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  • Dingiswayo (Mthethwa leader)

    Dingiswayo, African chief or king of the Mthethwa of Southern Africa. Few hard facts are known about Dingiswayo—not even the approximate dates of his birth, his assumption of chieftaincy, or his death—but it is clear that he was dominant during the first two decades of the 19th century (though he

  • Dingle Bay (bay, Ireland)

    Dingle Peninsula: Dingle Bay separates the Dingle Peninsula from the Iveragh Peninsula to the south.

  • Dingle Peninsula (peninsula, Ireland)

    Dingle Peninsula, peninsula and bay in County Kerry, on the southwestern coast of Ireland. The peninsula begins south of Tralee as the Slieve Mish range, with elevations of more than 2,000 feet (600 metres), but in the west it becomes a mixture of hills and lowlands, with a north-trending line of

  • Dingley Tariff Act (United States [1897])

    William McKinley: Presidency: …he signed into law the Dingley Tariff, the highest protective tariff in American history to that time. Yet domestic issues would play only a minor role in the McKinley presidency. Emerging from decades of isolationism in the 1890s, Americans had already shown signs of wanting to play a more assertive…

  • Dingley, Peter Waters (British radio personality)

    radio: Pirates and public-service radio: Johnny Walker, for example, became popular on Radio Caroline and later shifted to BBC’s Radio 1; in the mid-1970s, he even worked on American radio. Doing it the other way around, John Peel began in American radio in the 1960s, later joining pirate Radio London…

  • Dinglinger, Johann Melchior (German metalworker)

    metalwork: 18th century: …II the Strong established under Johann Melchior Dinglinger a court workshop that produced jewels and enamelled goldwork unequalled since the Renaissance; and the gold snuffboxes made by Johann Christian Neuber rivalled those of the Parisian goldsmiths.

  • dingo (mammal)

    Dingo, (Canis lupus dingo, Canis dingo), member of the family Canidae native to Australia. Most authorities regard dingoes as a subspecies of the wolf (Canis lupus dingo); however, some authorities consider dingoes to be their own species (C. dingo). The name dingo is also used to describe wild

  • Dinguiraye (Guinea)

    Dinguiraye, town, north-central Guinea. It lies at the eastern edge of the Fouta Djallon plateau. The town was once the seat of the imamate (region ruled by a Muslim religious leader) of ?Umar Tal, whose jihad (holy war) led to the creation of the Tukulor empire (1850–93) in the Niger River valley.

  • Dinh Bo Linh (emperor of Vietnam)

    Dinh Bo Linh, emperor and founder of the second Vietnamese dynasty, who, after a decade of anarchy, reunified his country, winning official recognition of Vietnam as a state independent from China. According to Vietnamese annals, Dinh Bo Linh, of peasant ancestry, was the adopted son of a feudal

  • Dinh Tien Hoang (emperor of Vietnam)

    Dinh Bo Linh, emperor and founder of the second Vietnamese dynasty, who, after a decade of anarchy, reunified his country, winning official recognition of Vietnam as a state independent from China. According to Vietnamese annals, Dinh Bo Linh, of peasant ancestry, was the adopted son of a feudal

  • Dini, Lamberto (prime minister of Italy)

    Italy: Shifting power: …head the government, this time Lamberto Dini, the former chief executive of the Bank of Italy and previously Berlusconi’s treasury minister. In January 1995 Dini formed a government of nonpolitical “technocrats,” supported by the Northern League and by the left-wing parties in parliament (the losers in the 1994 elections). This…

  • Dinichthys (fossil placoderm genus)

    Dinichthys, extinct genus of arthrodires, i.e., primitive, armoured, fishlike animals known as placoderms that dominated ancient seas. Dinichthys lived during the Late Devonian Period (374 to 360 million years ago) and is found fossilized in rocks of that age in Europe, northern Asia, and North

  • Dinictis (extinct mammal)

    sabre-toothed cat: >Dinictis, and Barbourofelis. The Machairodontinae, extant from about 12 million to less than 10,000 years ago, include the more familiar Smilodon as well as Homotherium and Meganteron. Sabre-toothed cats roamed North America and Europe throughout the Miocene and Pliocene epochs (23 million to 2.6 million…

  • Dinigat bushy-tailed cloud rat (rodent)

    cloud rat: Bushy-tailed cloud rats: The Dinigat bushy-tailed cloud rat (C. australis) is about the same size as C. heaneyi and is found only on Dinagat Island, north of Mindanao. It has tawny fur on the head and back and an orange-brown belly.

  • dining car (railroad vehicle)

    railroad: Cars for daytime service: …terms of staff, dining or restaurant car service of main meals entirely prepared and cooked in an on-train kitchen has been greatly reduced since World War II. Full meal service is widely available on intercity trains, but many railroads have switched to airline methods of wholly or partly preparing dishes…

  • dining table

    table: …common type of large medieval dining table was of trestle construction, consisting of massive boards of oak or elm resting on a series of central supports to which they were affixed by pegs, which could be removed and the table dismantled. Tables with attached legs, joined by heavy stretchers fixed…

  • Dining with the Dictator (novel by Laferrière)

    Dany Laferrière: …Go?t des jeunes filles (1992; Dining with the Dictator), which together earned widespread praise for the lyrical quality of his narrative voice and for his thematic exploration of racial and sexual tension, exclusion and alienation, class consciousness, and the multiplicity of exploitation.

  • Dinis (king of Portugal)

    Dinis, sixth king of Portugal (1279–1325), who strengthened the kingdom by improving the economy and reducing the power of the nobility and the church. The son of Afonso III, Dinis was educated at a court subject to both French and Castilian cultural influences and became a competent poet. He

  • Dinis, Júlio (Portuguese author)

    Júlio Dinis, poet, playwright, and novelist, the first great novelist of modern Portuguese middle-class society. His novels, extremely popular in his lifetime and still widely read in Portugal today, are written in a simple and direct style accessible to a large public. His first attacks of

  • dinitrate (chemical compound)

    nitrocellulose: Composition, properties, and manufacture of nitrocellulose: …however, most nitrocellulose compounds are dinitrates, averaging 1.8 to 2.8 nitro groups per molecule and containing from 10.5 to 13.5 percent nitrogen. The degree of nitration determines the solubility and flammability of the final product.

  • dinitrogen monoxide (chemical compound)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), one of several oxides of nitrogen, a colourless gas with pleasant, sweetish odour and taste, which when inhaled produces insensibility to pain preceded by mild hysteria, sometimes laughter. (Because inhalation of small amounts provides a brief euphoric effect and nitrous oxide

  • dinitrogen pentoxide (chemical compound)

    oxide: Nonmetal oxides: …as sulfur trioxide (SO3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5), in which the nonmetal exhibits one of its common oxidation numbers, are known as acid anhydrides. These oxides react with water to form oxyacids, with no change in the oxidation number of the nonmetal; for example, N2O5 + H2O → 2HNO3. Second,…

  • dinitrogen tetroxide (chemical compound)

    ammonia: Hydrazine: and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine, (H3C)2NNH2, with liquid dinitrogen tetroxide, N2O4. Three tons of the methyl hydrazine mixture were required for the landing on the Moon, and about one ton was required for the launch from the lunar surface. The major commercial uses of hydrazine are as a blowing agent (to make holes…

  • dinitrogen trioxide (chemical compound)

    oxide: Oxides of nitrogen: …(?6 °F), the gases form dinitrogen trioxide, a blue liquid consisting of N2O3 molecules. This molecule exists only in the liquid and solid states. When heated, it forms a mixture of NO and NO2. Nitrogen dioxide is prepared commercially by oxidizing NO with air, but it can be prepared in…

  • Dinitz, Simon (American criminologist)

    Walter Reckless: …collaboration with the American criminologist Simon Dinitz (1926–2007), on the behavioral patterns of nondelinquent boys who lived in high-delinquency neighbourhoods. Reckless concluded that a good self-concept acted as an insulator against the social and personal forces that drove some boys toward delinquency (see human behaviour: Self-concept, or identity). In the…

  • Diniz (king of Portugal)

    Dinis, sixth king of Portugal (1279–1325), who strengthened the kingdom by improving the economy and reducing the power of the nobility and the church. The son of Afonso III, Dinis was educated at a court subject to both French and Castilian cultural influences and became a competent poet. He

  • Dink, Hrant (Turkish journalist)

    Hrant Dink, Turkish journalist (born Sept. 15, 1954 , Matalya, Turkey—died Jan. 19, 2007 , Istanbul, Turkey), campaigned for the rights of ethnic Armenians, both as a prominent spokesman for his ethnic community in Turkey and as the founder (1996) and editor of the bilingual Turkish-Armenian

  • Dinka (people)

    Dinka, people who live in the savanna country surrounding the central swamps of the Nile basin primarily in South Sudan. They speak a Nilotic language classified within the Eastern Sudanic branch of the Nilo-Saharan languages and are closely related to the Nuer. Numbering some 4,500,000 in the

  • Dinka language

    Nilo-Saharan languages: The diffusion of Nilo-Saharan languages: …Nubian, and the Nilotic languages Dinka (South Sudan), Kalenjin (Kenya), Luo (mainly in Kenya and Tanzania), and Teso (Uganda and Kenya). Of these, only Kanuri is a lingua franca in the proper sense.

  • Dinkard (Zoroastrian work)

    Dēnkart, (Pahlavi: “Acts of the Religion”) 9th-century encyclopaedia of the Zoroastrian religious tradition. Of the original nine volumes, part of the third and all of volumes four through nine are extant. The surviving portion of the third book is a major source of Zoroastrian theology. It

  • Dinkeloo, John (architect)

    Kevin Roche: …Roche and his future partner, John Dinkeloo (1918–81), completed Saarinen’s incomplete projects, including the Dulles International Airport terminal building near Washington, D.C. (1962), the Vivian Beaumont Repertory Theater for the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in Manhattan (opened 1965), and the stainless steel Gateway Arch of the Jefferson National…

  • Dinkelsbühl (Germany)

    Dinkelsbühl, city, Bavaria Land (state), southern Germany. It lies along the W?rnitz River about 20 miles (30 km) southwest of Ansbach. Mentioned in 928, it was fortified in the 10th century and became a free imperial city in 1273. It flourished in the 14th and 15th centuries and successfully

  • Dinkins, David (American politician)

    David Dinkins, American politician, who served as the first African American mayor of New York City (1990–93). After graduating from high school in 1945, Dinkins attempted to enlist in the U.S. Marine Corps but was told that the “Negro quota” had already been met. He eventually was drafted and

  • Dinkins, David Norman (American politician)

    David Dinkins, American politician, who served as the first African American mayor of New York City (1990–93). After graduating from high school in 1945, Dinkins attempted to enlist in the U.S. Marine Corps but was told that the “Negro quota” had already been met. He eventually was drafted and

  • Dinklage, Peter (American actor)

    Peter Dinklage, American actor who was perhaps best known for his role as Tyrion Lannister, a humane and clever dwarf with a penchant for debauchery, on the HBO television show Game of Thrones (2011–19). Dinklage was born with achondroplasia, a form of dwarfism caused by an abnormality in the

  • Dinner at Eight (film by Cukor [1933])

    Dinner at Eight, American comedy film, released in 1933, that was directed by George Cukor and featured an all-star cast. The witty and fast-paced film was based on the play by George S. Kaufman and Edna Ferber. A dizzy socialite (played by Billie Burke) is so determined to keep her social status

  • Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant (novel by Tyler)

    Anne Tyler: …readers, and her next novel, Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant (1982), was a national best seller. Her highly successful novel The Accidental Tourist (1985) examines the life of a recently divorced man who writes travel guides for businessmen. It was made into a film in 1988. Tyler’s later works included…

  • Dinner for Schmucks (film by Roach [2010])

    Steve Carell: …misfit in the screwball comedy Dinner for Schmucks. That year he also provided the voice of Gru, a super-villain who plots to steal the Moon, in the animated Despicable Me; he reprised the role in two sequels (2013 and 2017) and voiced a young Gru in Minions (2015).

  • Dinner Island (island, Papua New Guinea)

    Samarai: Samarai Island, Papua New Guinea, southwestern Pacific Ocean. It lies 3 miles (5 km) offshore from the southeasternmost extremity of the island of New Guinea.

  • Dinner Party, The (work by Chicago)

    Judy Chicago: …but it was an installation, The Dinner Party (1974–79), that made her reputation. It became an instant touchstone for the growing feminist movement in the United States.

  • Dinner Table, The (painting by Matisse)

    Henri Matisse: Formative years: …scandal at the Salon with The Dinner Table, in which he combined a Pierre-Auguste Renoir kind of luminosity with a firmly classical composition in deep red and green.

  • Dinnsheanchas (collection of legends)

    Dindshenchas, (Gaelic: “Lore of Places”), studies in Gaelic prose and verse of the etymology and history of place-names in Ireland—e.g., of streams, raths (strongholds of ancient Irish chiefs), mounds, and rocks. These studies were preserved in variant forms in monastic manuscripts dating from as

  • Dinocardium robustum (clam)

    cockle: 5 centimetres; and the great heart cockle (Dinocardium robustum), 15 centimetres.

  • Dinocephalosaurus (fossil reptile genus)

    archosaur: …such a live-bearing form is Dinocephalosaurus, an archosauromorph—that is, a form more closely related to archosaurs than lepidosaurs (the lineage containing modern lizards and snakes, their direct ancestors, and their close relatives)—which lived about 245 million years ago.

  • Dinocrates (Greek architect)

    Dinocrates, Greek architect who prospered under Alexander the Great. He tried to captivate the ambitious fancy of that king with a design for carving Mount Athos into a gigantic seated statue. The plan was not carried out, but Dinocrates designed for Alexander the plan of the new city of

  • Dinoflagellata (organism)

    Dinoflagellate, (division Dinoflagellata), any of numerous one-celled aquatic organisms bearing two dissimilar flagella and having characteristics of both plants and animals. Most are marine, though some live in freshwater habitats. The group is an important component of phytoplankton in all but

  • dinoflagellate (organism)

    Dinoflagellate, (division Dinoflagellata), any of numerous one-celled aquatic organisms bearing two dissimilar flagella and having characteristics of both plants and animals. Most are marine, though some live in freshwater habitats. The group is an important component of phytoplankton in all but

  • Dinoflagellida (organism)

    Dinoflagellate, (division Dinoflagellata), any of numerous one-celled aquatic organisms bearing two dissimilar flagella and having characteristics of both plants and animals. Most are marine, though some live in freshwater habitats. The group is an important component of phytoplankton in all but

  • Dinohyus (fossil mammal genus)

    Dinohyus, extinct genus of giant piglike mammals found as fossils in deposits of early Miocene age in North America (the Miocene Epoch occurred 23.7 to 5.3 million years ago). Dinohyus is the last and largest of a group of mammals called entelodonts, an early offshoot of the primitive swine stock.

  • Dinolestes lewini (fish)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Dinolestidae 1 species (Dinolestes lewini), resembling, but not related to, the barracudas (Sphyraenidae). Marine; Australia and Tasmania; length to 80 cm (31 inches). Family Percichthyidae (perch trouts) Eocene to present. Dull-coloured, small perchlike freshwater and marine fishes of Australia, Chile, and Argentina. Dorsal fin deeply notched. About 11…

  • Dinomys branickii (rodent)

    Pacarana, (Dinomys branickii), a rare and slow-moving South American rodent found only in tropical forests of the western Amazon River basin and adjacent foothills of the Andes Mountains from northwestern Venezuela and Colombia to western Bolivia. It has a chunky body and is large for a rodent,

  • Dinopercidae (fish family)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Family Dinopercidae Dorsal fin continuous; caudal fin truncate; 3 pairs of intrinsic swim-bladder muscles. 2 monotypic genera. Marine, Indian and Atlantic oceans. Families Glaucosomatidae and Lobotidae Deep-bodied perchlike fishes found in eastern Pacific Ocean, except Lobotes, which also occurs elsewhere in tropical salt water and fresh…

  • Dinophilida (polychaete order)

    annelid: Annotated classification: …separate orders by some (Nerillida, Dinophilida, Polygordiida, Protodrilida); genera include Dinophilus and Polygordius. Order Myzostomida Body disk-shaped or oval without external segmentation; external or internal commensals or parasites of echinoderms, especially crinoids;

  • Dinophilus (polychaete genus)

    annelid: Annotated classification: >Dinophilus and Polygordius. Order Myzostomida Body disk-shaped or oval without external segmentation; external or internal commensals or parasites of echinoderms, especially crinoids; size, minute to 1 cm; genera include Myzostoma. Order

  • Dinophyceae (algae class)

    algae: Annotated classification: …described, most in the class Dinophyceae; includes Alexandrium, Ceratium, Dinophysis, Gonyaulax, Gymnodinium, Noctiluca, Peridinium, and Polykrikos.

  • Dinophysis (dinoflagellate genus)

    algae: Annotated classification: >Dinophysis, Gonyaulax, Gymnodinium, Noctiluca, Peridinium, and Polykrikos. Division Euglenophyta Taxonomy is contentious. Primarily unicellular

  • Dinopidae (arachnid)

    Ogre-faced spider, any member of the family Dinopidae (or Deinopidae; order Araneida). One pair of eyes is unusually large, producing an ogrelike appearance. The spiders occur throughout the tropics. One genus, Dinopis, the net-casting spider, carries a web that is thrown over

  • Dinopis (arachnid)

    ogre-faced spider: One genus, Dinopis, the net-casting spider, carries a web that is thrown over prey.

  • Dinornis (extinct bird)

    Moa, (order Dinornithiformes), any of several extinct ostrichlike flightless birds native to New Zealand and constituting the order Dinornithiformes. The number of different species is in dispute, estimates varying from 9 to 64. Among these species, individuals ranged in size from that of a turkey

  • Dinornithidae (extinct bird)

    moa: …greater moas, in the family Dinornithidae, included the giants of the order. The fossil record for moas is poor; the earliest remains are regarded as originating in the Late Miocene Epoch (11.6 million to 5.3 million years ago).

  • Dinornithiformes (extinct bird)

    Moa, (order Dinornithiformes), any of several extinct ostrichlike flightless birds native to New Zealand and constituting the order Dinornithiformes. The number of different species is in dispute, estimates varying from 9 to 64. Among these species, individuals ranged in size from that of a turkey

  • dinosaur (fossil reptile)

    Dinosaur, the common name given to a group of reptiles, often very large, that first appeared roughly 245 million years ago (near the beginning of the Middle Triassic Epoch) and thrived worldwide for nearly 180 million years. Most died out by the end of the Cretaceous Period, about 66 million years

  • Dinosaur National Monument (monument, Colorado-Utah, United States)

    Dinosaur National Monument, desert area in northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah, U.S., set aside in 1915 to preserve rich fossil beds that include dinosaur remains. The monument was enlarged from its original 80 acres (32 hectares) to 326 square miles (844 square km) in 1938 to protect the

  • Dinosaur Provincial Park (park, Alberta, Canada)

    Dinosaur Provincial Park, public park located in the badlands of southeastern Alberta, Canada. The nearly 29-square-mile (75-square-km) park is best known for its extensive fossil beds, within which have been identified some 35 different species of dinosaurs from the Late Cretaceous Epoch (about

  • Dinosauria (fossil reptile)

    Dinosaur, the common name given to a group of reptiles, often very large, that first appeared roughly 245 million years ago (near the beginning of the Middle Triassic Epoch) and thrived worldwide for nearly 180 million years. Most died out by the end of the Cretaceous Period, about 66 million years

  • dinosauromorph (fossil reptile)

    Dinosauromorph, any of a group of archosaurian reptiles that includes dinosaurs and all other reptiles bearing a closer evolutionary relationship to dinosaurs than to pterosaurs. Dinosaurs include birds and other theropods, sauropodomorphs, and ornithischians—familiar animals that embody the

  • Dinosaurs on the Roof (novel by Rabe)

    David Rabe: …a work of black humour; Dinosaurs on the Roof (2008); and Girl by the Road at Night (2009). A Primitive Heart (2005) is a collection of his short stories.

  • dinozoa (protist)
  • Dinshaway Incident (Egyptian history)

    Dinshaway Incident, confrontation in 1906 between residents of the Egyptian village of Dinshaway (Dinshawāy) and British officers during the occupation of Egypt by Great Britain (1882–1952). Harsh exemplary punishments dealt to a number of villagers in the wake of the incident sparked an outcry

  • Dinshwai Incident (Egyptian history)

    Dinshaway Incident, confrontation in 1906 between residents of the Egyptian village of Dinshaway (Dinshawāy) and British officers during the occupation of Egypt by Great Britain (1882–1952). Harsh exemplary punishments dealt to a number of villagers in the wake of the incident sparked an outcry

  • Dinur, Benzion (Jewish historian)

    Judaism: Developments in scholarship: …(1952–83), and in Israel by Ben-Zion Dinur (1884–1973), whose chief work was Yisrael ba-gola (3rd ed., 5 vol., 1961–66; “Israel in the Exile”). Many other first-rank scholars in Europe, Israel, and the United States have made notable contributions to the study of Jewish history, rabbinics, and mysticism.

  • Dinwiddie, Robert (British colonial administrator)

    Robert Dinwiddie, British colonial administrator who as lieutenant governor of Virginia helped precipitate the French and Indian War. After working as a merchant, Dinwiddie entered British government service in 1727 as collector of the customs for Bermuda. In 1738 he was appointed surveyor general

  • Dinystr Jerusalem (poem by Eben Fardd)

    Eben Fardd: His best-known poems include Dinystr Jerusalem (“Destruction of Jerusalem”), an ode that won the prize at the Welshpool eisteddfod (1824); Job, which won at Liverpool (1840); and Maes Bosworth (“Bosworth Field”), which won at Llangollen (1858). In addition to his eisteddfodic compositions, he wrote many hymns, a collection of…

  • Dio (India)

    Diu, town, Daman and Diu union territory, western India. It is situated on an island in the Gulf of Khambhat (Cambay) of the Arabian Sea, off the southern tip of the Kathiawar Peninsula in southeastern Gujarat state. Diu Island is about 7 miles (11 km) long and 2 miles (3 km) wide. It is known for

  • Dio Cassius (Roman historian)

    Dio Cassius, Roman administrator and historian, the author of Romaika, a history of Rome, written in Greek, that is a most important authority for the last years of the republic and the early empire. The son of Cassius Apronianus, governor of Dalmatia and Cilicia under Marcus Aurelius, and grandson

  • Dio Chrysostom (Greek philosopher)

    Dio Chrysostom, (Latin: “Dio the Golden-Mouthed”) Greek rhetorician and philosopher who won fame in Rome and throughout the empire for his writings and speeches. Dio was banished in 82 ce for political reasons from both Bithynia and Italy. He wandered for 14 years through the lands near the Black

  • Dio Cocceianus (Roman historian)

    Dio Cassius, Roman administrator and historian, the author of Romaika, a history of Rome, written in Greek, that is a most important authority for the last years of the republic and the early empire. The son of Cassius Apronianus, governor of Dalmatia and Cilicia under Marcus Aurelius, and grandson

  • Dio of Prusa (Greek philosopher)

    Dio Chrysostom, (Latin: “Dio the Golden-Mouthed”) Greek rhetorician and philosopher who won fame in Rome and throughout the empire for his writings and speeches. Dio was banished in 82 ce for political reasons from both Bithynia and Italy. He wandered for 14 years through the lands near the Black

  • Dio ti salve (novels by Bacchelli)

    The Mill on the Po, trilogy of novels by Riccardo Bacchelli, first published in Italian as Il mulino del Po in 1938–40. The work, considered Bacchelli’s masterpiece, dramatizes the conflicts and struggles of several generations of a family of millers. The first two volumes, Dio ti salve (1938; “God

  • Dio, Lucius Cassius (Roman historian)

    Dio Cassius, Roman administrator and historian, the author of Romaika, a history of Rome, written in Greek, that is a most important authority for the last years of the republic and the early empire. The son of Cassius Apronianus, governor of Dalmatia and Cilicia under Marcus Aurelius, and grandson

  • Dio, Ronnie James (American singer)

    Ronnie James Dio, (Ronald James Padavona), American rock singer (born July 10, 1942, Portsmouth, N.H.—died May 16, 2010, Los Angeles, Calif.), fronted the heavy metal bands Rainbow, Black Sabbath, and Dio with soaring, nearly operatic vocals and a theatrical stage persona. He was also credited with

  • Dio: formazione e sviluppo del monoteismo nella storia delle religioni (work by Pettazzoni)

    study of religion: Other studies and emphases: …work in this connection was Dio: formazione e sviluppo del monoteismo nella storia delle religioni (“God: Formation and Development of Monotheism in the History of Religions”), by the Italian historian of religion Raffaele Pettazzoni (1883–1959), who emphasized the importance of the divinized sky in the development of monotheism. He was…

  • diocese (administrative unit)

    Diocese, in some Christian churches, a territorial area administered by a bishop. The word originally referred to a governmental area in the Roman Empire, governed by an imperial vicar. The secular diocese was subdivided into provinces, each with its own governor; but, in the ecclesiastical

  • dioch (bird species, Quelea quelea)

    Quelea, (Quelea quelea), small brownish bird of Africa, belonging to the songbird family Ploceidae (order Passeriformes). It occurs in such enormous numbers that it often destroys grain crops and, by roosting, breaks branches. Efforts to control quelea populations with poisons, napalm, pathogens,

  • Diocles (Greek philosopher and physician)

    Diocles, philosopher and pioneer in medicine, among Greek physicians second only to Hippocrates in reputation and ability, according to tradition. A resident of Athens, Diocles was the first to write medical treatises in Attic Greek rather than in the Ionic Greek customarily used for such writings;

  • Diocles (Roman emperor)

    Diocletian, Roman emperor (284–305 ce) who restored efficient government to the empire after the near anarchy of the 3rd century. His reorganization of the fiscal, administrative, and military machinery of the empire laid the foundation for the Byzantine Empire in the East and temporarily shored up

  • Dioclesian (work by Purcell)

    Henry Purcell: Music for theatre: …merely incidental music—notably music for Dioclesian (1690), adapted by Thomas Betterton from the tragedy The Prophetess, by John Fletcher and Philip Massinger; for King Arthur (1691), by John Dryden, designed from the first as an entertainment with music; and for The Fairy Queen (1692), an anonymous adaptation of Shakespeare’s A…

  • Diocletian (Roman emperor)

    Diocletian, Roman emperor (284–305 ce) who restored efficient government to the empire after the near anarchy of the 3rd century. His reorganization of the fiscal, administrative, and military machinery of the empire laid the foundation for the Byzantine Empire in the East and temporarily shored up

  • Diocletian window (architecture)

    Diocletian window, semicircular window or opening divided into three compartments by two vertical mullions. Diocletian windows were named for those windows found in the Thermae, or Baths, of Diocletian (now the church of Santa Maria degli Angeli) in Rome. The variant name, thermal window, also

  • Diocletian, Baths of (monument, Rome, Italy)

    construction: Early concrete structures: …is a portion of the Baths of Diocletian (c. 298–306) with a span of 26 metres (85 feet); it was converted into the church of Santa Maria degli Angeli by Michelangelo in the 16th century. The other is the Basilica of Constantine (307–312 ce), also with a span of 26…

  • Diocletian, Palace of (building, Split, Croatia)

    Palace of Diocletian, ancient Roman palace built between 295 and 305 ce at Split (Spalato), Croatia, by the emperor Diocletian as his place of retirement (he renounced the imperial crown in 305 and then lived at Split until his death in 316). The palace constitutes the main part of a UNESCO World

  • dioctahedral structure (chemistry)

    clay mineral: General features: …called trioctahedral, and the latter dioctahedral. If all the anion groups are hydroxyl ions in the compositions of octahedral sheets, the resulting sheets may be expressed by M2+(OH)2 and M3+(OH)3, respectively. Such sheets, called hydroxide sheets, occur singly, alternating with silicate layers in some clay minerals. Brucite, Mg(OH)2, and gibbsite,…

  • Diodati, Charles (English scholar)

    John Milton: Early life and education: Paul’s Milton befriended Charles Diodati, a fellow student who would become his confidant through young adulthood. During his early years, Milton may have heard sermons by the poet John Donne, dean of St. Paul’s Cathedral, which was within view of his school. Educated in Latin and Greek there,…

  • Diodati, Giovanni (Swiss biblical scholar)

    Giovanni Diodati, Swiss Calvinist pastor known for his translation of the Bible into Italian. Born of a refugee Protestant family from Lucca, Diodati became a pastor at Geneva in 1608 and professor of theology in 1609. A leader of the Reformers, he was an eloquent, bold, and fearless preacher and a

  • diode (electron tube)

    Diode, an electrical component that allows the flow of current in only one direction. In circuit diagrams, a diode is represented by a triangle with a line across one vertex. The most common type of diode uses a p-n junction. In this type of diode, one material (n) in which electrons are charge

  • diode (electronics)

    electricity: Electroluminescence: …in a reverse-biased semiconductor p–n junction diode—i.e., a p–n junction diode in which the applied potential is in the direction of small current flow. Electrons in the intense field at the depleted junction easily acquire enough energy to excite atoms. Little of this energy finally emerges as light, though the…

  • diodochoi (ancient Macedonian military officer)

    tactics: Combined infantry and cavalry: …Alexander and his successors (diodochoi) operated on a much greater scale than did most of their predecessors. The most important diodochoi were quite capable of concentrating 80,000 to 100,000 men at a single spot, as did both Ptolemy IV and his Seleucid opponent Antiochus III at Raphia in 217…

  • Diodon hystrix (fish)

    porcupine fish: …the world, especially the species Diodon hystrix. They are related to the puffers and, like them, can inflate their bodies when provoked.

  • Diodontidae (fish)

    Porcupine fish, any of the spiny, shallow-water fishes of the family Diodontidae, found in seas around the world, especially the species Diodon hystrix. They are related to the puffers and, like them, can inflate their bodies when provoked. Porcupine fishes are short and broad-bodied, with large

  • Diodore of Tarsus (Christian theologian)

    patristic literature: The school of Antioch: …century, in the person of Diodore of Tarsus (c. 330–c. 390), that the school of Antioch began to reach the height of its fame. Diodore courageously defended Christ’s divinity against Julian the Apostate, the Roman emperor who attempted to revive paganism, and in his lifetime was regarded as a pillar…

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