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  • diabetic kidney disease (medical disorder)

    Diabetic nephropathy, deterioration of kidney function occurring as a complication of diabetes mellitus. The condition is characterized primarily by increased urinary excretion of the protein albumin, increased blood pressure, and reduced glomerular filtration rate (the average rate at which wastes

  • diabetic nephropathy (medical disorder)

    Diabetic nephropathy, deterioration of kidney function occurring as a complication of diabetes mellitus. The condition is characterized primarily by increased urinary excretion of the protein albumin, increased blood pressure, and reduced glomerular filtration rate (the average rate at which wastes

  • Diable au corps, Le (work by Autant-Lara)

    Claude Autant-Lara: …Le Diable au corps (1947; Devil in the Flesh).

  • Diable au corps, Le (work by Radiguet)

    Raymond Radiguet: …Le Diable au corps (1923; The Devil in the Flesh), which remains a unique expression of the poetry and perversity of an adolescent boy’s love.

  • Diable boiteux, Le (ballet)

    Fanny Elssler: Her sensational success in Le Diable boiteux (1836), in which she introduced the Spanish cachucha, challenged Taglioni’s supremacy. To unseat her rival, still called the greatest classical ballerina, she made one attempt in Taglioni’s favourite ballet, La Sylphide; the endeavour was most unsuccessful, since she lacked Taglioni’s lightness and…

  • Diable, ?le du (island, Atlantic Ocean)

    Devils Island, rocky islet off the Atlantic coast of French Guiana. The smallest of the three ?les du Salut, about 10 miles (16 km) from the mainland and the Kourou River mouth, it is a narrow strip of land about 3,900 feet (1,200 m) long and 1,320 feet (400 m) broad, mostly covered by palm t

  • Diable, Robert le (legendary character)

    Robert The Devil, legendary son of a duke of Normandy, born in answer to prayers addressed to the devil. He uses his immense strength only for crime. Directed by the pope to consult a certain holy hermit, he is delivered from his curse by maintaining absolute silence, feigning madness, taking his f

  • Diable-Marin, Le (submarine)

    Sebastian Wilhelm Valentin Bauer: …built the 52-foot iron submarine Le Diable-Marin (“The Marine Devil”), carrying a crew of 11, 4 of whom worked a treadmill that drove a screw propeller. Through windows in this submarine Bauer made what were probably the first underwater photographs. He also experimented with underwater sound for signaling and with…

  • diablerie (literature)

    Diablerie, a representation in words or pictures of black magic or of dealings with the devil. Among the literary works that contain such representations are Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown” and Sylvia Townsend Warner’s Lolly Willowes. The word is French and means “devilry,”

  • Diablo (electronic game)

    Diablo, groundbreaking fantasy role-playing electronic game released in 1997 by the American company Blizzard Entertainment (now Activision Blizzard). Set in and under the fictional city of Tristam, Diablo sent players on a journey through a series of dungeons to eventually do battle with Diablo,

  • diablo (game)

    top: …game known for centuries as Ko-en-gen was introduced in Europe as diablo and became the rage. A spool (“devil”) was whipped up by a cord, tossed up by the player, and caught again on the cord. The hexagonal teetotum (known to the ancient Greeks and Romans), marked distinctively on each…

  • diablo cojuelo, El (work by Vélez de Guevara)

    Luis Vélez de Guevara: His fantastic satirical novel, El diablo cojuelo (1641; “The Crippled Devil”), became well-known from its adaptation by the French dramatist Alain Lesage as Le Diable boiteux (1707; The Devil upon Two Sticks).

  • Diablo Range (mountains, United States)

    Diablo Range, segment of the Pacific Coast Ranges (see Pacific mountain system) in west-central California, U.S. It extends southeastward for about 180 miles (290 km) from the solitary 3,849-foot (1,173-metre) Mount Diablo within Mount Diablo State Park (Contra Costa county), about 20 miles (30 km)

  • Diablotin (game)

    Fifteen Puzzle, puzzle consisting of 15 squares, numbered 1 through 15, which can be slid horizontally or vertically within a four-by-four grid that has one empty space among its 16 locations. The object of the puzzle is to arrange the squares in numerical sequence using only the extra space in the

  • diablotin (bird)

    procellariiform: Importance to humans: The related black-capped petrel, or diablotin (P. hasitata), of the West Indies was also thought extinct (because of predation by humans, rats, and mongooses) until in 1961 a substantial population, estimated to number at least 4,000 birds, was found breeding in the inaccessible forested cliffs of Hispaniola.

  • Diabolique (film by Clouzot [1955])

    Les Diaboliques, (French: “The Devilish Ones”) French suspense film, released in 1955, that is considered a classic of the genre. It was based on the novel Celle qui n’était plus (1952; “She Who Was No More”) by Pierre Boileau and Thomas Narcejac. The film is set in a decrepit French school for

  • Diaboliques, Les (work by Barbey d’Aurevilly)

    Jules-Amédée Barbey d'Aurevilly: Les Diaboliques (1874; Weird Women), a collection of six short stories, is often considered his masterpiece.

  • Diaboliques, Les (film by Clouzot [1955])

    Les Diaboliques, (French: “The Devilish Ones”) French suspense film, released in 1955, that is considered a classic of the genre. It was based on the novel Celle qui n’était plus (1952; “She Who Was No More”) by Pierre Boileau and Thomas Narcejac. The film is set in a decrepit French school for

  • Diabrotica (insect, Diabrotica genus)

    Cucumber beetle, any of several important pests of the genus Diabrotica belonging to the subfamily Galerucinae of the leaf beetle family Chrysomelidae (order Coleoptera). They are greenish yellow in colour, between 2.5 and 11 mm (up to 0.5 inch) long, and marked with black spots or stripes. The

  • Diabrotica undecimpunctata (insect)

    cucumber beetle: …wing cover (elytron), and the spotted cucumber beetle (D. undecimpunctata) has black spots on each wing cover. They both feed on garden plants, and their larvae feed on the roots. The green-coloured D. longicornis eats corn pollen and silk; the root-feeding larvae are known as corn rootworms.

  • diacetyl peroxide (chemical compound)

    radical: Unstable radicals: Diacetyl peroxide, for example,

  • diacetylmorphine (drug)

    Heroin, highly addictive morphine derivative that makes up a large portion of the illicit traffic in narcotics. Heroin is made by treating morphine with acetic anhydride; the resulting substance is four to eight times as potent as morphine. (Morphine is an alkaloid found in opium, which is the

  • diachronic linguistics

    Historical linguistics, the branch of linguistics concerned with the study of phonological, grammatical, and semantic changes, the reconstruction of earlier stages of languages, and the discovery and application of the methods by which genetic relationships among languages can be demonstrated. H

  • diachronic phonology (linguistics)

    phonology: Diachronic (historical) phonology examines and constructs theories about the changes and modifications in speech sounds and sound systems over a period of time. For example, it is concerned with the process by which the English words “sea” and “see,” once pronounced with different vowel sounds…

  • diaconate (Christian ministry)

    Deacon, (from Greek diakonos, “helper”), a member of the lowest rank of the threefold Christian ministry (below the presbyter-priest and bishop) or, in various Protestant churches, a lay official, usually ordained, who shares in the ministry and sometimes in the governance of a congregation. In

  • diaconicon (architecture)

    sacristy: …rooms beside the apse, the diaconicon and the prothesis, were used for these purposes.

  • diacritic (linguistics)

    alphabet: Arabic alphabet: …the Qur?ān, the use of diacritical marks (including signs for short vowels, which are sometimes used in conjunction with the letters alif, wāw, and yā?) was introduced in Basra in the early 8th century. The practice was probably borrowed from the Syriac script. It not only provides vowel sounds but…

  • diacylglycerol (chemical compound)

    fat: Chemical composition of fats: Monoglycerides and diglycerides are partial esters of glycerol and have one or two fatty-acid radicals, respectively. They are seldom found in natural fats except as the products of partial hydrolysis of triglycerides. They are easily prepared synthetically, however, and have important applications mainly because of their ability…

  • Diadectes (fossil animal genus)

    Diadectes, extinct genus of tetrapods closely related to the first amniotes (mammals, birds, reptiles, and their relatives). Members of this genus have been found as fossils in Carboniferous and Lower Permian rocks in North America (360 million to 270 million years ago). Diadectes shares a mixture

  • diadem (ornament)

    jewelry: Greek: …high consideration are the magnificent diadems that came into wide use as a result of the Persian conquests made by Alexander the Great. One type is a rigid elliptical shape with a Hercules knot in the centre and pendants hanging down over the forehead. The Hercules knot was the most…

  • Diadema antillarum (echinoderm)

    sea urchin: …setosum of the Indo-Pacific, and D. antillarum of Florida and the West Indies, have toxic spines up to 30 centimetres (12 inches) long. The slate-pencil urchin (Heterocentrotus mammillatus) of the Indo-Pacific has 12-cm spines that may be 1 cm thick—stout enough to be used for writing. Lytechinus variegatus, a pale-greenish…

  • Diadema setosum (echinoderm)

    sea urchin: …the Mediterranean and eastern Atlantic, Diadema (formerly Centrechinus) setosum of the Indo-Pacific, and D. antillarum of Florida and the West Indies, have toxic spines up to 30 centimetres (12 inches) long. The slate-pencil urchin (Heterocentrotus mammillatus) of the Indo-Pacific has 12-cm spines that may be 1 cm thick—stout enough to…

  • diademed sifaka (primate)

    sifaka: The larger diademed sifaka (P. diadema), silky sifaka (P. candidus), and Milne-Edwards’s sifaka (P. edwardsi) live in the rainforests of eastern Madagascar. Milne-Edwards’s sifaka is black or brown, generally with a white patch on the back and flanks, whereas the diademed sifaka, or simpoon, has a beautiful…

  • Diadochi (Greek history)

    coin: From Alexander the Great to the end of the Roman Republic, c. 336–31 bc: …death in 323 bc the Diadochi (“Successors”—a reference to the chief officers who partitioned his empire) were to reflect the importance of his coinage in their own differentiated issues—Seleucus in Syria, Philip Arrhidaeus in Macedonia, Lysimachus in Thrace, and Ptolemy in Egypt, where, except for tentative gold coined by Tachos…

  • Diadochoi (Greek history)

    coin: From Alexander the Great to the end of the Roman Republic, c. 336–31 bc: …death in 323 bc the Diadochi (“Successors”—a reference to the chief officers who partitioned his empire) were to reflect the importance of his coinage in their own differentiated issues—Seleucus in Syria, Philip Arrhidaeus in Macedonia, Lysimachus in Thrace, and Ptolemy in Egypt, where, except for tentative gold coined by Tachos…

  • Diadochus of Photice (theologian)

    Diadochus Of Photice, theologian, mystic, and bishop of Photice, Epirus, who was a staunch defender of orthodox Christological doctrine. His treatises on the ascetic life have influenced Eastern Orthodox and Western spirituality. Little is known of Diadochus’ life. At the Council of Chalcedon (451)

  • diadochy (crystallography)

    Diadochy, capability of an atom or ion (charged atom) to replace another in a particular crystal lattice. The replaceability may be complete or partial; the degree of substitution depends on the temperature of equilibration, the availability of substituting ion, and its radius, charge, and

  • Diadophis punctatus (reptile)

    Ring-necked snake, (Diadophis punctatus), small terrestrial snake (family Colubridae), found widely in North America, that sports a ring or collar of contrasting colour around its neck or nape. The ring is most frequently white to yellow on an otherwise uniform background of brown, gray, or black.

  • Diaemus youngi (mammal)

    vampire bat: … (Desmodus rotundus), together with the white-winged vampire bat (Diaemus, or Desmodus, youngi) and the hairy-legged vampire bat (Diphylla ecaudata) are the only sanguivorous (blood-eating) bats. The common vampire bat thrives in agricultural areas and feeds on livestock such as cattle, pigs, and chickens. The other two vampires are primarily restricted…

  • diaeresis (prosody)

    Diaeresis, (from Greek diairein, “to divide”), the resolution of one syllable into two, especially by separating the vowel elements of a diphthong and, by extension, two adjacent vowels. It is also the mark placed over a vowel to indicate that it is pronounced as a separate syllable. (For example,

  • diagenesis (geology)

    Diagenesis, sum of all processes, chiefly chemical, by which changes in a sediment are brought about after its deposition but before its final lithification (conversion to rock). Because most sediments contain mineral mixtures in which not all the minerals are in chemical equilibrium with each

  • Diaghilev, Serge (Russian ballet impresario)

    Serge Diaghilev, Russian promoter of the arts who revitalized ballet by integrating the ideals of other art forms—music, painting, and drama—with those of the dance. From 1906 he lived in Paris, where in 1909 he founded the Ballets Russes. Thereafter he toured Europe and the Americas with his

  • Diagne, Ahmadou Mapaté (Senagalese author)

    African literature: French: …of Malic”), the Senegalese writer Ahmadou Mapaté Diagne anticipates such later writers as Sheikh Hamidou Kane, also of Senegal. In Diagne’s novel, Malic, a Wolof boy, is embroiled in a struggle between Muslim tradition and the influence of the West. He goes to a French-run school to study; then, instead…

  • Diagne, Blaise (French government official)

    Senegal: The French period: …African electors succeeded in sending Blaise Diagne, an African former colonial official, as their deputy to the National Assembly in Paris. In return for assistance in recruiting African soldiers in World War I (some 200,000 in all from French West Africa), Diagne obtained confirmation of full French citizenship rights for…

  • diagnosis (medicine)

    Diagnosis, the process of determining the nature of a disease or disorder and distinguishing it from other possible conditions. The term comes from the Greek gnosis, meaning knowledge. The diagnostic process is the method by which health professionals select one disease over another, identifying

  • Diagnosis Murder (American television series)

    Fred Silverman: …of the Night (1988–95), and Diagnosis Murder (1993–2001). He also produced a series of Perry Mason television movies (1985–94).

  • Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (publication)

    Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), publication of the American Psychiatric Association detailing diagnostic criteria for hundreds of psychiatric disorders. The manual is the standard resource of the mental health industry in the United States and is widely used by mental

  • diagnostic horizon (pedology)

    horizon: …concept is that of subsurface diagnostic horizons. These are characterized by the type of accumulated weathering products that they contain (e.g., clay, mixtures of iron oxides and humus, or soluble salts) or by the possible presence of a hard, impermeable layer (e.g., an indurated calcium carbonate or iron-rich layer).

  • diagnostic imaging (medicine)

    Diagnostic imaging, the use of electromagnetic radiation and certain other technologies to produce images of internal structures of the body for the purpose of accurate diagnosis. Diagnostic imaging is roughly equivalent to radiology, the branch of medicine that uses radiation to diagnose and treat

  • diagnostic radiology

    radiology: Diagnosis: X-rays were discovered by Wilhelm Conrad R?ntgen, a German professor of physics, in his laboratory in the University of Würzburg on Nov. 8, 1895. Early on, in radiodiagnosis, use was made of three of the properties of X-rays—their ability to penetrate the tissues, their…

  • diagonal (punctuation)

    punctuation: Punctuation in Greek and Latin to 1600: …elevatus are joined by the virgule (/) as an alternative form of light stop. Vernacular literature followed the less formal types of Latin literature; and the printers, as usual, followed the scribes. The first printed texts of the Bible and the liturgy are, as a rule, carefully punctuated on the…

  • diagonal buttress (architecture)

    buttress: …various types of corner buttresses—diagonal, angle, clasping, and setback—that support intersecting walls.

  • diagonal cutting pliers (tool)

    pliers: Diagonal cutting pliers are used for cutting wire and small pins in areas that cannot be reached by larger cutting tools. Because the cutting edges are diagonally offset about 15 degrees, these can cut objects flush with a surface.

  • diagonal generator (device)

    magnetohydrodynamic power generator: Principles of operation: …of these electrodes in this diagonal generator permits a single electric load to be used.

  • diagonal stitch (needlepoint)

    needlepoint: In the 20th century the basket weave, or diagonal, stitch has achieved widespread popularity. It produces a firmer fabric but also uses more yarn than the tent stitch.

  • Diagonale du fou, La (film by Dembo [1984])
  • diagonalization argument (mathematics)

    Cantor's theorem: …a version of his so-called diagonalization argument, which he had earlier used to prove that the cardinality of the rational numbers is the same as the cardinality of the integers by putting them into a one-to-one correspondence. The notion that, in the case of infinite sets, the size of a…

  • Diaguita (people)

    Diaguita, Indian peoples of South America, formerly inhabiting northwestern Argentina and the Chilean provinces of Atacama and Coquimbo. The Calchaquí, a northwestern Argentine subgroup of the Diaguita, are the best-documented. Their language affiliation remains uncertain. The Calchaquí were

  • Diahot River (river, New Caledonia)

    New Caledonia: Relief and drainage: The Diahot River, the longest river in the country, flows for about 60 miles (100 km) toward the northern tip of the island along the western escarpment of the Mount Panié range.

  • diaitetes (Greek law)

    Greek law: …to a public arbitrator (diaitētēs). If one of them refused to accept the award or if the matter was not subject to compulsory arbitration, the case was referred to a dicastery presided over by the magistrate. The dicasts, after listening to the arguments and evidence submitted by the parties,…

  • Diakonoff, Igor (Russian linguist)

    Afro-Asiatic languages: Origins: …in the former Soviet Union, Igor Diakonoff, theorized that it arose in what is now the Sahara, from where several subsequent migrations took place after about 5000 bce, including the exit from Africa by speakers of what would become the Semitic languages. Diakonoff accounted for the considerable linguistic diversity of…

  • dial indicator (measurement device)

    gauge: They include dial indicators, in which movement of a gauging spindle deflects a pointer on a graduated dial; wiggler indicators, which are used by machinists to centre or align work in machine tools; comparators, or visual gauges; and air gauges, which are used to gauge holes of…

  • Dial M for Murder (film by Hitchcock [1954])

    Dial M for Murder, American thriller film, released in 1954, that was directed by Alfred Hitchcock and shot in 3-D. Dial M for Murder, which was based on a play of the same name by Frederick Knott, centres on a murder plan gone wrong. Ray Milland portrayed the retired professional tennis player

  • Dial, The (American literary magazine)

    Kenneth Burke: …was the music critic of The Dial (1927–29) and of The Nation (1934–36). He then turned to literary criticism, lecturing on this subject at the University of Chicago (1938; 1949–50), and he taught at Bennington College (Vermont) from 1943 through 1961.

  • Dial, Thornton (American artist)

    Thornton Dial, American artist (born Sept. 10, 1928, Emelle, Ala.—died Jan. 25, 2016, McCalla, Ala.), created powerfully evocative assemblages, sculptures, collages, paintings, and drawings that reflected his personal history and events in the world. Dial had little formal schooling and did farm

  • dialect (linguistics)

    Dialect, a variety of a language that signals where a person comes from. The notion is usually interpreted geographically (regional dialect), but it also has some application in relation to a person’s social background (class dialect) or occupation (occupational dialect). The word dialect comes

  • dialect atlas

    linguistics: Dialect atlases: Dialect atlases are compiled on the basis of investigations of the dialects of a large number of places; a questionnaire provides uniform data. There are two basic methods of data collection: fieldwork and survey by correspondence. Fieldwork, in which a trained investigator transcribes…

  • dialect map

    linguistics: Dialect atlases: Dialect atlases are compiled on the basis of investigations of the dialects of a large number of places; a questionnaire provides uniform data. There are two basic methods of data collection: fieldwork and survey by correspondence. Fieldwork, in which a trained investigator transcribes…

  • dialect poetry (literature)

    Italian literature: Dialect poetry: A remarkable aspect of 20th-century poetry composed in Italy was the proliferation of cultivated poets who rejected what they saw as the pollution, inauthenticity, and debased currency of the national language. They chose to express an up-to-the-minute nonfolkloristic content, not in supraregional standard…

  • Dialectic (Kantianism)

    Western philosophy: Literary forms: …right functioning, (2) a “dialectic,” or logic of error, showing the pitfalls into which a careless reason falls, and (3) a “methodology,” an arrangement of rules for practice. It is a form that was unique to Kant, but it raised certain problems of “oppositional” thinking, to which 19th-century philosophers…

  • dialectic (logic)

    Dialectic, originally a form of logical argumentation but now a philosophical concept of evolution applied to diverse fields including thought, nature, and history. Among the classical Greek thinkers, the meanings of dialectic ranged from a technique of refutation in debate, through a method for

  • Dialectic of Enlightenment (work by Adorno and Horkheimer)

    political philosophy: Horkheimer, Adorno, and Marcuse: In Dialectic of Enlightenment (1947), Horkheimer and Adorno argued that the celebration of reason by thinkers of the 18th-century Enlightenment had led to the development of technologically sophisticated but oppressive and inhumane modes of governance, exemplified in the 20th century by fascism and totalitarianism. In works…

  • Dialectic of Sex, The (work by Firestone)

    feminism: Dissension and debate: …New York Radical Feminists, published The Dialectic of Sex in the same year, insisting that love disadvantaged women by creating intimate shackles between them and the men they loved—men who were also their oppressors. One year later, Germaine Greer, an Australian living in London, published The Female Eunuch, in which…

  • Dialectic of Sex: The Case for a Feminist Revolution, The (work by Firestone)

    feminism: Dissension and debate: …New York Radical Feminists, published The Dialectic of Sex in the same year, insisting that love disadvantaged women by creating intimate shackles between them and the men they loved—men who were also their oppressors. One year later, Germaine Greer, an Australian living in London, published The Female Eunuch, in which…

  • Dialectica (work by Saint Anselm)

    history of logic: St. Anselm and Peter Abelard: …together with the independent treatise Dialectica (extant in part). These works show a familiarity with Boethius but go far beyond him. Among the topics discussed insightfully by Abelard are the role of the copula in categorical propositions, the effects of different positions of the negation sign in categorical propositions, modal…

  • Dialecticae disputationes (work by Valla)

    Lorenzo Valla: …God’s foreknowledge; and in his Dialecticae disputationes (“Dialectical Disputations”), Valla reduced Aristotle’s nine “categories” to three (substance, quality, and action, which corresponded to noun, adjective, and verb) and denounced as barbarisms a number of the technical terms of scholastic philosophy, such as “entity” and “quiddity.” Valla preferred the language of…

  • Dialecticae libri duo (work by Ramus)

    history of logic: The 16th century: …this work and in his Dialecticae libri duo (“Two Books of Dialectics”) of 1556 he combined attacks on scholastic logic, an emphasis on the use of logic in actual arguments (“dialectics”), and a presentation of a much simplified approach to categorical syllogism (without an attempt to follow Aristotle). Elsewhere, he…

  • dialectical dualism (religion)

    dualism: Nature and significance: Dialectical dualism involves an eternal dialectic, or tension, of two opposed principles, such as, in Western culture, the One and the many, or Idea and matter (or space, called by Plato “the receptacle”), and, in Indian culture, maya (the illusory world of sense experience and…

  • dialectical materialism (philosophy)

    Dialectical materialism, a philosophical approach to reality derived from the teachings of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. For Marx and Engels, materialism meant that the material world, perceptible to the senses, has objective reality independent of mind or spirit. They did not deny the reality

  • dialectical method (literature)

    nonfictional prose: Dialogues: By playing this dialectical game he can appear to present contrary views as their respective proponents might and then expose the errors of those he opposes, leading the readers to accept his own conclusions. The advantages of the dialogue are clear: ideas that might have remained abstruse and…

  • dialectical theology (Protestant theological movement)

    Neoorthodoxy, influential 20th-century Protestant theological movement in Europe and America, known in Europe as crisis theology and dialectical theology. The phrase crisis theology referred to the intellectual crisis of Christendom that occurred when the carnage of World War I belied the exuberant

  • Dialectician (Chinese philosophy)

    Logician, any member of a school of Chinese philosophers of the Warring States period (475–221 bce). In Chinese the school is called Mingjia (Wade-Giles romanization Ming-chia), the “School of Names,” because one of the problems addressed by the Logicians was the correspondence between name and

  • dialectics (logic)

    Dialectic, originally a form of logical argumentation but now a philosophical concept of evolution applied to diverse fields including thought, nature, and history. Among the classical Greek thinkers, the meanings of dialectic ranged from a technique of refutation in debate, through a method for

  • Dialectics of Nature (work by Engels)

    Marxism: The contributions of Engels: …work, Dialektik und Natur (Dialectics of Nature), which he had begun around 1875–76. The importance of these writings to the subsequent development of Marxism can be seen from Lenin’s observation that Engels “developed, in a clear and often polemical style, the most general scientific questions and the different phenomena…

  • Dialectique (work by Ramus)

    history of logic: The 16th century: His Dialectique (Dialectics) of 1555 (translated into English in 1574) was the first major logical work in a modern language. In this work and in his Dialecticae libri duo (“Two Books of Dialectics”) of 1556 he combined attacks on scholastic logic, an emphasis on the use…

  • Dialectique peut-elle casser des briques?, La (film by Edwards [1973])

    Situationist International: …peut-elle casser des briques? (1973; Can Dialectics Break Bricks?) serves as a prime example of détournement in action. Viénet took an already existing Hong Kong martial arts film and replaced its dialogue, changing the meaning of the original story into a newly “detourned” film about the politicized proletariat training to…

  • dialectology (linguistics)

    Dialectology, the study of dialects. Variation most commonly occurs as a result of relative geographic or social isolation and may affect vocabulary, grammar, or pronunciation (accent). Dialectology as a discipline began in the 19th century with the development in western Europe of dictionaries and

  • Dialektik der Aufkl?rung (work by Adorno and Horkheimer)

    political philosophy: Horkheimer, Adorno, and Marcuse: In Dialectic of Enlightenment (1947), Horkheimer and Adorno argued that the celebration of reason by thinkers of the 18th-century Enlightenment had led to the development of technologically sophisticated but oppressive and inhumane modes of governance, exemplified in the 20th century by fascism and totalitarianism. In works…

  • Dialektik und Natur (work by Engels)

    Marxism: The contributions of Engels: …work, Dialektik und Natur (Dialectics of Nature), which he had begun around 1875–76. The importance of these writings to the subsequent development of Marxism can be seen from Lenin’s observation that Engels “developed, in a clear and often polemical style, the most general scientific questions and the different phenomena…

  • dialer (electronics)

    telephone: Dialer: The dialer is used to enter the number of the party that the user wishes to call. Signals generated by the dialer activate switches in the local office, which establish a transmission path to the called party. Dialers are of the rotary and push-button…

  • Dialeurodes citri (insect)

    whitefly: The citrus whitefly (Dialeurodes citri) is economically important, sucking sap from orange and date trees and producing honeydew, a sweet by-product of digestion, upon which grows a sooty fungus that ruins the fruit. Control is by oil or parathion sprays.

  • Dialictus zephyrus (bee)

    bee: …the best-known of which is Dialictus zephyrus, one of many so-called sweat bees, which are attracted to perspiration; Oxaeidae, large, fast-flying bees that bear some anatomical resemblance to Andrenidae; Melittidae, bees that mark a transitional form between the lower and the higher bees; Megachilidae (leaf-cutting and mason bees), noted for…

  • dialkyl sulfite (chemical compound)

    organosulfur compound: Other sulfinyl and sulfonyl compounds: …of sulfurous acid known as dialkyl sulfites—dimethyl sulfite, MeOS(O)OMe, for example—can be made from alcohols and thionyl chloride: 2MeOH + Cl2S=O → MeOS(=O)OMe. Cyclic sulfite esters, made in a similar manner from 1,2-diols (1,2-dialcohols), and their oxidation products, cyclic sulfate esters, find considerable use in organic synthesis.

  • dialkyloxysulfurane (chemical compound)

    organosulfur compound: Sulfuranes: hypervalent organosulfur compounds: …from moisture, acyclic and cyclic dialkyloxysulfuranes of type R2(R′O)2S are stable at room temperature and find utility as reagents in organic synthesis.

  • Diall of Princes, The (work by Guevara)

    Antonio de Guevara: by Lord Berners, The Golden Boke of Marcus Aurelius, 1535, and by Sir Thomas North, The Diall of Princes, 1557, frequently reprinted through the 20th century), an attempt to invent a model for rulers, became one of the most influential books of the 16th century. Well received outside…

  • diallage (mineral)

    Diallage, either of the two pyroxenes augite and diopside, which have well-developed, close-spaced, parallel partings commonly filled with magnetite or ilmenite. These filled partings are generally more pronounced than cleavage planes. Diallage is commonly dark green or bronze-coloured and often

  • Diallo, Cellou Dalein (Guinean politician)

    Guinea: Independence: The two front-runners—former prime minister Cellou Dalein Diallo of the Union of Democratic Forces of Guinea (Union des Forces Démocratiques de Guinée; UFDG), who received 44 percent of the vote, and veteran opposition leader Alpha Condé of the Rally of the Guinean People (Rassemblement du Peuple Guinéen; RPG), who received…

  • diallyl disulfide (chemical compound)

    garlic: …principal components of which are diallyl disulfide, diallyl trisulfide, and allyl propyl disulfide.

  • diallyl trisulfide (chemical compound)

    garlic: …of which are diallyl disulfide, diallyl trisulfide, and allyl propyl disulfide.

  • Dialoghi con Leuco (work by Pavese)

    Cesare Pavese: …is Dialoghi con Leucò (1947; Dialogues with Leucò, 1965), poetically written conversations about the human condition. The novel considered his best, La luna e i falò (1950; The Moon and the Bonfires, 1950), is a bleak, yet compassionate story of a hero who tries to find himself by visiting the…

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