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  • dimethylmercury (chemical compound)

    organometallic compound: Historical developments: …a cobalt-carbon (Co―C) bond, and dimethylmercury, H3C―Hg―CH3, which is produced by bacteria to eliminate the toxic metal mercury. However, organometallic compounds are generally unusual in biological processes.

  • dimethyltryptamine (hallucinogen)

    DMT, powerful, naturally occurring hallucinogenic compound structurally related to the drug LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide). DMT blocks the action of serotonin (a transmitter of nerve impulses) in brain tissue. It is inactive when taken by mouth and produces effects only when injected, sniffed, o

  • Dimetrodon (fossil tetrapod)

    Dimetrodon, (genus Dimetrodon), extinct relative of primitive mammals that is characterized by a large, upright, sail-like structure on its back. Dimetrodon lived from about 286 million to 270 million years ago, during the Permian Period, and fossils of the animal have been found in North America.

  • dimictic lake

    lake: Vertical mixing and overturn: …just described, and are called dimictic lakes. Most lakes in temperate regions fall into this category. Lakes that do not cool to below 4 °C undergo overturn only once per year and are called warm monomictic. Lakes that do not warm to above 4 °C also experience only one overturn…

  • dimidiation (heraldry)

    heraldry: Other charges: Impalement means the division of the shield into two equal parts by a straight line from the top to bottom. That method is used to show either the arms of husband and wife, the arms of the husband being in the dexter half, or certain…

  • Diminco (Sierra Leonean company)

    Sierra Leone: Resources and power: The National Diamond Mining Company (Diminco) also mined diamonds until 1995. Mining methods range from mechanical grab lines with washing and separator plants to crude hand digging and panning. Many diamonds are found in river gravels, especially along the Sewa-Bafi river system. Official exports of diamonds…

  • Dimini (ancient town, Greece)

    Vólos: …Neolithic towns of Sesklo and Dimini also stood near present-day Vólos, and just south of it are the ruins of Pagasae, a prominent port from Mycenaean to late Classical times. In 293 bce Pagasae was eclipsed by the newly founded Macedonian town of Demetrias to the north of it.

  • diminished capacity (law)

    Diminished responsibility, legal doctrine that absolves an accused person of part of the liability for his criminal act if he suffers from such abnormality of mind as to substantially impair his responsibility in committing or being a party to an alleged violation. The doctrine of diminished

  • diminished responsibility (law)

    Diminished responsibility, legal doctrine that absolves an accused person of part of the liability for his criminal act if he suffers from such abnormality of mind as to substantially impair his responsibility in committing or being a party to an alleged violation. The doctrine of diminished

  • diminished triad (music)

    triad: …diminished, the triad is a diminished triad. Augmented and diminished triads are dissonant.

  • diminishing marginal productivity, principle of (economics)

    Diminishing returns, economic law stating that if one input in the production of a commodity is increased while all other inputs are held fixed, a point will eventually be reached at which additions of the input yield progressively smaller, or diminishing, increases in output. In the classic

  • diminishing returns (economics)

    Diminishing returns, economic law stating that if one input in the production of a commodity is increased while all other inputs are held fixed, a point will eventually be reached at which additions of the input yield progressively smaller, or diminishing, increases in output. In the classic

  • diminution (music)

    ornamentation: …of ornamentation arose, that of diminution, or division (i.e., dividing the basic melody notes into groups of shorter notes). This technique became codified, and the performer could choose one of several diminution patterns to ornament a phrase. Diminutions were generally cadential (i.e., performed at the end of a section), and…

  • Dimitrijevi?, Dragutin (Serbian army officer)

    Dragutin Dimitrijevi?, Serbian army officer and conspirator, leader of the Serbian secret society Crna Ruka (“Black Hand”). A young army officer and already a member of the Serbian general staff, Dimitrijevi? in 1901 initiated an officers’ conspiracy to assassinate the unpopular king Alexander

  • Dimitrios (Greek patriarch)

    Dimitrios, 269th ecumenical patriarch of the Eastern Orthodox church. After studying at the French lycée in the Galata district of Istanbul, Dimitrios Papadopoulos entered the Holy Trinity School of Theology on the island of Heybeli in the Sea of Marmara. He was ordained a priest in 1942, served

  • Dimitrov Constitution (Bulgarian history)

    Bulgaria: Consolidation of power: …the preparation of the “Dimitrov Constitution,” enacted on December 4, 1947. Modeled closely on the Soviet constitution of 1936, it provided a legal foundation for the reconstruction of the state on communist principles.

  • Dimitrov, Georgi Mikhailovich (Bulgarian communist leader)

    Georgi Mikhailovich Dimitrov, Bulgarian communist leader who became the post-World War II prime minister of Bulgaria. He also won worldwide fame for his defense against Nazi accusations during the German Reichstag Fire trial of 1933. A printer and trade union leader, Dimitrov led the Bulgarian

  • Dimitrov, Vladimir (Bulgarian artist)

    Bulgaria: The arts: …for later artists such as Vladimir Dimitrov, an extremely gifted painter specializing in the rural scenes of his native country; Tsanko Lavrenov, a noted graphic artist and art critic who also painted scenes of old Bulgarian towns; Zlatyo Boyadjiev, noted for his village portraits; and Ilya Petrov, who painted scenes…

  • Dimitrova, Blaga (Bulgarian politician, poet and novelist)

    Bulgaria: The arts: …and playwright Yordan Radichkov, and Blaga Dimitrova, a poet and novelist who served briefly as the vice president of Bulgaria. Other contemporary Bulgarian writers of note included Maria Stankova, Emil Andreev, Georgi Tenev, and Milen Ruskov. (For further discussion, see Bulgarian literature.)

  • Dimitrova, Ghena (Bulgarian singer)

    Ghena Dimitrova, Bulgarian soprano (born May 6, 1941, Beglezh, Bulg.—died June 11, 2005, Milan, Italy), enjoyed a career in major opera houses in Europe and the U.S.; she also sang for several seasons at the Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires. Dimitrova trained at the State Conservatory in Sofia from 1

  • Dimitrovgrad (Bulgaria)

    Dimitrovgrad, town, south-central Bulgaria, in the fertile lowlands of the Maritsa River valley; it is a rail junction on the Belgrade-Sofia-Istanbul rail line. The new town, built in 1947 by Bulgarian youth, incorporated three existing villages—Rakovski, Mariino, and Chernokonovo—and is named

  • Dimitrovgrad (Russia)

    Dimitrovgrad, city, eastern Ulyanovsk oblast (region), western Russia. The city is situated at the confluence of the Melekes and Bolshoy (Great) Cheremshan rivers. It was founded in 1714 and became a town in 1919. It is an agricultural processing centre, with sawmilling and metalworking industries,

  • Dimitrovo (Bulgaria)

    Pernik, town, west-central Bulgaria. The town is located on the banks of the Struma River, 19 miles (31 km) southwest of Sofia. Originally a Bulgarian fortress well-known for repelling the assaults of the Byzantine armies during the early 11th century, Pernik was for five centuries (1396–1878)

  • dimity (fabric)

    Dimity, (from Greek dimitos, “of double thread”), lightweight, sheer cotton fabric with two or more warp threads thrown into relief, forming fine cords. Originally dimity was made of silk or wool, but since the 18th century it has been woven almost exclusively of cotton. The name was applied to two

  • Dimlang Peak (mountain peak, Nigeria)

    Adamawa: …the Shebshi Mountains rise to Mount Dimlang (6,699 feet [2,042 m]) in the state’s southeastern portion. Adamawa state is largely covered by short-grass savanna and is drained westward by the Benue River and its tributaries, including the Gongola, Taraba, and Pai rivers.

  • Dimme (Mesopotamian demon)

    Lamashtu, in Mesopotamian religion, the most terrible of all female demons, daughter of the sky god Anu (Sumerian: An). She slew children and drank the blood of men and ate their flesh. The bearer of seven names, she was often described in incantations as the “seven witches.” Lamashtu perpetrated a

  • dimmer (lighting)

    stagecraft: Dimmers: A dimmer is an electrical device by which the intensity of stage lights connected to it can be controlled. There are two methods used to control the flow of electrical current through a dimmer: mechanical and electronic. Mechanically controlled dimmers require the physical manipulation of an…

  • Dimmesdale, Arthur (fictional character)

    Arthur Dimmesdale, fictional character, a tormented Boston minister in The Scarlet Letter (1850) by Nathaniel Hawthorne. Having fathered Hester Prynne’s illegitimate child, the bachelor Dimmesdale vacillates between the hunger for cleansing confession and the Puritan zeal fueled by his secret

  • Dimocarpus longan (plant and fruit)

    Longan, (Dimocarpus longan), tropical fruit tree of the soapberry family (Sapindaceae), native to Asia and introduced into other warm regions of the world. The edible white-fleshed fruits are somewhat similar to the related lychee and are commonly sold fresh, dried, or canned in syrup. The juicy

  • Dimokratikó Kómma (political party, Cyprus)

    Tassos Papadopoulos: …as leader of the moderate-right Democratic Party (Dimokratikó Kómma; DIKO). Although his EOKA credentials tended to identify him with the right, he was elected with support from the Communist and Social Democrat parties. He billed his campaign as a “ticket of change” and characterized the Clerides administration as being “in…

  • Dimokratikos Synagermos (political party, Cyprus)

    Cyprus: Efforts toward reunification: …2011, gains by the opposition Democratic Rally and a record number of abstentions were interpreted by many as a sign of voter dissatisfaction with the progress of reunification talks.

  • Dimona (Israel)

    Dimona, town of the Negev, southern Israel, on the main highway from Beersheba (Be?er Sheva?) to Sedom (Sodom). It is named for the biblical city of Dimonah, mentioned (Joshua 15:21–22) as “belonging to…Judah in the extreme South.” Modern Dimona was established in 1955 as a residential centre for

  • Dimona Nuclear Research Centre (research facility, Israel)

    nuclear weapon: Israel: …with the organization of the Dimona Nuclear Research Centre to be built in the Negev. Ground was broken at Dimona in late 1958 or early 1959. By 1965 the first plutonium had been produced, and on the eve of the Six-Day War (see Arab-Israeli wars) in June 1967 Israel had…

  • Dimont, Penelope (British author)

    Penelope Mortimer, British journalist and novelist whose writing, depicting a nightmarish world of neuroses and broken marriages, influenced feminist fiction of the 1960s. After her graduation from the University of London, she began to write poetry, book reviews, and short stories. She was married

  • dimorphism, sexual (biology)

    Sexual dimorphism, the differences in appearance between males and females of the same species, such as in colour, shape, size, and structure, that are caused by the inheritance of one or the other sexual pattern in the genetic material. The differences may be extreme, as in the adaptations for

  • Dimorphodon (fossil reptile genus)

    Dimorphodon, (genus Dimorphodon), primitive flying reptiles found as fossils in European deposits from the Early Jurassic Period (200 million to 176 million years ago). Dimorphodon is among the earliest known pterosaurs, an extinct group of reptiles related to the dinosaurs. It was about a metre

  • Dimos (ancient city, Hvar Island, Croatia)

    Hvar: The main towns are Hvar and Stari Grad. Stari Grad Plain, a natural area containing the ruins of stone structures and evidence of the agricultural style of the ancient Greeks, was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2008.

  • Dimri i madh (novel by Kadare)

    Ismail Kadare: …in the 15th century, and Dimri i madh (1977; “The Great Winter”), which depicts the events that produced the break between Albania and the Soviet Union in 1961. Kronik? n? gur (1971; Chronicle in Stone) is an autobiographical novel that is as much about Kadare’s childhood in wartime Albania as…

  • DiMucci, Dion (American singer)

    Dion and the Belmonts: The original members were Dion DiMucci (b. July 18, 1939, New York City, New York, U.S.), Angelo D’Aleo (b. February 3, 1940, New York City, New York), Fred Milano (b. August 26, 1939, New York City, New York—d. January 1, 2012, Long Island, New York), and Carlo Mastrangelo (b.…

  • dimyarianism (mollusk anatomy)

    bivalve: The mantle and musculature: The musculature comprises two (dimyarian) primitively equal (isomyarian) adductor muscles; the anterior and the posterior. The anterior of these may be reduced (anisomyarian; heteromyarian) or lost (monomyarian). Only very rarely is the posterior lost and the anterior retained.

  • Dimyat (Egypt)

    Damietta, city, capital of Dumyā? mu?āfa?ah (governorate), in the Nile River delta, Lower Egypt, on the Mediterranean coast. Damietta, the port of the governorate, is located 8 miles (13 km) from the Mediterranean, on the right (east) bank of the Damietta branch of the Nile. The name is a

  • Din in the Head, The (essays by Ozick)

    Cynthia Ozick: … (1996), Quarrel & Quandary (2000), The Din in the Head (2006), and Critics, Monsters, Fanatics, and Other Literary Essays (2016).

  • Din Panah (historical city, India)

    Delhi: History: …1533 founded a new city, Din Panah, on the bank of the Yamuna River. Shēr Shah, who overthrew Humāyūn in 1540, razed Din Panah to the ground and built his new capital, the Sher Shahi, now known as Purana Qila fort, in southeastern Delhi.

  • DIN system (photography)

    technology of photography: Sensitometry and speed: …the speed (and matching the DIN speeds still used in parts of Europe). A film of 200/24° ISO is twice as fast (and for a given subject requires half as much exposure) as a film of 100/21° ISO, or half as fast as a film of 400/27° ISO.

  • Din tj?nare h?r (work by Lidman)

    Sara Lidman: In this series—which includes Din tj?nare h?r (1977; “Your Servant Is Listening”), Vredens barn (1979; “The Children of Wrath”), Nabots sten (1981; Naboth’s Stone), and J?rnkronan (1985; “The Iron Crown”)—she recreated a world of preindustrial history, dialects, and biblical imagination, of physical hardship and provincial sentiments depicted with narrative…

  • Dīn-e Ilāhī (Indian religion)

    Dīn-i Ilāhī, (Persian: “Divine Faith”), an elite eclectic religious movement, which never numbered more than 19 adherents, formulated by the Mughal emperor Akbar in the late 16th century ad. The Dīn-i Ilāhī was essentially an ethical system, prohibiting such sins as lust, sensuality, slander, and

  • Dīn-i Ilāhī (Indian religion)

    Dīn-i Ilāhī, (Persian: “Divine Faith”), an elite eclectic religious movement, which never numbered more than 19 adherents, formulated by the Mughal emperor Akbar in the late 16th century ad. The Dīn-i Ilāhī was essentially an ethical system, prohibiting such sins as lust, sensuality, slander, and

  • Dina (biblical figure)

    Dinah, in the Old Testament (Genesis 30:21; 34; 46:15), daughter of Jacob by Leah; Dinah was abducted and raped near the city of Shechem, by Shechem, son of Hamor the Hivite (the Hivites were a Canaanitish people). Because Shechem then wished to marry Dinah, Hamor suggested to Jacob that their t

  • Dinagat gymnure (mammal)

    gymnure: The Dinagat gymnure (P. aureospinula) of Dinagat Island and the Siargao Islands, north of Mindanao, has a larger body (19 to 21 cm [7.5 to 8.3 inches] long), with spiny golden brown fur above and soft grayish fur below. The scantily furred, unpigmented tail of both…

  • Dinah (song)

    Ethel Waters: …was particularly identified with “Dinah” and “Stormy Weather.”

  • Dinah (biblical figure)

    Dinah, in the Old Testament (Genesis 30:21; 34; 46:15), daughter of Jacob by Leah; Dinah was abducted and raped near the city of Shechem, by Shechem, son of Hamor the Hivite (the Hivites were a Canaanitish people). Because Shechem then wished to marry Dinah, Hamor suggested to Jacob that their t

  • Dinajpur (Bangladesh)

    Dinajpur, city, northwestern Bangladesh. It lies on the Punarbhaba River, just northeast of the border with Sikkim state in India. Dinajpur is located on a flat alluvial plain intersected by rivers and broken by the slightly elevated Barind region. It is an important rice-, wheat-, jute-, and

  • Dinan (France)

    Dinan, town, northwestern France, in C?tes-d’Armor département, Brittany région, dominating the upper Rance estuary. It stands on a height above the left bank of the river 14 miles (22 km) south of the coast at Dinard. It has preserved many medieval timbered houses, as well as its fine 18th-century

  • Dinan, Saint (Celtic missionary)

    St. Ninian, ; feast day September 16), bishop generally credited as the first Christian missionary to Scotland, responsible for widespread conversions among the Celts and possibly the Southern Picts. The two primary historical sources about Ninian’s life and work are of dubious reliability.

  • dinanderie (metalwork)

    Dinanderie, type of late medieval brass ware made in and around Dinant, Belg. Brass does not appear to have been used extensively in Europe until the 11th or 12th century, when a considerable industry was established in the Low Countries in the district near the Meuse (Maas) River. By the 15th

  • Dinant (Belgium)

    dinanderie: …the 15th century its centre, Dinant, had become a prosperous town the name of which was synonymous with excellent brass ware. Included in the production were such domestic articles as ewers, fire irons, candlesticks, dishes, and basins and such ecclesiastical objects as censers, aquamaniles, fonts, and lecterns.

  • Dinantian Subsystem (geochronology)

    Kanimblan orogeny: …Australia toward the end of Early Carboniferous time (about 318 million years ago). Uplift and deformation occurred in a wide belt extending from Tasmania to Cape York. The Kanimblan was the most severe orogenic episode to affect the Tasman Geosyncline.

  • Dinapate wrighti (beetle)

    branch and twig borer: However, the palm borer (Dinapate wrighti) of western North America, is about 50 mm long. The apple twig, or grape cane, borer (Amphicerus bicaudatus) bores into living fruit-tree branches and grape vines but breeds in dead wood. The lead-cable borer, or short-circuit beetle (Scobicia declivis), bores into…

  • Dinapore (India)

    Dinapur Nizamat, city, northern Bihar state, northeastern India. It is situated on the Ganges (Ganga) River, about 15 miles (25 km) west of Patna. The city is a major road and rail junction and an agricultural trade centre. Industries include printing, oilseed milling, and metalworks. There is a

  • Dinapur Nizamat (India)

    Dinapur Nizamat, city, northern Bihar state, northeastern India. It is situated on the Ganges (Ganga) River, about 15 miles (25 km) west of Patna. The city is a major road and rail junction and an agricultural trade centre. Industries include printing, oilseed milling, and metalworks. There is a

  • dinar (currency)

    Dinar, monetary unit used in several Middle Eastern countries, including Algeria, Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Libya, and Tunisia. It was first introduced as an “Islamic coinage” in the late 7th century ce by ?Abd al-Malik, the fifth caliph (685–705) of the Umayyad dynasty. The dinar dates from

  • Dinar (Turkey)

    Apamea Cibotus: …by the modern town of Dinar, Tur. Founded by Antiochus I Soter in the 3rd century bc, it superseded the ancient Celaenae and placed it in a commanding position on the great east–west trade route of the Seleucid Empire. In the 2nd century bc Apamea passed to Roman rule and…

  • Dinara Planina (mountains, Europe)

    Dinaric Alps, southeastern division of the Eastern Alps, running parallel to the Dalmatian (Adriatic) coast from roughly Trieste (Italy) and Slovenia south to Albania. The Dinaric Alps are bounded approximately by the So?a (Isonzo) and Sava rivers (north), the Drina River (south), the Kolubara,

  • Dinarchus (Greek speech writer)

    Dinarchus, professional speech writer at Athens whose work is generally thought to reflect the incipient decline of Attic oratory. As a metic, or resident alien, he could not participate directly in the political life of Athens. Dinarchus came to prominence in the scandal that followed the flight

  • Dinard (France)

    Dinard, fashionable seaside resort in the Ille-et-Vilaine département, Brittany région, northwestern France, on a rocky promontory at the mouth of the Rance River opposite Saint-Malo. The locality was a fishing village until the middle of the 19th century, when it began to be frequented by British

  • Dinaric Alps (mountains, Europe)

    Dinaric Alps, southeastern division of the Eastern Alps, running parallel to the Dalmatian (Adriatic) coast from roughly Trieste (Italy) and Slovenia south to Albania. The Dinaric Alps are bounded approximately by the So?a (Isonzo) and Sava rivers (north), the Drina River (south), the Kolubara,

  • Dinarsko Gorje (mountains, Europe)

    Dinaric Alps, southeastern division of the Eastern Alps, running parallel to the Dalmatian (Adriatic) coast from roughly Trieste (Italy) and Slovenia south to Albania. The Dinaric Alps are bounded approximately by the So?a (Isonzo) and Sava rivers (north), the Drina River (south), the Kolubara,

  • Dīnawarī, al- (astronomer, botanist, and historian)

    Al-Dīnawarī, astronomer, botanist, and historian, of Persian or Kurdish origin, whose interest in Hellenism and the Arabic humanities has been compared to that of the Iraqi scholar al-Jā?i?. Al-Dīnawarī studied philology in the Iraqi cities of Basra and Kūfah. The systematic approach to learning

  • Dinbych (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Denbigh, market town, historic and present county of Denbighshire (Sir Ddinbych), northern Wales. It is situated just west of the River Clwyd, about 10 miles (16 km) south of Rhyl. After the English king Edward I conquered Wales, Henry de Lacy, 3rd earl of Lincoln, founded a borough there in 1283

  • Dinbych-y-pysgod (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Tenby, market town and resort, historic and present county of Pembrokeshire, southwestern Wales. It is situated within Pembrokeshire Coast National Park on the western shore of Carmarthen Bay, about 10 miles (16 km) east of Pembroke. Though Scandinavian settlement probably occurred there, the town

  • Dindar River (river, Africa)

    Dinder River, tributary of the Blue Nile, rising in the Ethiopian highlands west of Lake Tana. It flows northwest past Dongur, descends into the Sudanese plain, and runs in numerous meanders to join the Blue Nile below Sannār, Sudan. The river, 300 miles (480 km) long, is navigable for the lower

  • Dinder National Park (national park, Sudan)

    Dinder National Park, park, southeastern Sudan. The park lies in the clayish floodplain of the Dinder and Rahad rivers, at an elevation of 2,300 to 2,600 feet (700 to 800 metres). Established in 1935, it covers an area of 2,750 square mi (7,123 square km). Vegetation in the park consists of

  • Dinder River (river, Africa)

    Dinder River, tributary of the Blue Nile, rising in the Ethiopian highlands west of Lake Tana. It flows northwest past Dongur, descends into the Sudanese plain, and runs in numerous meanders to join the Blue Nile below Sannār, Sudan. The river, 300 miles (480 km) long, is navigable for the lower

  • dindi (Indian folk dance)

    South Asian arts: Folk dance: …religious folk dances are the dindi and kala dances of Maharashtra, which are expressions of religious ecstasy. The dancers revolve in a circle, beating short sticks (dindis) to keep time with the chorus leader and a drummer in the middle. As the rhythm accelerates, the dancers form into two rows,…

  • Dindigul (India)

    Dindigul, city, central Tamil Nadu state, southern India. It is situated between the Palni and Sirumalai hills on a tributary of the Kaveri (Cauvery) River. The city’s name is derived from the words tintu kal (“pillow rock”), which refers to the bare hill dominating Dindigul. The fortress, built on

  • Dindshenchas (collection of legends)

    Dindshenchas, (Gaelic: “Lore of Places”), studies in Gaelic prose and verse of the etymology and history of place-names in Ireland—e.g., of streams, raths (strongholds of ancient Irish chiefs), mounds, and rocks. These studies were preserved in variant forms in monastic manuscripts dating from as

  • Dindymene (ancient deity)

    Great Mother of the Gods, ancient Oriental and Greco-Roman deity, known by a variety of local names; the name Cybele or Cybebe predominates in Greek and Roman literature from about the 5th century bc onward. Her full official Roman name was Mater Deum Magna Idaea (Great Idaean Mother of the Gods).

  • Dine, James (American artist)

    Jim Dine, American painter, graphic artist, sculptor, and poet who emerged during the Pop art period as an innovative creator of works that combine the painted canvas with ordinary objects of daily life. His persistent themes included those of personal identity, memory, and the body. Dine studied

  • Dine, Jim (American artist)

    Jim Dine, American painter, graphic artist, sculptor, and poet who emerged during the Pop art period as an innovative creator of works that combine the painted canvas with ordinary objects of daily life. His persistent themes included those of personal identity, memory, and the body. Dine studied

  • Dinello, Paul (American actor, writer, and director)

    Stephen Colbert: …he met Amy Sedaris and Paul Dinello, with whom he created the award-winning sketch show Exit 57 (1995–96) and the bizarre sitcom Strangers with Candy (1999–2000), both on the Comedy Central cable network. Colbert worked on several other television projects before joining in 1997 Comedy Central’s The Daily Show, which…

  • Dinemellia dinemelli (bird)

    buffalo weaver: The white-headed buffalo weaver (Dinemellia dinemelli), confined to eastern Africa, is brown and white, with red rump and vent. Both are stout-bodied, heavy-billed birds 20–25 cm (8–10 inches) long. In breeding season the male’s bill becomes whitish and swollen at the base. Buffalo weavers live in…

  • Diner (film by Levinson [1982])

    Barry Levinson: …made his directorial debut with Diner (1982), a coming-of-age story that was the first of several movies set in his native city, Baltimore, Maryland. He was again nominated for an Oscar, for his screenplay for Diner. He continued to earn acclaim with such films as The Natural (1984), which starred…

  • Diners’ Club, Inc. (American corporation)

    credit card: …establishments, was introduced by the Diners’ Club, Inc., in 1950. Another major card of this type, known as a travel and entertainment card, was established by the American Express Company in 1958. Under this system, the credit card company charges its cardholders an annual fee and bills them on a…

  • Dines, William Henry (British meteorologist)

    William Henry Dines, British meteorologist who invented instruments to measure atmospheric properties. The son of a meteorologist, Dines was graduated from Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, with honours. He became interested in wind speed and invented a pressure-tube anemometer, the first device

  • Dinesen, Isak (Danish author)

    Isak Dinesen, Danish writer whose finely crafted stories, set in the past and pervaded with an aura of supernaturalism, incorporate the themes of eros and dreams. Educated privately and at the Academy of Fine Arts, Copenhagen, Dinesen married her cousin, Baron Bror Blixen-Finecke, in 1914 and went

  • Dineutus americanus (insect)

    whirligig beetle: In Dineutus americanus this fluid smells like apples.

  • Dinezon, Jacob (author)

    Yiddish literature: The classic writers: His lifetime friend Jacob (Yankev) Dinezon wrote several novels. Dinezon began publishing in Yiddish in 1877, before Peretz, and he was in contact with writers such as Isaac Meir Dik in Vilna. His first published novel, Hane?ehovim ve-hane?imim oder der shvartser yungermantshik (1877; “The Beloved and the Pleasant; or, The…

  • Dinezon, Yankev (author)

    Yiddish literature: The classic writers: His lifetime friend Jacob (Yankev) Dinezon wrote several novels. Dinezon began publishing in Yiddish in 1877, before Peretz, and he was in contact with writers such as Isaac Meir Dik in Vilna. His first published novel, Hane?ehovim ve-hane?imim oder der shvartser yungermantshik (1877; “The Beloved and the Pleasant; or, The…

  • ding (vessel)

    Ding, (Chinese: “tripod”) type of ancient Chinese cooking or holding vessel, usually with two handles on the rim, that is supported by three or four columnar legs. Two variations of the ding include the li-ding, which has a slight swelling of the bowl as it joins each of the legs (similar in effect

  • Ding Ling (Chinese author)

    Ding Ling, one of China’s most popular 20th-century authors. In her early career Ding Ling initially wrote highly successful short stories centring on young, unconventional Chinese women. About 1930, with a distinct change in her artistic tendency, she became a major literary figure of the

  • Ding ware (Chinese stoneware)

    Ding ware, Chinese glazed stoneware produced for many centuries, beginning in the 8th century ad. Usually white in colour, Ding ware is either plain or decorated with incised, molded, impressed, or carved designs, among which the phoenix, lily, and peony are popular. The most important types of

  • Ding-an-sich (philosophy)

    rationalism: Epistemological rationalism in modern philosophies: …causality—represents an order holding among things-in-themselves (German Dinge-an-sich) cannot be known. Kant’s rationalism was thus the counterpart of a profound skepticism.

  • Dingaan (Zulu king of Natal)

    Dingane, Zulu king (1828–40) who assumed power after taking part in the murder of his half brother Shaka in 1828. Very little is known of Zulu politics prior to 1828, but by 1827 the kingdom was rife with factional rivalries that centred on some of Shaka’s brothers and white mercenary traders. The

  • Dingaan’s Day (South African holiday)

    Day of Reconciliation, public holiday observed in South Africa on December 16. The holiday originally commemorated the victory of the Voortrekkers (southern Africans of Dutch, German, or Huguenot descent who made the Great Trek) over the Zulus at the Battle of Blood River in 1838. Before the

  • Dingane (Zulu king of Natal)

    Dingane, Zulu king (1828–40) who assumed power after taking part in the murder of his half brother Shaka in 1828. Very little is known of Zulu politics prior to 1828, but by 1827 the kingdom was rife with factional rivalries that centred on some of Shaka’s brothers and white mercenary traders. The

  • Dingane’s Day (South African holiday)

    Day of Reconciliation, public holiday observed in South Africa on December 16. The holiday originally commemorated the victory of the Voortrekkers (southern Africans of Dutch, German, or Huguenot descent who made the Great Trek) over the Zulus at the Battle of Blood River in 1838. Before the

  • Dingelstedt, Franz Ferdinand, Freiherr von (German writer and producer)

    Franz Ferdinand, count von Dingelstedt, German poet, playwright, and theatrical producer known for his biting political satires. A member of the liberal Young Germany movement, Dingelstedt wrote political satires against the German princes, notably Die Neuen Argonauten (1839; “The New Argonauts”)

  • Dinghai (China)

    Zhoushan Archipelago: Dinghai, the chief town of the archipelago, is a walled city located some distance inland on Zhoushan Island; it is connected to the coast by a short canal. Dinghai became the administrative centre when the Qing dynasty transferred the administration of the islands from the…

  • dinghy (boat)

    Dinghy, any of various small boats. Rowboats or sailboats called dinghies are used to carry passengers or cargo along the coasts of India, especially in the sheltered waters around the peninsula. As a small ship’s boat in other countries, the dinghy may be a rowboat but more often is powered and

  • Dingirmakh (Mesopotamian deity)

    Ninhursag, in Mesopotamian religion, city goddess of Adab and of Kish in the northern herding regions; she was the goddess of the stony, rocky ground, the hursag. In particular, she had the power in the foothills and desert to produce wildlife. Especially prominent among her offspring were the

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