwensi, Cyprian Odiatu Duaka (Nigerian author)

    Cyprian Ekwensi, Igbo novelist, short-story writer, and children’s author whose strength lies in his realistic depiction of the forces that have shaped the African city dweller. Ekwensi was educated at Ibadan (Nigeria) University College and at the Chelsea School of Pharmacy in London. His early

  • El (Semitic deity)

    El, the general term for “deity” in Semitic languages as well as the name of the chief deity of the West Semites. In the ancient texts from Ras Shamra (ancient Ugarit) in Syria, El was described as the titular head of the pantheon, husband of Asherah, and father of all the other gods (except for

  • El Al Israel Airlines

    El Al Israel Airlines, Israeli airline founded by Israel in November 1948 after the establishment of the new nation. It flew its first commercial scheduled flights—to Rome and Paris—in July 1949, and by the 1980s it was flying routes from Jerusalem and Tel Aviv to many of the major cities of E

  • El Al Netive Awir Le-Yisra?el

    El Al Israel Airlines, Israeli airline founded by Israel in November 1948 after the establishment of the new nation. It flew its first commercial scheduled flights—to Rome and Paris—in July 1949, and by the 1980s it was flying routes from Jerusalem and Tel Aviv to many of the major cities of E

  • El Arbolillo (archaeological site, Mexico)

    Middle American Indian: The prehistoric period: …central valley of Mexico at El Arbolillo, Zacatenco, Tlatilco, and, finally, Ticoman. The same developmental sequence occurred in the Formative period of highland Guatemala, as shown in the excavations at Kaminaljuyú near Guatemala City.

  • El Argar (prehistoric culture)

    El Argar, culture characterized by a flourishing metallurgy of bronze, silver, and gold that appeared at the beginning of the 2nd millennium bc in the Almería (southeastern) region of the Iberian Peninsula. The culture, which developed a lively trade with centres in the eastern Mediterranean,

  • El Avila National Park (national park, Venezuela)

    Venezuela: Conservation: El Avila National Park (1958) is popular among hikers and campers from the Caracas area; including Naiguatá Peak and other formations in the Coastal Range, the park supports a variety of wildlife at elevations ranging from about 400 to more than 9,000 feet (120 to…

  • El Banco (Colombia)

    El Banco, city, northern Colombia, at the junction of the Magdalena and César rivers. The conquistador Gonzalo Jiménez de Quezada arrived at the site in 1537 and found the Indian village of Sompallón; he called it Barbudo (“Bearded One”) because of its bearded chief. In 1544 Alonzo de San Martín

  • El Bulli (restaurant, Roses, Spain)

    Ferran Adrià: …creative force behind the restaurant El Bulli (closed in 2011), pioneered the influential culinary trend known as molecular gastronomy, which uses precise scientific techniques to create inventive and evocative high-end cuisine. In the early 21st century many considered him the best chef in the world.

  • El Callao (Venezuela)

    El Callao, town, Bolívar estado (state), eastern Venezuela. It is situated on the right bank of the Yuruari River, about 135 miles (272 km) east-southeast of Ciudad Bolívar in the Venezuelan Guiana Highlands. The town has been a gold-mining centre since 1853, following the discovery of the metal in

  • El Capitan (mountain, California, United States)

    El Capitan, mountain in Yosemite National Park, east-central California. One of the park’s most notable landmarks, the granite monolith features nearly vertical walls and stands 7,569 feet (2,307 metres) above sea level and towers some 3,600 feet (1,100 metres) over the western end of Yosemite

  • El Cayo (Belize)

    San Ignacio, town, west-central Belize. It lies along the Belize River near the Guatemalan border. San Ignacio and its sister town Santa Elena make up Belize’s second largest urban area. The two towns are separated by the Macal River and Belize’s only suspension bridge. With Benque Viejo del

  • El Centro (California, United States)

    El Centro, city, seat (1907) of Imperial county, southeastern California, U.S. It lies 120 miles (200 km) east of San Diego and 10 miles (16 km) north of Mexicali, Mexico. A desert community located some 50 feet (15 metres) below sea level, it is the largest settlement below sea level in the United

  • El Cerrito (California, United States)

    El Cerrito, city, Contra Costa county, California, U.S. El Cerrito lies on the eastern shore of San Francisco Bay, north of Oakland and 15 miles (25 km) northeast of San Francisco via the San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge. The early village—named Rust for Wilhelm F. Rust, a German blacksmith and

  • El Chapo (Mexican criminal)

    Joaquín Guzmán, head of the Sinaloa drug cartel, one of the most powerful criminal organizations in Mexico from the late 20th century. Guzmán was born and raised in Badiraguato municipality, an impoverished and remote area of Sinaloa state in northwestern Mexico that was the birthplace of many

  • El Chichón (volcano, Mexico)

    Mount Pinatubo: …that thrown up by the El Chichón volcano (1982), making Pinatubo perhaps the largest eruption of the 20th century. Pinatubo erupted again in late August 1992, killing more than 72 people.

  • El Colegio Penstock Tunnel (tunnel, Colombia)

    tunnels and underground excavations: Heavy ground: The 5-mile, 14-foot El Colegio Penstock Tunnel in Colombia was completed in 1965 in bituminous shale, requiring the replacement and resetting of more than 2,000 rib sets, which buckled as the invert (bottom supports) and sides gradually squeezed in up to 3 feet, and by deferring concreting until…

  • El de Antequera (king of Aragon)

    Ferdinand I, king of Aragon from 1412 to 1416, second son of John I of Castile and Eleanor, daughter of Peter IV of Aragon. Because his elder brother, Henry III, was an invalid, Ferdinand took the battlefield against the Muslims of Granada. When Henry III died in 1406, his son John II was an infant

  • El de Las Navas (king of Castile)

    Alfonso VIII, king of Castile from 1158, son of Sancho III, whom he succeeded when three years old. Before Alfonso came of age his reign was troubled by internal strife and the intervention of the kingdom of Navarre in Castilian affairs. Throughout his reign he maintained a close alliance with the

  • El del Pu?al (king of Aragon)

    Peter IV, king of Aragon from January 1336, son of Alfonso IV. Peter was the most cultivated of Spanish 14th-century kings but was also an inveterate political intriguer whose ability to dissemble was notorious. Through his voluminous correspondence, the workings of his mind are far better known

  • El Dorado (Arkansas, United States)

    El Dorado, city, seat (1843) of Union county, southern Arkansas, U.S., 100 miles (160 km) south of Little Rock. The site was selected in 1843 by county commissioners Robert Black, John Hampton, and Green Newton, who were instructed to locate centrally the county seat. Its Spanish name (meaning

  • El Dorado (film by Hawks [1967])

    Howard Hawks: Final films: El Dorado (1967), with Caan, Wayne, and Robert Mitchum, was either a sequel to or a remake of Rio Bravo, with Mitchum in Martin’s role. Rio Lobo (1970), yet another variation on the formula, found Wayne supported by an odd cast that included Jennifer O’Neill…

  • El Dorado (album by Shakira)

    Shakira: …a duet with Rihanna, and El Dorado (2017), winner of the Grammy Award for best Latin pop album and the Latin Grammy for best contemporary pop vocal album. In addition, El Dorado featured the single “La bicicleta,” a duet with Carlos Vives that won Latin Grammys for best record of…

  • El Escorial (Spain)

    El Escorial, village, western Madrid provincia (province) and comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), central Spain, in the Guadarrama mountains, 26 miles (42 km) northwest of Madrid. It is the site of the Royal Monastery of San Lorenzo de El Escorial, a monastery originally Hieronymite but

  • El Escorial library (library, El Escorial, Spain)

    El Escorial: El Escorial library, founded by Philip II, houses a rare collection of more than 4,700 manuscripts, many of them illuminated, and 40,000 printed books. Pop. (2005) 13,768.

  • El Estor (Guatemala)

    Lake Izabal: …settlement on the shores is El Estor, which originated as the trading outpost of the United Fruit Company and whose name is derived from the English word store. Nickel has been mined near the lake.

  • El Ferrol (Spain)

    Ferrol, port city, A Coru?a provincia (province), in the northern section of the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Galicia, in extreme northwestern Spain. It is located on the Ferrol Inlet of the Atlantic Ocean. Named for a farol (lighthouse) that marked the entrance to its harbour, the

  • El Ferrol del Caudillo (Spain)

    Ferrol, port city, A Coru?a provincia (province), in the northern section of the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Galicia, in extreme northwestern Spain. It is located on the Ferrol Inlet of the Atlantic Ocean. Named for a farol (lighthouse) that marked the entrance to its harbour, the

  • El fondo del vaso (work by Ayala)

    Spanish literature: The novel: …Life, 1964] and its sequel El fondo del vaso [1962; “In the Bottom of the Glass”]), he cultivated themes that allowed him to obliquely re-create aspects of the Civil War as well as to address more-universal social concerns. These works offer devastating appraisals of the Spanish political scene from multiple…

  • El Gigante (tree, Oaxaca, Mexico)

    tree: Trees of special interest: …Mexican swamp cypress is “El Gigante,” located at Tule, Oaxaca. The trunk of this massive tree is buttressed and not circular; if the bays and promontories of the buttresses are followed, the basal circumference is nearly 46 metres (151 feet).

  • El Guerrouj, Hicham (Moroccan athlete)

    Hicham El Guerrouj, Moroccan middle-distance runner, who became the first man to hold world records in the mile and the 1,500-metre races both indoors and outdoors. El Guerrouj—inspired by the accomplishments of his countryman Said Aouita, a gold medalist in the 5,000 metres at the 1984 Los Angeles

  • El Jobo (archaeological site, Colombia)

    Native American art: Colombia: …have been found, notably at El Jobo, in Falcón, that date to about 14,920 bc. Carved stone was used for such objects as small pendants or fetishes; shell and bone are also known to have been used.

  • El Lahun (ancient site, Egypt)

    Al-Lāhūn, ancient Egyptian site, located southwest of Al-Fayyūm near the southward turn of the Ba?r Yūsuf canal in Al-Fayyūm mu?āfa?ah (governorate). Al-Lāhūn was the location of a Middle Kingdom (1938–c. 1630 bce) pyramid and of a workmen’s village of approximately the same date, and findings in

  • El Malpais National Monument (national monument, New Mexico, United States)

    El Malpais National Monument, high-valley lava flow area, Cibola county, west-central New Mexico, U.S., about 15 miles (24 km) southwest of Grants. The area covered by black lava flow extends about 133 square miles (344 square km), although the monument itself covers 179 square miles (464 square

  • El Monte (California, United States)

    El Monte, city, Los Angeles county, California, U.S. El Monte lies 12 miles (20 km) east of downtown Los Angeles. Spanish missionaries and soldiers inhabited the area in the 18th and early 19th centuries and named the location for its meadows (an archaic sense of the Spanish word monte). The site,

  • El Morro (fortress, San Juan, Puerto Rico)

    Puerto Rico: Early settlement: …San Felipe del Morro (El Morro) castle, which was perfectly located to dominate the narrow entrance to the harbour. Finally they added a stronger and larger fortress (San Cristóbal) to the northeast, on the Atlantic side of the city. In the early 17th century the city was surrounded by…

  • El Morro National Monument (national monument, New Mexico, United States)

    El Morro National Monument, rock formation and archaeological site in west-central New Mexico, U.S., 12 miles (19 km) southeast of Ramah. The monument was established in 1906 and has an area of 2 square miles (5 square km). El Morro (the “Headlands,” or “Bluff”), or Inscription Rock, is a soft

  • El Moutawakel, Nawal (Moroccan athlete)

    Morocco: Sports and recreation: …field events, one of whom—Nawal El Moutawakel in the 400 metre hurdles—was the first woman from an Arab or Islamic country to win an Olympic gold medal. Tennis and golf have also become popular. Several Moroccan professional players have competed in international competition, and the country fielded its first…

  • El Ni?o (oceanic and climatic phenomenon)

    El Ni?o, (Spanish: “The Christ Child”) in oceanography and climatology, the anomalous appearance, every few years, of unusually warm ocean conditions along the tropical west coast of South America. This event is associated with adverse effects on fishing, agriculture, and local weather from Ecuador

  • El Ni?o/Southern Oscillation (atmospheric phenomenon)

    Australia: Climate: …negative phases are related to El Ni?o episodes in the South Pacific, and most of Australia’s major droughts have been related to those episodes. Prolonged positive SOI phases (during La Ni?a) normally bring above-average rainfall and floods to eastern and northern Australia. In each case, however, the correlations are not…

  • El Oficio (prehistoric culture)

    Spain: Prehistory: …such as El Argar and El Oficio (Almería), where the richest women were adorned with silver diadems while their male consorts were equipped with bronze swords, axes, and polished pottery. At Fuente-álamo (Almería) the elite lived apart from the village, in square stone houses with round granaries and a water…

  • El Oriente (region, Ecuador)

    Oriente, region of eastern Ecuador, comprising the eastern slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes and the lowland areas of rainforest in the Amazon basin. It is bounded on the north by San Miguel and Putumayo rivers and on the east and south by Peru. Oriente has an area of about 50,000 square miles

  • El Panama Hotel (hotel, Panama City, Panama)

    Edward Durell Stone: …outside the United States are El Panamá Hotel, Panama City, Panama (1946), notable for its pioneering use of cantilevered balconies in the construction of a resort hotel; the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi (1954); and the Nuclear Research Center, near Islāmābād, Pak. (1966). The embassy in New Delhi, with its…

  • El Paraíso (archaeological site, Peru)

    El Paraíso, Late Preceramic site in the present-day Chillón Valley on the central Peruvian coast, generally believed to date just before the beginning of the Initial Period (c. 2100–1800 bc). It is notable for its large mud and rock apartment-like dwelling units. It is believed to be roughly c

  • El Paso (Texas, United States)

    El Paso, city, seat (1850) of El Paso county, extreme western Texas, U.S. It is located on the Rio Grande, there bridged to Juárez, Mexico, just south of the New Mexico line. The largest of the U.S.-Mexican border cities, it lies at the foot of the Franklin Mountains (at an elevation of 3,762 feet

  • El Paso del Norte (Mexico)

    Juárez, city, northern Chihuahua estado (state), northern Mexico. It is located on the Rio Grande (Río Bravo del Norte) opposite El Paso, Texas, U.S., with which it is connected by bridges. Formerly known as El Paso del Norte, it was renamed in 1888 for the Mexican president Benito Juárez, who

  • El Progreso (Honduras)

    El Progreso, city, northwestern Honduras, on the Ulúa River, southeast of San Pedro Sula. The city, founded in 1927 as a banana trade centre, grew in the 1970s into a commercial and transshipment centre for the Caribbean ports and the interior. Industries include cement products, metalware, shoes,

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
港台一级毛片免费观看