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  • ditch (waterway)

    land reclamation: Reclamation of swampy lands: …outlet is to dig a ditch from the swampy area to a river, sea, or other natural body of water. The size of the ditch is determined by the amount of water to be carried and the gradient of slope along the ditch. The topography of the land, the amount…

  • ditch moss (plant genus)

    Elodea, genus of five or six species of submerged aquatic plants in the frog’s-bit family (Hydrocharitaceae), useful in aquariums and in laboratory demonstrations of cellular activities. Elodea plants are native to the New World, though a number of species have established themselves as invasive

  • ditch stonecrop (plant)

    Penthorum: The ditch, or Virginian, stonecrop (Penthorum sedoides) grows to about 60 cm (2 feet) tall. It has pale greenish yellow flowers and pale green leaves that turn bright orange as they mature. Ditch stonecrop is planted as an ornamental at the edges of pools or in…

  • Ditch, Battle of the (Islamic history)

    Battle of the Ditch, an early Muslim victory that ultimately forced the Meccans to recognize the political and religious strength of the Muslim community in Medina. A Meccan army of 3,000 men had defeated the undisciplined Muslim forces at U?ud near Medina in 625, wounding Muhammad himself. In

  • ditcher (engineering)

    Trenching machine, excavation machine employing a wheel fitted with rim buckets, or with a boom or ladder on which an endless chain of buckets or scrapers revolves. The machine is self-propelled on rubber tires or crawlers (continuous metal treads driven by wheels). As the machine moves forward,

  • diterpene (chemical compound)

    isoprenoid: Diterpenes: Phytol, an oxygenated acyclic diterpene, is an important building block of the chlorophyll molecule, from which it is obtained on treatment with alkali solution. The arrangement of isoprene units in phytol is identical with that in vitamin A, a monocyclic diterpene derivative, and is…

  • Dith Pran (Cambodian photojournalist and interpreter)

    Dith Pran, Cambodian photojournalist and interpreter (born Sept. 27, 1942, Siemréab, Camb.—died March 30, 2008, New Brunswick, N.J.), was the real-life model for the central character in the film The Killing Fields (1984), based on the 1980 article “The Death and Life of Dith Pran” by New York

  • Ditherington (England, United Kingdom)

    Western architecture: Construction in iron and glass: …mill (now Allied Breweries) at Ditherington, Shropshire (1796–97), is one of the first iron-frame buildings, though brick walls still carry part of the load and there are no longitudinal beams. The cloth mill at King’s Stanley, Gloucestershire (1812–13), is more convincing as an iron-frame building. Fully fireproof and avoiding the…

  • dithiazanine (drug)

    anthelmintic: Nematode anthelmintics: Dithiazanine is another nematode anthelmintic used in veterinary medicine; it is effective against heartworms and threadworms. Levamisole is used in the treatment of lungworm infections in cattle. Phenothiazine, introduced in the 1930s, is still used against the wireworm (Haemonchus contortus) of sheep and cattle.

  • dithiothione (biochemistry)

    cancer: Chemoprevention: For example, dithiothiones are potential chemopreventive agents that naturally occur in broccoli and cauliflower. A number of anticancer drugs under study also show promise in preventing cancer. Those include antiestrogen drugs such as tamoxifen, which

  • Dithmar (German bishop)

    Thietmar, bishop of Merseburg and chronicler whose history of the three Ottos and Henry II, Saxon kings of Germany and Holy Roman emperors, is an important medieval Saxon document. The son of John Siegfried, Graf von Walbeck, and a relative of the royal house, Thietmar spent his youth in Magdeburg,

  • Dithmarschen (historical region, Germany)

    Dithmarschen, area on the west coast of the Jutland peninsula between the Eider and Elbe rivers, now included in the Land (state) of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, but down to 1866 a semi-independent territory under the king of Denmark. First mentioned in the 9th century, Dithmarschen was then one of

  • dithyramb (song)

    Dithyramb, choral song in honour of the wine god Dionysus. The form was known as early as the 7th century bc in Greece, where an improvised lyric was sung by banqueters under the leadership of a man who, according to the poet Archilochus, was “wit-stricken by the thunderbolt of wine.” It was

  • Ditié de Jehanne d’Arc, Le (work by Christine de Pisan)

    Christine de Pisan: Her last work, Le Ditié de Jehanne d’Arc (written in 1429), is a lyrical, joyous outburst inspired by the early victories of Joan of Arc; it is the only such French-language work written during Joan’s lifetime.

  • Ditka, Michael Keller (American football player and coach)

    Mike Ditka, American gridiron football player and head coach. In the 1960s and early ’70s he proved himself one of professional football’s greatest tight ends, using his talent for catching passes to revolutionize his position. After retiring as a player, Ditka embarked on a successful coaching

  • Ditka, Mike (American football player and coach)

    Mike Ditka, American gridiron football player and head coach. In the 1960s and early ’70s he proved himself one of professional football’s greatest tight ends, using his talent for catching passes to revolutionize his position. After retiring as a player, Ditka embarked on a successful coaching

  • Ditko, Steve (American artist)

    Doctor Strange: …writer Stan Lee and artist Steve Ditko. The character first appeared in a backup strip in Strange Tales no. 110 in July 1963 but soon blossomed into one of the cult characters of the decade and a staple in the Marvel pantheon.

  • Ditlevsen, Tove (Danish author)

    Danish literature: Postwar literary trends: Tove Ditlevsen was another important poet, as well as a novelist and short-story writer, unattached to any group; her often intensely personal work reflects the loneliness of life in the poorer quarters of Copenhagen.

  • Ditmarsken (historical region, Germany)

    Dithmarschen, area on the west coast of the Jutland peninsula between the Eider and Elbe rivers, now included in the Land (state) of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, but down to 1866 a semi-independent territory under the king of Denmark. First mentioned in the 9th century, Dithmarschen was then one of

  • ditta di borsa (sociology)

    public opinion: The Middle Ages to the early modern period: …in the banking community; the ditta di borsa (“opinion on the bourse”) is often referred to in documents of the period.

  • dittany (plant species)

    Gas plant, (Dictamnus albus), gland-covered herb of the rue family (Rutaceae). Gas plant is native to Eurasia and is grown as an ornamental in many places. The flowers (white or pink) and the leaves give off a strong aromatic vapour that can be ignited—hence the names gas plant and burning bush.

  • dittany (plant grouping)

    Dittany, any of several plants, including European dittany (gas plant; Dictamnus albus), American dittany (common dittany; Cunila origanoides), and dittany of Crete (Cretan dittany, or hop marjoram; Origanum dictamnus). European dittany is in the rue family (Rutaceae), while the other two species

  • dittany of Crete (plant)

    dittany: … (common dittany; Cunila origanoides), and dittany of Crete (Cretan dittany, or hop marjoram; Origanum dictamnus). European dittany is in the rue family (Rutaceae), while the other two species are in the mint family (Lamiaceae). All three species are bushy perennials cultivated for their aromatic foliage.

  • Ditte Menneskebarn (work by Nex?)

    Martin Andersen Nex?: (1917–21; Ditte: Daughter of Man), depicts the life of a poor, courageous, and loving girl and woman for whom there is no escape from oppression. A third novel, Midt i en J?rntid (1929; In God’s Land), is critical of wealthy farmers during the period of agricultural…

  • Ditte: Daughter of Man (work by Nex?)

    Martin Andersen Nex?: (1917–21; Ditte: Daughter of Man), depicts the life of a poor, courageous, and loving girl and woman for whom there is no escape from oppression. A third novel, Midt i en J?rntid (1929; In God’s Land), is critical of wealthy farmers during the period of agricultural…

  • Ditters von Dittersdorf, Carl (Austrian composer and violinist)

    Carl Ditters von Dittersdorf, violinist and composer of instrumental music and of light operas that established the form of the singspiel (a comic opera in the German language). A brilliant child violinist, Ditters played regularly at the age of 12 in the orchestra of Prince von

  • Ditters, Carl (Austrian composer and violinist)

    Carl Ditters von Dittersdorf, violinist and composer of instrumental music and of light operas that established the form of the singspiel (a comic opera in the German language). A brilliant child violinist, Ditters played regularly at the age of 12 in the orchestra of Prince von

  • Dittmar, Wilhelm (German chemist)

    Earth sciences: Foundations of oceanography: The German-born chemist Wilhelm Dittmar conducted quantitative determinations of the seven major constituents (other than the hydrogen and oxygen of the water itself)—namely, sodium, calcium, magnesium, potassium, chloride, bromide, and sulfate. Surprisingly, the percentages of these components turned out to be nearly the same in all samples.

  • dittography (writing)

    biblical literature: Types of manuscript errors: Dittography (the picking up of a word or group of words and repeating it) and haplography (the omission of syllables, words, or lines) are errors most apt to occur where there are similar words or syllables involved. In chapter 17, verse 15, of John, in…

  • Ditzen, Rudolf Wilhelm Friedrich (German author)

    Hans Fallada, German novelist who was one of the most prominent exponents of the realistic style known as Neue Sachlichkeit (New Objectivity). His depiction of social misfits, which was influenced by his personal experience, resonated with readers at the turn of the 21st century as much as it did

  • Diu (union territory, India)

    Daman and Diu, union territory of India, comprising two widely separated districts on the country’s western coast. Daman is an enclave on the state of Gujarat’s southern coast, situated 100 miles (160 km) north of Mumbai (Bombay). Diu encompasses an island off the southern coast of Gujarat’s

  • Diu (India)

    Diu, town, Daman and Diu union territory, western India. It is situated on an island in the Gulf of Khambhat (Cambay) of the Arabian Sea, off the southern tip of the Kathiawar Peninsula in southeastern Gujarat state. Diu Island is about 7 miles (11 km) long and 2 miles (3 km) wide. It is known for

  • Diula (people)

    Dyula, people of western Africa who speak a Mande language of the Niger-Congo language family. Most are Muslims, and they have long been noted as commercial traders. The Dyula were active gold traders as long ago as the time of the ancient African kingdom of Ghana. They flourished under the empire

  • diuresis (pathology)

    renal system: The concentration of urine: Diuresis is an increased flow of urine produced as the result of increased fluid intake, absence of hormonal activity, or the taking of certain drugs that reduce sodium and water reabsorption from the tubules. If ADH secretion is inhibited by the drinking of excess water,…

  • diuretic (pharmacology)

    Diuretic, any drug that increases the flow of urine. Diuretics promote the removal from the body of excess water, salts, poisons, and accumulated metabolic products, such as urea. They serve to rid the body of excess fluid (edema) that accumulates in the tissues owing to various disease states.

  • Diuris (plant)

    Donkey orchid, (genus Diuris), genus of about 60 species of terrestrial orchids (family Orchidaceae). One species is found in Java and Timor, and the others are native to Australia. The common donkey orchid (Diuris longifolia) bears three to five purplish flowers about 4 cm (1.5 inches) long. Other

  • Diuris filifolia (plant)

    donkey orchid: Other well-known species are cat’s face (D. filifolia) and nanny-goat orchid (D. laevis).

  • Diuris laevis (plant)

    donkey orchid: filifolia) and nanny-goat orchid (D. laevis).

  • Diuris longifolia (plant)

    donkey orchid: The common donkey orchid (Diuris longifolia) bears three to five purplish flowers about 4 cm (1.5 inches) long. Other well-known species are cat’s face (D. filifolia) and nanny-goat orchid (D. laevis).

  • diurnal enuresis (pathology)

    enuresis: … (occurring only during sleep), or diurnal (occurring during waking hours). The most prevalent form is nocturnal enuresis (also called bed-wetting and usually of the primary type), and the disorder occurs more often among boys than girls. Roughly 1 percent of children continue to be affected by this disorder until the…

  • diurnal motion (astronomy)

    Diurnal motion, apparent daily motion of the heavens from east to west in which celestial objects seem to rise and set, a phenomenon that results from the Earth’s rotation from west to east. The axis of this apparent motion coincides with the Earth’s axis of rotation. The intersection of the plane

  • diurnal rhythm (biology)

    Circadian rhythm, the cyclical 24-hour period of human biological activity. Within the circadian (24-hour) cycle, a person usually sleeps approximately 8 hours and is awake 16. During the wakeful hours, mental and physical functions are most active and tissue cell growth increases. During sleep,

  • diurnal temperature range

    climate: Diurnal, seasonal, and extreme temperatures: The diurnal range of temperature generally increases with distance from the sea and toward those places where solar radiation is strongest—in dry tropical climates and on high mountain plateaus (owing to the reduced thickness of the atmosphere to be traversed…

  • diurnal tide

    Earth tide: …measurable; these are the lunar diurnal, the lunar semidiurnal, the solar diurnal, and the solar semidiurnal tides. Diurnal tides have a period of approximately 24 hours (1 day), and semidiurnal tides have a period of approximately 12 hours (12 day). The actual amplitudes of these tides in terms of vertical…

  • diurnal variability (meteorology)

    climate: Diurnal variability: Landmasses in regions affected by monsoons warm up very rapidly in the afternoon hours, especially on days with cloud-free conditions; surface air temperatures between 35 and 40 °C (95 and 104 °F) are not uncommon. Under such conditions, warm air is slowly and…

  • diurnal vertical migration (biology)

    marine ecosystem: Migrations of marine organisms: Diurnal vertical migrations are common. For example, some types of plankton, fish, and squid remain beneath the photic zone during the day, moving toward the surface after dusk and returning to the depths before dawn. It is generally argued that marine organisms migrate in response…

  • Dius Fidius (Roman deity)

    Jupiter: The lesser deities Dius Fidius and Fides were, perhaps, originally identical and certainly were connected with him. This connection with the conscience, with the sense of obligation and right dealing, was never quite lost throughout Roman history. In Virgil’s Aeneid, though Jupiter is in many ways as much…

  • Diushambe (national capital, Tajikistan)

    Dushanbe, city and capital of Tajikistan. It lies along the Varzob (Dushanbinka) River in the Gissar valley, in the southwest of the republic. It was built in the Soviet period on the site of three former settlements, of which the largest was named Dyushambe (Tajik dush, meaning “Monday,” its

  • div

    principles of physical science: Divergence and Laplace’s equation: When charges are not isolated points but form a continuous distribution with a local charge density ρ being the ratio of the charge δq in a small cell to the volume δv of the cell, then the flux of E over…

  • Divagations (work by Mallarmé)

    Symbolism: Symbolist literature: …of the Symbolists, and his Divagations (1897) remains the most valuable statement of the movement’s aesthetics. In their efforts to escape rigid metrical patterns and to achieve freer poetic rhythms, many Symbolist poets resorted to the composition of prose poems and the use of vers libre (free verse), which has…

  • Divah Kanbar (islands, India)

    Lakshadweep: >Laccadive, Minicoy, and Amindivi Islands, union territory of India. It is a group of some three dozen islands scattered over some 30,000 square miles (78,000 square km) of the Arabian Sea off the southwestern coast of India. The principal islands in the territory are Minicoy…

  • Divākara (Cambodian adviser)

    Divākarapa??ita, Hindu of the Brahman (priestly) caste who rose through religious and administrative ranks to serve four Cambodian kings—Harshavarman II, Jayavarman VI, Dharanindravarman I, and the great Suryavarman II—and who was the most trusted adviser to three of them. The highly opportunistic

  • Divākarapa??ita (Cambodian adviser)

    Divākarapa??ita, Hindu of the Brahman (priestly) caste who rose through religious and administrative ranks to serve four Cambodian kings—Harshavarman II, Jayavarman VI, Dharanindravarman I, and the great Suryavarman II—and who was the most trusted adviser to three of them. The highly opportunistic

  • divalence (chemistry)

    crystal: Conductivity of metals: Divalent atoms, such as magnesium or calcium, donate both valence electrons to become conduction electrons, while monovalent atoms, such as lithium or gold, donate one. As will be recalled, the number of conduction electrons alone does not determine conductivity; it depends on electron mobility as…

  • Divali (Hindu festival)

    Diwali, one of the major religious festivals in Hinduism, lasting for five days from the 13th day of the dark half of the lunar month Ashvina to the second day of the light half of Karttika. (The corresponding dates in the Gregorian calendar usually fall in late October and November.) The name is

  • divan (Islamic government unit)

    Divan, in Islāmic societies, a “register,” or logbook, and later a “finance department,” “government bureau,” or “administration.” The first divan appeared under the caliph ?Umar I (634–644) as a pensions list, recording free Arab warriors entitled to a share of the spoils of war. Out of rents and

  • Dīvān (poetry by ?āfe?)

    Islamic arts: Lyric poetry: Mo?ammad Shams al-Dīn ?āfe?: …comparatively small collection of work—his Dīvān contains about 400 ghazals—was soon acclaimed as the finest lyrical poetry ever written in Persian. The discussion of whether or not to interpret its wine and love songs on a mystical plane has continued for centuries. Yet this discussion seems sterile since ?āfe?, whose…

  • Divan del Tamarit (work by García Lorca)

    Federico García Lorca: Later poetry and plays: Divan del Tamarit also expresses Lorca’s lifelong interest in Arab-Andalusian (frequently referred to as “Moorish”) culture, which he viewed as central to his identity as an Andalusian poet. He regarded the Catholic reconquest of Granada in 1492 as a tragic loss. Divan del Tamarit responds…

  • Dīvān-e Khā?? (building, Fatehpur Sikri, India)

    Akbar period architecture: …Hall of Private Audience (Diwan-i-Khas) is arresting in its interior arrangement, which has a single massive column encircled by brackets supporting a stone throne platform, from which radiate four railed balconies. The palace of Jodha Bai, Akbar’s wife, and the residence of Mahesh Das (commonly known as Bīrbal, Akbar’s…

  • Dīvān-e Shams (poetry by Rūmī)

    Rūmī: The influence of Shams al-Dīn: The Dīvān-e Shams (“The Collected Poetry of Shams”) is a true translation of his experiences into poetry; its language, however, never becomes lost in lofty spiritual heights or nebulous speculation. The fresh language, propelled by its strong rhythms, sometimes assumes forms close to popular verses. There…

  • Divan-i hikmet (work by Yesevi)

    Ahmed Yesevi: …to the poet is the Divan-i hikmet (“Book of Wisdom”), containing poems on mystical themes. Scholars believe that the work is probably not his. It is felt, however, that the poems in the Divan are similar in style and sentiment to what he wrote. The importance of Ahmed Yesevi cannot…

  • divani script

    Dīwānī script, cursive style of Arabic calligraphy developed during the reign of the early Ottoman Turks (16th–early 17th century). It was invented by Housam Roumi and reached its height of popularity under Süleyman I the Magnificent (1520–66). As decorative as it was communicative, dīwānī was

  • divariant system (chemistry and physics)

    phase: Unary systems: …is stable) the system is divariant—i.e., two degrees of freedom exist. Thus, the two variables (pressure and temperature) can be changed independently, and the same phase assemblage continues to exist.

  • dive (sport)

    Diving, sport of plunging into water, usually head foremost, performed with the addition of gymnastic and acrobatic stunts. In its more elaborate, acrobatic form, diving originated in Europe early in the 19th century as a diversion of gymnasts and as a competitive sport in the late 19th century. It

  • dive bomber (military aircraft)

    Dive bomber, in early military aircraft, a plane that was designed to dive directly at a target, release bombs at low altitude, level off abruptly, and depart. The tactic dated from an experimental Allied sortie in World War I. It was the subject of considerable exploration in the 1920s by U.S.

  • Divehi Raajjeyge Jumhooriyyaa

    Maldives, independent island country in the north-central Indian Ocean. It consists of a chain of about 1,200 small coral islands and sandbanks (some 200 of which are inhabited), grouped in clusters, or atolls. The islands extend more than 510 miles (820 km) from north to south and 80 miles (130

  • diver (bird)

    Loon, (order Gaviiformes), any of five species of diving birds constituting the genus Gavia, family Gaviidae. Loons were formerly included, along with the grebes, to which they bear a superficial resemblance, in the order Colymbiformes, but they are considered to constitute their own separate

  • Diver (painting by Johns)

    Jasper Johns: …textures in such works as Diver (1962). Changing his style in the 1970s, he produced near-monochrome paintings composed of clusters of parallel lines that he called “crosshatchings.” The paintings he did in the 1980s contain both figural elements and autobiographical references.

  • Diver, Dick and Nicole (fictional characters)

    Dick and Nicole Diver, fictional characters, an ill-fated American couple in Europe in the novel Tender Is the Night (1934; rev. ed. 1948) by American writer F. Scott

  • divergence (evolution)

    heredity: DNA phylogeny: …of mutations, a process called divergence. The greater the amount of divergence, the longer must have been the time since the split occurred. To carry out this sort of analysis, the DNA sequence data are fed into a computer. The computer positions similar species together on short adjacent branches showing…

  • divergence (mathematics)

    Divergence, In mathematics, a differential operator applied to a three-dimensional vector-valued function. The result is a function that describes a rate of change. The divergence of a vector v is given by in which v1, v2, and v3 are the vector components of v, typically a velocity field of fluid

  • divergence (atmospheric)

    convergence and divergence: divergence, in meteorology, the accumulation or drawing apart of air, as well as the rate at which each takes place. The terms are usually used to refer specifically to the horizontal inflow (convergence) or outflow (divergence) of air. The convergence of horizontal winds causes air…

  • divergence of a vector field

    principles of physical science: Divergence and Laplace’s equation: When charges are not isolated points but form a continuous distribution with a local charge density ρ being the ratio of the charge δq in a small cell to the volume δv of the cell, then the flux of E over…

  • divergence theorem (mathematics)

    mechanics of solids: Equations of motion: …for Tj above and the divergence theorem of multivariable calculus, which states that integrals over the area of a closed surface S, with integrand ni f (x), may be rewritten as integrals over the volume V enclosed by S, with integrand ?f (x)/?xi; when f (x) is a differentiable function,…

  • Divergent (film by Burger [2014])

    Kate Winslet: …as a ruthless operative in Divergent (2014), based on a series of young-adult novels, and wafted through the period piece A Little Chaos (2014), a fictional take on the romantic life of Versailles garden designer André Le N?tre.

  • Divergent (novel by Roth)

    Veronica Roth: …studied creative writing, Roth penned Divergent, the first installment in the trilogy, over winter break during her senior year.

  • divergent evolution (evolution)

    heredity: DNA phylogeny: …of mutations, a process called divergence. The greater the amount of divergence, the longer must have been the time since the split occurred. To carry out this sort of analysis, the DNA sequence data are fed into a computer. The computer positions similar species together on short adjacent branches showing…

  • divergent plate boundary (geology)

    earthquake: Tectonic associations: …oceanic ridges, which correspond to divergent plate boundaries. At the subduction zones, which are associated with convergent plate boundaries, intermediate- and deep-focus earthquakes mark the location of the upper part of a dipping lithosphere slab. The focal mechanisms indicate that the stresses are aligned with the dip of the lithosphere…

  • Divergent Series: Allegiant, The (film by Schwentke [2016])

    Naomi Watts: …2016 included the dystopian fantasy The Divergent Series: Allegiant, in which she played a rebel leader, and Shut In, a supernatural thriller about a child psychologist who thinks she is being haunted by the ghost of a former patient. In 2017 she appeared in the thriller The Book of Henry…

  • divergent thinking (psychology)

    thought: Creative thinking: As discussed above, divergent (or creative) thinking is an activity that leads to new information, or previously undiscovered solutions. Some problems demand flexibility, originality, fluency, and inventiveness, especially those for which the individual must supply a unique solution. (See creativity.)

  • diverging lens (optics)

    lens: Optical principles for lenses: … on, or to appear to diverge from, a single point. This point is called the focal point, or principal focus, of the lens (often depicted in ray diagrams as F). Refraction of the rays of light reflected from or emitted by an object causes the rays to form a visual…

  • Divers Voyages Touching the Discouerie of America (work by Hakluyt)

    Richard Hakluyt: …in his first important work, Divers Voyages Touching the Discouerie of America (1582). In this he also pleaded for the establishment of a lectureship in navigation.

  • divers’ itch (pathology)

    decompression sickness: …an itching sensation known as divers’ itches. Usually these symptoms pass in 10 to 20 minutes. Excessive coughing and difficulty in breathing, known as the chokes, indicate nitrogen bubbles in the respiratory system. Other symptoms include chest pain, a burning sensation while breathing, and severe shock.

  • divers’ palsy (pathology)

    decompression sickness: …cause paralysis and convulsions (divers’ palsy), difficulties with muscle coordination and sensory abnormalities (divers’ staggers), numbness, nausea, speech defects, and personality changes. When bubbles accumulate in the joints, pain is usually severe and mobility is restricted. The term bends is derived from this affliction, as the affected person commonly…

  • divers’ stagger (pathology)

    decompression sickness: …coordination and sensory abnormalities (divers’ staggers), numbness, nausea, speech defects, and personality changes. When bubbles accumulate in the joints, pain is usually severe and mobility is restricted. The term bends is derived from this affliction, as the affected person commonly is unable to straighten joints.

  • diversification (economics)

    automotive industry: Diversity of products: The automotive industry’s immense resources in production facilities and technical and managerial skills have been devoted predominantly to the building of motor vehicles, but there has been a consistent and strong incentive to extend into related products and occasionally into operations whose…

  • diversification (ecology)

    Biodiversity, the variety of life found in a place on Earth or, often, the total variety of life on Earth. A common measure of this variety, called species richness, is the count of species in an area. Colombia and Kenya, for example, each have more than 1,000 breeding species of birds, whereas the

  • diversifying selection (biology)

    evolution: Diversifying selection: Two or more divergent phenotypes in an environment may be favoured simultaneously by diversifying selection. (See the right column of the figure.) No natural environment is homogeneous; rather, the environment of any plant or animal population is a mosaic consisting of more or…

  • diversion (criminal justice system)

    Diversion, any of a variety of programs that implement strategies seeking to avoid the formal processing of an offender by the criminal justice system. Although those strategies, referred to collectively as diversion, take many forms, a typical diversion program results in a person who has been

  • Diversions of the Morning (work by Foote)

    Samuel Foote: …series of farcical entertainments called Diversions of the Morning, in which he ridiculed other actors and celebrities. Later, to avoid the restraints of the Licensing Act, which required patents for public performances, he styled his entertainments for his friends as “teas.”

  • Diversisporales (order of fungi)

    fungus: Annotated classification: Order Diversisporales Arbuscular mycorrhizal; forms complexes of spores; example genera include Acaulospora, Diversispora, and Pacispora. Order Gigasporales Arbuscular mycorrhizal; uses extra-radical auxiliary cells instead of vesicles in plant roots. Order Glomerales

  • Diversity of Life, The (work by Wilson)

    Edward O. Wilson: In The Diversity of Life (1992), Wilson sought to explain how the world’s living species became diverse and examined the massive species extinctions caused by human activities in the 20th century.

  • diversity, species (ecology)

    Biodiversity, the variety of life found in a place on Earth or, often, the total variety of life on Earth. A common measure of this variety, called species richness, is the count of species in an area. Colombia and Kenya, for example, each have more than 1,000 breeding species of birds, whereas the

  • diverticula (pathology)

    Diverticulum, any small pouch or sac that forms in the wall of a major organ of the human body. Diverticula form most commonly in the esophagus, small intestine, and large intestine and are most often a problem in the latter organ. Middle-aged and older people are particularly susceptible to the

  • diverticula (zoology)

    bivalve: The digestive system and nutrition: …and intracellular in the digestive diverticula, opening laterally from the stomach wall. Transport of food particles is effected by cilia, creating an array of tracts and sorting areas within the stomach. The principal organ of extracellular digestion is the crystalline style. It is rotated in its sac by cilia; the…

  • diverticulitis (pathology)

    diverticulum: …a more serious condition called diverticulitis. Its symptoms are pain and tenderness in the lower left side of the abdomen, chills, and sometimes fever. The presence of diverticulitis can be determined by X rays or computed tomography (CT) scans. The treatment for a mild or moderate case of diverticulitis consists…

  • diverticulosis (pathology)

    nutritional disease: Bowel conditions and diseases: …defecation can also contribute to diverticulosis, small outpouchings in the colonic wall, which may become inflamed (diverticulitis) and present serious complications. Another possible consequence of straining is hemorrhoids, swollen veins of the rectum and anus that typically lead to pain, itching, and

  • diverticulum (pathology)

    Diverticulum, any small pouch or sac that forms in the wall of a major organ of the human body. Diverticula form most commonly in the esophagus, small intestine, and large intestine and are most often a problem in the latter organ. Middle-aged and older people are particularly susceptible to the

  • divertimenti (music)

    Divertimento, (Italian: “diversion,” or “amusement”, ) 18th-century musical genre of a light and entertaining nature usually consisting of several movements for strings, winds, or both. The movements included sonata forms, variation forms, dances, and rondos. One of Joseph Haydn’s numerous

  • divertimento (music)

    Divertimento, (Italian: “diversion,” or “amusement”, ) 18th-century musical genre of a light and entertaining nature usually consisting of several movements for strings, winds, or both. The movements included sonata forms, variation forms, dances, and rondos. One of Joseph Haydn’s numerous

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