You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Dicentrarchus labrax (fish)

    sea bass: The better-known moronids include the European bass (Morone, or Dicentrarchus, labrax), found from Scandinavia to the Mediterranean, often in river mouths; the striped bass, or striper, a renowned American food and sport fish striped with black and growing to about 14 kg (30 pounds); the white bass (M. chrysops), a…

  • DICER (enzyme)

    RNA interference: RNAi in nature: …by an enzyme known as DICER. The mature miRNA molecule then binds to an RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which contains multiple proteins, including a ribonuclease enzyme. The miRNA nucleotide sequence directs the protein complex to bind to a complementary sequence of mRNA. Once bound to the mRNA, the miRNA-RISC complex…

  • Diceria dell’untore (work by Bufalino)

    Italian literature: Fiction at the turn of the 21st century: …first novel, Diceria dell’untore (1981; The Plague-Sower), which he published after a lifelong career in teaching, won the 1981 Campiello Prize for fiction awarded by the industrialists of the Veneto region. He went on to publish several other novels. Il sorriso dell’ignoto marinaio (1976; The Smile of the Unknown Mariner)…

  • Dicerorhinus sumatrensis (mammal)

    Sumatran rhinoceros, (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis), one of three Asian species of rhinoceroses and the smallest living rhinoceros. Both females and males typically weigh less than 850 kg (1,870 pounds); they are 2.5 metres (8 feet) long and 1.5 metres (5 feet) high at the shoulder. Sumatran

  • Diceros bicornis (mammal)

    Black rhinoceros, (Diceros bicornis), the third largest rhinoceros and one of two African species of rhinoceros. The black rhinoceros typically weighs between 700 and 1,300 kg (1,500 and 2,900 pounds); males are the same size as females. It stands 1.5 metres (5 feet) high at the shoulder and is 3.5

  • Dicey, Albert Venn (British jurist)

    Albert Venn Dicey, British jurist whose Lectures Introductory to the Study of the Law of the Constitution (1885) is considered part of the British constitution, which is an amalgam of several written and unwritten authorities. For this treatise, which is noted for its application of legal

  • Dichapetalaceae (plant family)

    Malpighiales: The Chrysobalanaceae group: Dichapetalaceae, and Euphroniaceae, each ovary chamber usually has only two ovules, and the seeds have at most slight endosperm. Within this group, Chrysobalanaceae, Trigoniaceae, Dichapetalaceae, and Euphroniaceae are especially close. All have leaf margins that lack teeth; there are often flat, rarely raised glands on…

  • dichasium (plant structure)

    inflorescence: Determinate inflorescence.: A dichasium is one unit of a cyme and is characterized by a stunted central flower and two lateral flowers on elongated pedicels, as in the wood stichwort (species Stellaria nemorum).

  • dichloro(2-chlorovinyl)arsine (chemical compound)

    Lewisite, in chemical warfare, poison blister gas developed by the United States for use during World War I. Chemically, the substance is dichloro(2-chlorovinyl)arsine, a liquid whose vapour is highly toxic when inhaled or when in direct contact with the skin. It blisters the skin and irritates

  • dichlorobenzene (chemical compound)

    Dichlorobenzene, any of three isomeric organohalogen compounds known as 1,2-, 1,3-, or 1,4-dichlorobenzene (also called ortho-, meta-, and para-dichlorobenzene, respectively). Both 1,2- and 1,3-dichlorobenzene are liquids. 1,2-Dichlorobenzene is used as a solvent, as an insecticide, and in the

  • dichlorodiethyl sulfide (chemical compound)

    chemical weapon: Blister agents: …sulfur mustard, popularly known as mustard gas. Casualties were inflicted when personnel were attacked and exposed to blister agents like sulfur mustard or lewisite. Delivered in liquid or vapour form, such weapons burn the skin, eyes, windpipe, and lungs. The physical results, depending on level of exposure, might be immediate…

  • dichlorodifluoromethane (chemical compound)

    chlorofluorocarbon: …compounds, especially trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) and dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12), found use as aerosol-spray propellants, solvents, and foam-blowing agents. They are well suited for these and other applications because they are nontoxic and nonflammable and can be readily converted from a liquid to a gas and vice versa.

  • dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (chemical compound)

    DDT , a synthetic insecticide belonging to the family of organic halogen compounds, highly toxic toward a wide variety of insects as a contact poison that apparently exerts its effect by disorganizing the nervous system. DDT, prepared by the reaction of chloral with chlorobenzene in the presence of

  • dichloromethane (chemical compound)

    Methylene chloride, a colourless, volatile, practically nonflammable liquid belonging to the family of organic halogen compounds. It is extensively used as a solvent, especially in paint-stripping formulations. Methylene chloride is commercially produced along with methyl chloride, chloroform, and

  • dichogamy (biological process)

    pollination: Structural: …receptive, a situation known as dichogamy. The more usual form of dichogamy, which is found especially in such insect-pollinated flowers as fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium) and salvias (Salvia species), is protandry, in which the stamens ripen before the pistils. Protogyny, the situation in which the pistils mature first, occurs in arum…

  • Dichondra (plant genus)

    Dichondra, any of several species of low, creeping plants of the morning glory family (Convolvulaceae) that are used in warm climates as grass substitutes. The plants are from 2 12 to 8 cm (1 to 3 inches) high and spread by runners. D. carolinensis, native to southeastern North America, is so

  • Dichondra carolinensis (plant)

    Dichondra: D. carolinensis, native to southeastern North America, is so similar to the Old World D. repens that it is sometimes given as D. repens variety carolinensis. Its round, bright-green leaves, indented where they join the long stalks, are 2 cm broad.

  • Dichondra repens carolinensis (plant)

    Dichondra: D. carolinensis, native to southeastern North America, is so similar to the Old World D. repens that it is sometimes given as D. repens variety carolinensis. Its round, bright-green leaves, indented where they join the long stalks, are 2 cm broad.

  • dichoptic eye (zoology)

    dipteran: Eyes: …eyes do not meet (dichoptic). In some families, notably robber flies and small acalyptrate flies, both sexes are dichoptic. Parasitic flies, or those that live in secluded places, may have very small eyes or none at all. Typically, however, the compound eyes of flies contain many facets; for example,…

  • dichotomous branching (plant anatomy)

    angiosperm: Stems: In dichotomous branching, the branches form as a result of an equal division of a terminal bud (i.e., a bud formed at the apex of a stem) into two equal branches that are not derived from axillary buds, although axillary buds are present elsewhere on the…

  • dichotomy (logic)

    Dichotomy, (from Greek dicha, “apart,” and tomos, “cutting”), a form of logical division consisting of the separation of a class into two subclasses, one of which has and the other has not a certain quality or attribute. Men thus may be divided into professional men and men who are not

  • dichroic mirror (optics)

    television: Electron tubes: …of a colour-selective type (a dichroic mirror) that reflected the light of one colour and transmitted the remaining colours. The mirrors, augmented by colour filters that perfected their colour-selective action, directed a blue image to the first tube, a green image to the second, and a red image to the…

  • dichroism (optics)

    pleochroism: …the general term for both dichroism, which is found in uniaxial crystals (crystals with a single optic axis), and trichroism, found in biaxial crystals (two optic axes). It can be observed only in coloured, doubly refracting crystals. When ordinary light is incident on a crystal exhibiting double refraction, the light…

  • dichroite (mineral)

    Cordierite, blue silicate mineral that occurs as crystals or grains in igneous rocks. It typically occurs in thermally altered clay-rich sediments surrounding igneous intrusions and in schists and paragneisses. Precambrian deposits of the Laramie Range, Wyo., U.S., contain more than 500,000 tons of

  • dichromacy (physiology)

    colour blindness: Types of colour blindness: …may be subdivided generally into dichromacy (dichromatism), when only two cone types are functional, and monochromacy (monochromatism), when none or only one type of cone receptor is functional. Dichromatic individuals are ordinarily unable to distinguish between red and green. Blindness to red is known as protanopia, a state in which…

  • Dichromanassa rufescens (bird)

    egret: The reddish egret, Hydranassa (or Dichromanassa) rufescens, of warm coastal regions of North America, has two colour phases: white and dark. The snowy egret, E. (or Leucophoyx) thula, ranging from the United States to Chile and Argentina, is white, about 60 cm long, with filmy recurved…

  • dichromate mineral (mineral compound)

    chromium: Principal compounds: …are the chromate, CrO42?, and dichromate, Cr2O72?, ions. These ions form the basis for a series of industrially important salts. Among them are sodium chromate, Na2CrO4, and sodium dichromate, Na2Cr2O7, which are used in leather tanning, in metal surface treatment, and as catalysts in various industrial processes.

  • dichromatic vision

    human eye: Colour defectiveness: …smaller percentage of females are dichromats; that is, they can mix all the colours of the spectrum, as they see them, with only two primaries instead of three. Thus, protanopes (people with red blindness) require only blue and green to make colour matches. Whereas for people with normal (trichromatic) vision…

  • dichromatic vision (physiology)

    colour blindness: Types of colour blindness: …may be subdivided generally into dichromacy (dichromatism), when only two cone types are functional, and monochromacy (monochromatism), when none or only one type of cone receptor is functional. Dichromatic individuals are ordinarily unable to distinguish between red and green. Blindness to red is known as protanopia, a state in which…

  • dichromatism (physiology)

    colour blindness: Types of colour blindness: …may be subdivided generally into dichromacy (dichromatism), when only two cone types are functional, and monochromacy (monochromatism), when none or only one type of cone receptor is functional. Dichromatic individuals are ordinarily unable to distinguish between red and green. Blindness to red is known as protanopia, a state in which…

  • Dichterleben (work by Tieck)

    Ludwig Tieck: Dichterleben (“A Poet’s Life”; part 1, 1826; part 2, 1831) concerned the early life of Shakespeare. Vittoria Accorombona (1840; The Roman Matron) was a historical novel. In 1842 he accepted the invitation of Frederick William IV of Prussia to go to Berlin, where he remained…

  • Dichtung und Wahrheit (autobiography by Goethe)

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: Napoleonic period (1805–16): …Leben: Dichtung und Wahrheit (1811–13; From My Life: Poetry and Truth).

  • dicing (technology)

    frozen prepared food: Slicing and dicing: …cubes or dices by a dicing machine. A common industrial-scale dicer uses a knife blade attached to a revolving impeller. With each revolution of the impeller, the blade removes a slice from the large pieces of meat that are fed to the machine. The meat slices are cut into squares…

  • Dick (film by Fleming [1999])

    Will Ferrell: …International Man of Mystery (1997); Dick (1999), a satire of the Watergate scandal; and Zoolander (2001; he later appeared in its 2016 sequel as well), a fashion-industry send-up.

  • Dick and Betsy DeVos Family Foundation (American organization)

    Betsy DeVos: …1989 she helped found the Dick and Betsy DeVos Family Foundation, which donated to charter and Christian schools, Christian-related education groups, organizations supporting school choice, and various universities and arts foundations. She and her husband started (2003) a political action committee, All Children Matter, in support of voucher programs. In…

  • Dick Biondi

    The fast-talking wild man of Chicago radio, Dick Biondi called himself “The Screamer,” “The Big Mouth,” “The Big Noise from Buffalo,” “The Wild Eye-tralian,” and “The Supersonic Spaghetti Slurper.” Praising his energy, presentation, and appeal to young listeners, pioneer radio programmer Mike

  • Dick Cavett Show, The (American television show)

    Television in the United States: The late shows: …Joey Bishop Show (ABC, 1967–69), The Dick Cavett Show (ABC, 1968–75), and The Merv Griffin Show (CBS, 1969–72)—but none could compete with The Tonight Show. In 1973 NBC introduced The Midnight Special (1973–81), a rock music variety show that ran from 1:00 am to 2:30 am on Fridays following The…

  • Dick Smith Electronics (Australian company)

    Dick Smith: …first appeared when he founded Dick Smith Electronics in 1968. By the time he sold the firm in 1982, Smith was a household name and his firm was a market leader in selling small electronic items, from calculators to computers. With the proceeds of the sale, he began a new…

  • Dick Smith Foods (Australian company)

    Dick Smith: …he founded a new company, Dick Smith Foods, which distributed products made in Australia by Australian-owned companies and donated all profits to domestic charitable organizations; the business closed in 2019. Smith was noted for other philanthropic endeavours, and in December 2008 he and his wife donated $1 million (Australian) to…

  • Dick test (medicine)

    Dick test, method of determining susceptibility to scarlet fever by injection into the skin of 0.1 cubic centimetre of scarlet fever toxin. A reddening of the skin in an area over 10 millimetres (0.4 inch) in diameter within about 24 hours indicates a lack of immunity to the disease. The test was

  • Dick Tracy (comic strip character)

    Dick Tracy, the hard-boiled hero of Dick Tracy, a newspaper comic strip created by Chester Gould in 1931. Gould originally wanted to name both the detective and the strip Plainclothes Tracy, but he was overruled by Joseph Medill Patterson, owner of The Chicago Tribune–New York News Syndicate. Dick

  • Dick Tracy (cartoon strip)

    comic strip: The comics industry: Pogo and Dick Tracy reached more than 50 million readers in more than 500 newspapers. Superman comics circulated in the 1950s at the rate of 1.5 million monthly; in 1943 American comic books totaled 18 million copies monthly and constituted a third of total magazine sales, to…

  • Dick Tracy (film by Beatty [1990])

    Al Pacino: Academy Award and later films: …gangster Big Boy Caprice in Dick Tracy. Frankie and Johnny (1991) and Glengarry Glen Ross (1992), both adaptations of plays, continued his string of well-received films, and he won a best actor Oscar for his portrayal of a bitter blind man in Scent of a Woman (1992). Pacino’s other notable…

  • Dick Tracy in B-flat (radio program)

    radio: American radio goes to war: …celebrated Command Performance shows was Dick Tracy in B-flat, a special hour-long musical spoof of the comic strip performed on February 5, 1945, and featuring Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Frank Sinatra, Dinah Shore, Jimmy Durante, the Andrews Sisters, Judy Garland, Jerry Colonna, Harry von Zell, Frank Morgan, and Cass Daley—a…

  • Dick Van Dyke Show, The (American television program)

    The Dick Van Dyke Show, American television situation comedy that ran from 1961 to 1966 on the Columbia Broadcasting System (now CBS Corporation). Considered a pioneer in the genre, the show received 15 Emmy Awards during its five seasons. The Dick Van Dyke Show chronicles the professional and

  • Dick, George Frederick (American physician)

    George Frederick Dick, American physician and pathologist who, with his wife, Gladys Henry Dick, discovered the cause of, and devised means of preventing, scarlet fever. Dick studied scarlet fever while serving in the Army Medical Corps in World War I. After the war he was professor of clinical

  • Dick, Gladys Henry (American pathologist)

    George Frederick Dick: …pathologist who, with his wife, Gladys Henry Dick, discovered the cause of, and devised means of preventing, scarlet fever.

  • Dick, Mr. (fictional character)

    Mr. Dick, fictional character in Charles Dickens’s novel David Copperfield (1849–50), a simpleminded but kind man who is a distant relative and treasured friend of David’s Aunt Betsey Trotwood. When Aunt Betsey is unable to decide whether to shelter the runaway David or to give him up to his cruel

  • Dick, Paul Revere (American musician)

    Paul Revere, (Paul Revere Dick), American keyboardist and bandleader (born Jan. 7, 1938, Harvard, Neb.—died Oct. 4, 2014, Garden Valley, Idaho), served from 1960 as the founding keyboardist of the classic rock band Paul Revere & the Raiders, which distinguished itself by performing in concert and

  • Dick, Philip K. (American author)

    Philip K. Dick, American science-fiction writer whose novels and short stories often depict the psychological struggles of characters trapped in illusory environments. Dick worked briefly in radio before studying at the University of California, Berkeley, for one year. The publication of his first

  • Dick, Philip Kindred (American author)

    Philip K. Dick, American science-fiction writer whose novels and short stories often depict the psychological struggles of characters trapped in illusory environments. Dick worked briefly in radio before studying at the University of California, Berkeley, for one year. The publication of his first

  • Dick-Read, Grantly (British obstetrician)

    natural childbirth: In 1933 the British obstetrician Grantly Dick-Read wrote a book entitled Natural Childbirth, in which he postulated that excessive pain in labour results from muscular tension arising from fear of the birth process; he proposed that pregnant women attend a course of study to learn more about the birth process…

  • dickcissel (bird)

    Dickcissel, (Spiza americana), American bird usually placed in the family Cardinalidae. The male dickcissel—named for its song—is a streaky brown bird 16 cm (6.5 inches) long, with a black bib on its yellow breast, looking somewhat like a miniature meadowlark. Dickcissels are seedeaters. They breed

  • Dicke, Robert H. (American physicist)

    Robert H. Dicke, American physicist noted for his theoretical work in cosmology and investigations centring on the general theory of relativity. He also made a number of significant contributions to radar technology and to the field of atomic physics. Dicke received a bachelor’s degree from

  • Dicke, Robert Henry (American physicist)

    Robert H. Dicke, American physicist noted for his theoretical work in cosmology and investigations centring on the general theory of relativity. He also made a number of significant contributions to radar technology and to the field of atomic physics. Dicke received a bachelor’s degree from

  • Dickens, Charles (British novelist)

    Charles Dickens, English novelist, generally considered the greatest of the Victorian era. His many volumes include such works as A Christmas Carol, David Copperfield, Bleak House, A Tale of Two Cities, Great Expectations, and Our Mutual Friend. Dickens enjoyed a wider popularity during his

  • Dickens, Charles John Huffam (British novelist)

    Charles Dickens, English novelist, generally considered the greatest of the Victorian era. His many volumes include such works as A Christmas Carol, David Copperfield, Bleak House, A Tale of Two Cities, Great Expectations, and Our Mutual Friend. Dickens enjoyed a wider popularity during his

  • Dickens, James Cecil (American singer)

    Jimmy Dickens, (James Cecil Dickens; “ Little Jimmy Dickens”; “Tater”), American country music singer (born Dec. 19, 1920, Bolt, W.Va.—died Jan. 2, 2015, Nashville, Tenn.), had a powerful voice, though he was diminutive in size (1.5 m [4 ft 11 in]), and enjoyed a successful career of some 50 years

  • Dickens, Jimmy (American singer)

    Jimmy Dickens, (James Cecil Dickens; “ Little Jimmy Dickens”; “Tater”), American country music singer (born Dec. 19, 1920, Bolt, W.Va.—died Jan. 2, 2015, Nashville, Tenn.), had a powerful voice, though he was diminutive in size (1.5 m [4 ft 11 in]), and enjoyed a successful career of some 50 years

  • Dickerson v. United States (law case)

    confession: Confession in contemporary U.S. law: …was the court’s decision in Dickerson v. United States (2000), which overturned an appeals court ruling that had upheld the admissibility as evidence of non-Mirandized statements from a bank robbery suspect on the grounds that Miranda had been effectively superseded by a 1968 federal law that declared all voluntary confessions…

  • Dickerson, Carroll (American musician)

    Earl Hines: In 1925–26 he toured with Carroll Dickerson’s orchestra. When Louis Armstrong took over Dickerson’s band in 1927, Hines stayed on as pianist and musical director. He participated in several groundbreaking recording sessions at about this time, including several as a member of Armstrong’s seminal quintet, the Hot Five, and others…

  • Dickerson, Eric (American football player)

    Eric Dickerson, American professional gridiron football player who was one of the leading running backs in National Football League (NFL) history. Dickerson played his college football at Southern Methodist University (SMU) in University Park, Texas, where he and Craig James formed a stellar

  • Dickerson, Eric Demetric (American football player)

    Eric Dickerson, American professional gridiron football player who was one of the leading running backs in National Football League (NFL) history. Dickerson played his college football at Southern Methodist University (SMU) in University Park, Texas, where he and Craig James formed a stellar

  • Dickerson, Nancy (American journalist)

    Nancy Dickerson, American journalist and author who was a pioneer in television reporting, serving as the first female news correspondent at CBS (1960) and producing award-winning documentaries; her autobiography, Among Those Present (1976), attributed part of her success to contacts she

  • Dickey, Bill (American baseball player)

    Bill Dickey, professional baseball player who caught for the New York Yankees (1928–43 and 1946) of the American League. Dickey spanned two eras in Yankee history, playing at the end of Babe Ruth’s career and during the careers of legends Lou Gehrig and Joe DiMaggio. Dickey competed in eight World

  • Dickey, James (American poet)

    James Dickey, American poet, novelist, and critic best known for his poetry combining themes of nature mysticism, religion, and history and for his novel Deliverance (1970). Dickey attended Clemson College in South Carolina before serving as a fighter-bomber pilot in the U.S. Army Air Forces during

  • Dickey, James Lafayette (American poet)

    James Dickey, American poet, novelist, and critic best known for his poetry combining themes of nature mysticism, religion, and history and for his novel Deliverance (1970). Dickey attended Clemson College in South Carolina before serving as a fighter-bomber pilot in the U.S. Army Air Forces during

  • Dickey, Sarah Ann (American educator)

    Sarah Ann Dickey, American educator who devoted her efforts in the post-Civil War United States to creating and enhancing educational opportunities for African-American students. Dickey had almost no schooling until she was 16, but her determined progress thereafter was rapid, and at the age of 19

  • Dickey, William A. (American prospector)

    Denali: …was applied in 1896 by William A. Dickey, another prospector, in honour of William McKinley (who was elected president of the United States later that year) and became the official name. Efforts began in the mid-1970s to restore the mountain’s original Native American name but faced opposition, mainly from lawmakers…

  • Dickey, William Malcolm (American baseball player)

    Bill Dickey, professional baseball player who caught for the New York Yankees (1928–43 and 1946) of the American League. Dickey spanned two eras in Yankee history, playing at the end of Babe Ruth’s career and during the careers of legends Lou Gehrig and Joe DiMaggio. Dickey competed in eight World

  • Dickinson (North Dakota, United States)

    Dickinson, city, seat (1883) of Stark county, southwestern North Dakota, U.S. It lies on the Heart River, about 100 miles (160 km) west of Bismarck. Founded in 1880 as a stop on the Northern Pacific Railway and originally called Pleasant Valley Siding, it was renamed in 1882 for Wells S. Dickinson,

  • Dickinson College (college, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Dickinson College, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, U.S. It is a liberal arts college offering undergraduate degrees in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences and in preprofessional fields. Students may spend the summer abroad in one of

  • Dickinson Dam (dam, United States)

    Dickinson: The Dickinson Dam, a part of the reclamation plan for the Missouri River valley, impounds Edward Arthur Patterson Lake just southwest of the city. The Dickinson Museum Center houses exhibits and collections pertaining to natural and regional history as well as cultural heritage. The Ukrainian Cultural…

  • Dickinson Seminary (college, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Lycoming College, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, U.S. It is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Emphasizing a curriculum in the liberal arts, the college offers bachelor’s degrees in more than 30 fields and several preprofessional

  • Dickinson, Angie (American actress)

    Brian De Palma: The 1980s and ’90s: Angie Dickinson starred as a sexually frustrated Manhattan housewife who, after sleeping with a stranger, is brutally murdered—in a chilling elevator sequence that recalls the famous shower scene from Psycho—and the search begins to find her killer. Nancy Allen, De Palma’s wife at that time,…

  • Dickinson, Anna Elizabeth (American lecturer)

    Anna Elizabeth Dickinson, American lecturer on abolitionism, women’s rights, and other reform topics, remembered for the articulate but emotionally blistering rhetoric that characterized her speaking style. Dickinson grew up in poverty. Her formal education took place mainly at the Friends’ Select

  • Dickinson, Emily (American poet)

    Emily Dickinson, American lyric poet who lived in seclusion and commanded a singular brilliance of style and integrity of vision. With Walt Whitman, Dickinson is widely considered to be one of the two leading 19th-century American poets. Only 10 of Emily Dickinson’s nearly 1,800 poems are known to

  • Dickinson, Emily Elizabeth (American poet)

    Emily Dickinson, American lyric poet who lived in seclusion and commanded a singular brilliance of style and integrity of vision. With Walt Whitman, Dickinson is widely considered to be one of the two leading 19th-century American poets. Only 10 of Emily Dickinson’s nearly 1,800 poems are known to

  • Dickinson, John (United States statesman)

    John Dickinson, American statesman often referred to as the “penman of the Revolution.” Born in Maryland, Dickinson moved with his family to Dover, Del., in 1740. He studied law in London at the Middle Temple and practiced law in Philadelphia (1757–60) before entering public life. He represented

  • Dickinson, Jonathan (American minister)

    Jonathan Dickinson, prominent Presbyterian clergyman of the American colonial period and the first president of Princeton University. Joining the newly founded Presbyterian body in the Middle Colonies in 1717, he soon became a leader in theological thought and debate. When in 1721–29 its synod

  • Dickinson, Peter (British author)

    Peter Dickinson, (Peter Malcolm de Brissac Dickinson), British novelist (born Dec. 16, 1927, Livingstone, Northern Rhodesia [now Zambia]—died Dec. 16, 2015, Winchester, Hampshire, Eng.), moved easily between adult crime fiction and novels for children and young adults (usually mysteries tinged by

  • Dickinson, Peter Malcolm de Brissac (British author)

    Peter Dickinson, (Peter Malcolm de Brissac Dickinson), British novelist (born Dec. 16, 1927, Livingstone, Northern Rhodesia [now Zambia]—died Dec. 16, 2015, Winchester, Hampshire, Eng.), moved easily between adult crime fiction and novels for children and young adults (usually mysteries tinged by

  • dickite (mineral)

    Dickite, clay mineral, a form of kaolinite

  • Dickson Wright, Clarissa (British chef, cookbook author, and television personality)

    Clarissa Dickson Wright, (Clarissa Theresa Philomena Aileen Mary Josephine Agnes Elsie Trilby Louise Esmerelda Dickson Wright), British chef, cookbook author, and television personality (born June 24, 1947, London, Eng.—died March 15, 2014, Edinburgh, Scot.), gained international popularity as the

  • Dickson Wright, Clarissa Theresa Philomena Aileen Mary Josephine Agnes Elsie Trilby Louise Esmerelda (British chef, cookbook author, and television personality)

    Clarissa Dickson Wright, (Clarissa Theresa Philomena Aileen Mary Josephine Agnes Elsie Trilby Louise Esmerelda Dickson Wright), British chef, cookbook author, and television personality (born June 24, 1947, London, Eng.—died March 15, 2014, Edinburgh, Scot.), gained international popularity as the

  • Dickson, Amanda America (daughter of David Dickson)

    David Dickson: …$300,000) to his only child, Amanda America Dickson (1849–1893). Her mother, a slave belonging to his mother, had been raped at age 12 or 13 by David Dickson. Amanda Dickson’s white relatives contested the will, but she successfully defended her inheritance all the way to the state Supreme Court, which…

  • Dickson, Brian (Canadian jurist)

    Brian Dickson, Canadian jurist who was named to the Supreme Court of Canada in 1973 and served as chief justice from 1984 to 1990; he was a champion of individual rights and became an important interpreter of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms (b. May 25, 1916, Yorkton, Sask.--d. Oct. 17, 1998,

  • Dickson, Carr (American author)

    John Dickson Carr, U.S. writer of detective fiction whose work, both intellectual and macabre, is considered among the best in the genre. Carr’s first novel, It Walks by Night (1930), won favour that endured as Carr continued to create well-researched “locked-room” puzzles of historical England.

  • Dickson, Carr (American author)

    John Dickson Carr, U.S. writer of detective fiction whose work, both intellectual and macabre, is considered among the best in the genre. Carr’s first novel, It Walks by Night (1930), won favour that endured as Carr continued to create well-researched “locked-room” puzzles of historical England.

  • Dickson, Carter (American author)

    John Dickson Carr, U.S. writer of detective fiction whose work, both intellectual and macabre, is considered among the best in the genre. Carr’s first novel, It Walks by Night (1930), won favour that endured as Carr continued to create well-researched “locked-room” puzzles of historical England.

  • Dickson, David (American farmer and writer)

    David Dickson, American farmer and writer on agriculture. A prosperous and respected cotton farmer both before and after the American Civil War, he became known throughout his home state for his progressive farming methods and for his enlightened use of slave and (after Emancipation) tenant labour.

  • Dickson, Dorothy Schofield (British actress)

    Dorothy Schofield Dickson, U.S.-born British actress and dancer who was a phenomenal success on the London stage in a series of long-running musical comedies in the 1920s and ’30s (b. July 25, 1893--d. Sept. 25,

  • Dickson, Gordon Rupert (American author)

    Gordon Rupert Dickson, Canadian-born American science-fiction writer (born Nov. 1, 1923, Edmonton, Alta.—died Jan. 31, 2001, Minneapolis, Minn.), was one of the world’s most prominent science-fiction writers; he published more than 80 novels and some 200 short stories. Among Dickson’s best-known s

  • Dickson, Harry (fictional character)

    Jean Ray: …a magazine series whose hero, Harry Dickson, was known as the “American Sherlock Holmes.” He wrote this series pseudonymously or anonymously, because his reputation had been damaged and his work ignored. Resurfacing as Jean Ray, he produced his best work during and after World War II, starting a publishing company…

  • Dickson, Leonard Eugene (American mathematician)

    Leonard Eugene Dickson, American mathematician who made important contributions to the theory of numbers and the theory of groups. Appointed associate professor of mathematics at the University of Texas at Austin in 1899, Dickson joined the staff of the University of Chicago in 1900, where he

  • Dickson, Robert George Brian (Canadian jurist)

    Brian Dickson, Canadian jurist who was named to the Supreme Court of Canada in 1973 and served as chief justice from 1984 to 1990; he was a champion of individual rights and became an important interpreter of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms (b. May 25, 1916, Yorkton, Sask.--d. Oct. 17, 1998,

  • Dickson, William Kennedy Laurie (American inventor)

    Thomas Edison: The Edison laboratory: He assigned the project to William K.L. Dickson, an employee interested in photography, in 1888. After studying the work of various European photographers who also were trying to record motion, Edison and Dickson succeeded in constructing a working camera and a viewing instrument, which were called, respectively, the Kinetograph and…

  • Dicksonia (fern genus)

    fern: Annotated classification: …or girdle; 3 genera (Calochlaena, Dicksonia, and Lophosoria) with about 30 modern species, widely distributed in tropical regions but not occurring natively in Africa. Family Metaxyaceae Rhizomes not trunklike, short-creeping or ascending, somewhat flattened, hairy, at least near the tip, the relatively dense roots not forming a mantle; leaves 1–2…

  • Dicksoniaceae (plant family)

    Dicksoniaceae, the tree fern family, containing about 3 genera and some 30 species, in the division Pteridophyta (the lower vascular plants). The family has a long and diverse fossil record extending back to the Triassic Period (251 million to 199.6 million years ago). Members of Dicksoniaceae are

  • Dicle (river, Middle East)

    Tigris-Euphrates river system: The Tigris (Sumerian: Idigna; Akkadian: Idiklat; biblical: Hiddekel; Arabic: Dijlah; Turkish: Dicle) is about 1,180 miles (1,900 km) in length.

Your preference has been recorded
Get a Premium membership for 30% off!
Save 30% with our Memorial Day Sale!
港台一级毛片免费观看