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  • Déjà Dead (novel by Reichs)

    Kathy Reichs: …receive the completed manuscript for Déjà Dead (1997), signed Reichs to a $1.2 million two-book deal. Déjà Dead won the Arthur Ellis Award for best first novel. Other novels in the series included Death du Jour (1999), Bare Bones (2003), Devil Bones (2008), Bones of the Lost (2013), and Speaking…

  • Déjà vu (album by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young)

    Neil Young: Harvest, Rust Never Sleeps, and Harvest Moon: …acoustic music—a move forecast by Déjà Vu’s “Helpless,” which depicted him as totally vulnerable, trying to bare his emotional world musically. His confessional singer-songwriter mode became a key part of his multifaceted persona. On his next solo album, After the Gold Rush (1970), Young underlined his stance as a rock-and-roll…

  • déjà vu (psychology)

    memory abnormality: Déjà vu: The déjà vu experience has aroused considerable interest and is occasionally felt by most people, especially in youth or when they are fatigued. It has also found its way into literature, having been well described by, among other creative writers, Shelley, Dickens, Hawthorne,…

  • Déjàvu (play by Osborne)

    John Osborne: Osborne’s last play, Déjàvu (1992), a sequel to Look Back in Anger, revisits Jimmy Porter after a 35-year interval.

  • Déjazet, Virginie (French actress)

    Victorien Sardou: …he owed to the actress Virginie Déjazet, and several of his 70 works were written for her; others were written for Sarah Bernhardt. In 1877 he was elected to the Académie Fran?aise.

  • dejection (astrology)

    astrology: Astrology in the Hellenistic period (3rd century bc to 3rd century ad): …which are their degrees of dejection (low influence). Various arcs of the zodiac, then, are either primarily or secondarily subject to each planet, whose strength and influence in a geniture (nativity) depend partially on its position relative to these arcs and to those of its friends and enemies.

  • Dejection: An Ode (poem by Coleridge)

    Dejection: An Ode, autobiographical poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, published in 1802 in the Morning Post, a London daily newspaper. When he wrote this poem, Coleridge was addicted to opium, was unhappy in his marriage, and had fallen in love with Sara Hutchinson. Intended originally as a letter

  • Déjeuner en fourrure, Le (work by Oppenheim)

    Meret Oppenheim: The result, Object, was part of the first Surrealist exhibition held at New York’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), “Fantastic Art, Dada, Surrealism,” curated by Alfred H. Barr, Jr., in 1936, and it became an overnight art world sensation. MoMA then acquired Object, the museum’s first acquisition…

  • Déjeuner sur l’herbe, Le (painting by Manet)

    édouard Manet: Mature life and works: …of the Salon rejected his Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe, a work whose technique was entirely revolutionary, and so Manet instead exhibited it at the Salon des Refusés (established to exhibit the many works rejected by the official Salon). Although inspired by works of the Old Masters—Giorgione’s Pastoral Concert (c. 1510)…

  • Dějiny národu ?eského (work by Palacky)

    Franti?ek Palacky: (1836–67), and Dějiny národu ?eského (1848–76), the work lucidly presents Palacky’s conception of the nature of Czech history as “the constant contact and conflict between the Slavs on the one hand and Rome and the Germans on the other.” Thus the Hussite period became the central episode…

  • Dekabrist (Russian history)

    Decembrist, any of the Russian revolutionaries who led an unsuccessful uprising on Dec. 14 (Dec. 26, New Style), 1825, and through their martyrdom provided a source of inspiration to succeeding generations of Russian dissidents. The Decembrists were primarily members of the upper classes who had m

  • Dekabrists’ Square (square, Saint Petersburg, Russia)

    Nicholas I: Ascent to the throne: …in military formation to the Senate Square—now the Decembrist Square—in the heart of the capital. Although the rebellion had failed by nightfall, it meant that Nicholas I ascended the throne over the bodies of some of his subjects and in actual combat with the dreaded revolution.

  • DeKalb (Illinois, United States)

    DeKalb, city, DeKalb county, north-central Illinois, U.S. It lies on the south branch of the Kishwaukee River, about 60 miles (100 km) west of Chicago. Founded in 1837, it was called Buena Vista and then Huntley’s Grove (for city founder Russell Huntley of New York) until the 1850s, when it was

  • Dekalog (Polish television series)

    Krzysztof Kie?lowski: Kie?lowski’s mammoth Dekalog (1988–89; Decalogue), cowritten with Piesiewicz, is a series inspired by the Ten Commandments and made for Polish television. Each of the 10 hour-long episodes explores at least one commandment; as the commandments are not explicitly named, the audience is invited to identify the moral…

  • Dekanawida (Iroquois leader)

    Iroquois Confederacy: …between 1570 and 1600, to Dekanawidah (the Peacemaker), born a Huron, who is said to have persuaded Hiawatha, an Onondaga living among Mohawks, to advance “peace, civil authority, righteousness, and the great law” as sanctions for confederation. Cemented mainly by their desire to stand together against invasion, the tribes united…

  • Dekanawidah (Iroquois leader)

    Iroquois Confederacy: …between 1570 and 1600, to Dekanawidah (the Peacemaker), born a Huron, who is said to have persuaded Hiawatha, an Onondaga living among Mohawks, to advance “peace, civil authority, righteousness, and the great law” as sanctions for confederation. Cemented mainly by their desire to stand together against invasion, the tribes united…

  • Deke (Congolese-American basketball player)

    Dikembe Mutombo, Congolese-American basketball player who was one of the best defenders in National Basketball Association (NBA) history and was also noted for his philanthropic efforts. The son of a father who worked as a school principal and then in Congo’s department of education, Mutombo grew

  • Dekéleia (British military enclave, Cyprus)

    Dhekélia, British military enclave in southeast Cyprus, retained as a “sovereignty base area” by the United Kingdom under the 1959 London Agreement granting independence to Cyprus. It is located northeast of Larnaca on the northern shore of Larnaca Bay, and its northern boundary formed part of the

  • Deken, Aagje (Dutch author)

    Aagje Deken, writer and collaborator with Betje Wolff (q.v.) on the first Dutch novel, De historie van mejuffrouw Sara Burgerhart, 2 vol. (1782; “The History of Miss Sara Burgerhart”). Deken had written a little-known volume of devotional poetry by the time she met Betje Wolff in 1776. The next

  • Deken, Agatha (Dutch author)

    Aagje Deken, writer and collaborator with Betje Wolff (q.v.) on the first Dutch novel, De historie van mejuffrouw Sara Burgerhart, 2 vol. (1782; “The History of Miss Sara Burgerhart”). Deken had written a little-known volume of devotional poetry by the time she met Betje Wolff in 1776. The next

  • Dekker, Desmond (Jamaican singer-songwriter)

    Desmond Dekker, (Desmond Adolphus Dacres), Jamaican singer-songwriter (born July 16, 1941, Kingston, Jam.—died May 25, 2006, Thornton Heath, Eng.), was the first Jamaican to become an international pop music star, with hits in three genres: ska, rock steady, and reggae. He was working as a welder i

  • Dekker, Eduard Douwes (Dutch author)

    Multatuli, one of the Netherlands’ greatest writers, whose radical ideas and freshness of style eclipsed the mediocre, self-satisfied Dutch literature of the mid-19th century. In 1838 Multatuli went to the Dutch East Indies, where he held a number of government posts until 1856, when he resigned

  • Dekker, Thomas (English dramatist)

    Thomas Dekker, English dramatist and writer of prose pamphlets who is particularly known for his lively depictions of London life. Few facts of Dekker’s life are certain. He may have been born into a family of Dutch immigrants living in London and is first mentioned as a playwright in 1598. He

  • DeKnight, Jimmy (American songwriter)

    James Myers, (Jimmy DeKnight), American songwriter (born Oct. 26, 1919, Philadelphia, Pa.—died May 9, 2001, Fort Myers, Fla.), co-wrote, with Max Freedman, the legendary rock-and-roll song “Rock Around the Clock,” which became a chart-topping hit in 1955 after Bill Haley and His Comets recorded i

  • del (mathematics)

    Differential operator, In mathematics, any combination of derivatives applied to a function. It takes the form of a polynomial of derivatives, such as D2xx ? D2xy · D2yx, where D2 is a second derivative and the subscripts indicate partial derivatives. Special differential operators include the

  • Del abaco (work by Piero della Francesca)

    Piero della Francesca: Last years: Del abaco (“On the Abacus”) is a pamphlet on applied mathematics.

  • Del arte de la pintura (treatise by Pacheco)

    Pablo de Céspedes: …Francisco Pacheco in his treatise Del arte de la pintura (“On the Art of Painting”) in 1649.

  • del Carmen, Ronnie (Filipino film director, writer, and artist)
  • Del Castillo, Michel (Spanish author)

    Michel del Castillo, Spanish-born novelist writing in French, who became famous at 24 for a short novel, Tanguy (1957; A Child of Our Time). Though written as fiction, it is the story of his experiences as a political refugee and a prisoner in concentration camps, and, like The Diary of Anne Frank,

  • Del Ferro, Scipione (Italian mathematician)

    Scipione Ferro, Italian mathematician who is believed to have found a solution to the cubic equation x3 + px = q where p and q are positive numbers. Ferro attended the University of Bologna and, in 1496, accepted a position at the university as a lecturer in arithmetic and geometry; he remained at

  • Del Giudice, Daniele (Italian author)

    Italian literature: Fiction at the turn of the 21st century: … and painstaking observer and stylist Daniele Del Giudice—were “discovered” in the early 1980s by Italo Calvino. In novels such as Macno (1984; Eng. trans. Macno) and Yucatan (1986; Eng. trans. Yucatan), De Carlo, a cinematographic recorder of surfaces, deliberately created and manipulated characters without depth, while Del Giudice, in Lo…

  • Del modo di regolare i fiumi, e i torrenti (work by Frisi)

    Paolo Frisi: …fiumi, e i torrenti (1762; A Treatise on Rivers and Torrents), a summary of the best information in this field, was widely used as an engineering handbook. The commentaries he wrote on the work of such scientists as Galileo Galilei and Sir Isaac Newton were influential in bringing their ideas…

  • Del modo di trattare i sudditi della Val di Chiana ribellati (work by Machiavelli)

    Niccolò Machiavelli: Early life and political career: …Val di Chiana ribellati (On the Way to Deal with the Rebel Subjects of the Valdichiana). Anticipating his later Discourses on Livy, a commentary on the ancient Roman historian, in this work he contrasts the errors of Florence with the wisdom of the Romans and declares that in dealing…

  • Del Monte Corporation (American corporation)

    Del Monte Foods, American corporation engaged primarily in processing, canning, and distributing food. It is a major grower and distributor of bananas and pineapples, and it owns subsidiaries engaged in trucking, public warehousing, institutional food service and vending, building maintenance, and

  • Del Monte Foods (American corporation)

    Del Monte Foods, American corporation engaged primarily in processing, canning, and distributing food. It is a major grower and distributor of bananas and pineapples, and it owns subsidiaries engaged in trucking, public warehousing, institutional food service and vending, building maintenance, and

  • Del primato morale e civile degli italiani (book by Gioberti)

    Vincenzo Gioberti: …In his most celebrated work, Del primato morale e civile degli italiani (1843; “On the Moral and Civil Primacy of the Italian Race”), he sought to present practical methods of realizing his political ideals. Asserting the value of the unique contribution that federated Italians might make to world civilization, he…

  • Del rey abajo, ninguno (work by Rojas Zorrilla)

    Francisco de Rojas Zorrilla: …marks his best known play, Del rey abajo, ninguno (“Below the King, No One”).

  • Del rinnovamento civile d’Italia (work by Gioberti)

    Vincenzo Gioberti: His second important political work, Del rinnovamento civile d’Italia (1851; “On the Civil Renewal of Italy”), showed greater approval of total democracy, inspired by popular risings in 1848 in Venice and Milan. Gioberti’s fortunes were then reversed: the papacy turned against him, and his works were placed on its Index…

  • Del Rio (Texas, United States)

    Del Rio, city, seat (1885) of Val Verde county, southwestern Texas, U.S. It lies along the Rio Grande, there bridged to Ciudad Acu?a, Mexico, 145 miles (233 km) west of San Antonio. The original Spanish mission of San Felipe del Rio (c. 1675) on the site was destroyed by Indians, but the name

  • del Río, Andrés Manuel (Spanish mineralogist)

    vanadium: …(1801) by the Spanish mineralogist Andrés Manuel del Río, who named it erythronium but eventually came to believe it was merely impure chromium. The element was rediscovered (1830) by the Swedish chemist Nils Gabriel Sefstr?m, who named it after Vanadis, the Scandinavian goddess of beauty and youth, a name suggested…

  • del Río, Eduardo (Mexican cartoonist)

    comic strip: The fact-based comic: historical, didactic, political, narrative: …Gonick and the Mexican cartoonist Rius (Eduardo del Río). These are at once elementary introductions and sophisticated presentations of sometimes difficult material (Gonick, for instance, has produced “cartoon guides” to physics, genetics, and computer science); they mix line drawings and explanations with asides, political observations, touches of satire, and farcical,…

  • del Rio, Magdalena Nile (Argentine-Spanish actress and singer)

    Imperio Argentina, (Magdalena Nile del Rio), Argentine-born Spanish actress and singer (born Dec. 26, 1906, Buenos Aires, Arg.—died Aug. 22, 2003, Benalmádena, Spain), was one of the biggest stars of the early Spanish cinema, making the transition from silent movies to talkies and from b

  • del Rivero, Dolores Conchita Figueroa (American actress)

    Chita Rivera, American dancer, singer, and actress who was best known for her energetic performances in such Broadway musicals as West Side Story, Chicago, and Kiss of the Spider Woman. Rivera’s first performances were in shows her brother organized for production in the basement of their home. She

  • Del Ruth, Roy (American filmmaker)

    Roy Del Ruth , American filmmaker who worked with various stars, notably James Cagney, and directed a number of popular musicals in the 1930s. Del Ruth was a newspaperman in Philadelphia before moving to Hollywood in 1915 to become a gag writer for Mack Sennett. He soon was directing comedy shorts,

  • Del sentimiento trágico de la vida en los hombres y en los pueblos (work by Unamuno)

    Miguel de Unamuno: …y en los pueblos (1913; The Tragic Sense of Life in Men and Peoples), in which he stressed the vital role spiritual anxiety plays in driving man to live the fullest possible life. This and other themes were explored in La agonía del cristianismo (1925; The Agony of Christianity).

  • Del sonare sopra ’l basso con tutti li stromenti e dell’uso loro nel conserto (treatise by Agazzari)

    Agostino Agazzari: …composer famous for his treatise, Del sonare sopra ’l basso con tutti li stromenti e dell’uso loro nel conserto (1607; “On Playing Upon the Thoroughbass with All the Instruments and Their Use in an Ensemble”), one of the earliest instruction books for performing from the thoroughbass.

  • Del Toro, Benicio (Puerto Rican actor)

    Benicio Del Toro, Puerto Rican-born actor who emerged in the 1990s as a compelling character actor with a flair for oddball roles. While sources are divided as to where Del Toro was born, it is agreed that he spent his early childhood in Santurce, Puerto Rico. He was nine years old when his mother

  • del Toro, Guillermo (Mexican director)

    Guillermo del Toro, Mexican director, screenwriter, and producer who was known for imbuing horror and fantasy films with emotional and thematic complexity. Del Toro developed an interest in both film and horror stories as a child. He began making short films while in high school and later studied

  • del Valle, Eric Arturo (president of Panama)

    Panama: Ethnic groups: …Western Hemisphere’s first Jewish president, Eric Arturo Delvalle (del Valle), who served in the 1980s.

  • Delaborde, J. B. (French craftsman)

    electronic instrument: Precursors of electronic instruments: Delaborde of Paris invented an electric harpsichord. Experimental instruments incorporating solenoids, motors, and other electromechanical elements continued to be invented throughout the 19th century. One of the earliest instruments to generate musical tones by purely electric means was William Duddell’s singing arc, in which the…

  • Delacour, Jean Theodore (French aviculturist)

    Jean Theodore Delacour, French-American aviculturist known for discovering and rearing some of the world’s rarest birds. As a boy, Delacour collected more than 1,300 live birds, which were destroyed, along with the area they inhabited, during World War I. He later made expeditions to Asia, Africa,

  • Delacroix, Eugène (French artist)

    Eugène Delacroix, the greatest French Romantic painter, whose use of colour was influential in the development of both Impressionist and Post-Impressionist painting. His inspiration came chiefly from historical or contemporary events or literature, and a visit to Morocco in 1832 provided him with

  • Delacroix, Ferdinand-Eugène-Victor (French artist)

    Eugène Delacroix, the greatest French Romantic painter, whose use of colour was influential in the development of both Impressionist and Post-Impressionist painting. His inspiration came chiefly from historical or contemporary events or literature, and a visit to Morocco in 1832 provided him with

  • Delafón, Remigio Andrés (Spanish writer)

    Rosario de Acu?a, Spanish playwright, essayist, and short-story writer known for her controversial liberal views. Little is known of Acu?a’s early life. One of Spain’s few women playwrights, she was considered radical for her willingness to address such issues as religious fanaticism, atheism,

  • Delafosse, Charles (French artist)

    Charles de La Fosse, painter whose decorative historical and allegorical murals, while continuing a variant of the stately French Baroque manner of the 17th century, began to develop a lighter, more brightly coloured style that presaged the Rococo painting of the 18th century. The greatest

  • delafossite (mineral)

    Delafossite, metallic, black copper and iron oxide (CuFeO2) that is found as a secondary mineral associated with other oxide minerals of copper and iron in Sonora, Mex.; Pedroso, Spain; and Pfaffenreuth, Ger. It is abundant in Bisbee, Ariz., and also occurs in Nevada and Idaho. For detailed

  • Delag (German airship line)

    Ferdinand, Graf von Zeppelin: A passenger service known as Delag (Deutsche-Luftschiffahrts AG) was established in 1910, but Zeppelin died before attaining his goal of transcontinental flight.

  • Delage (French car)

    automobile: The age of the classic cars: …Spain and France; the Bugatti, Delage, Delahaye, Hotchkiss, Talbot (Darracq), and Voisin of France; the Duesenberg, Cadillac, Packard, and Pierce-Arrow of the United States; the Horch, Maybach, and

  • Delage, Yves (French zoologist)

    Yves Delage, French zoologist known for his research and elucidation of invertebrate physiology and anatomy. He also discovered the equilibrium-stabilizing function of the semicircular canals in the inner ear (1886). Delage became a member of the zoology staff at the Sorbonne in 1880 and at Caen,

  • Delagoa Bay (bay, Mozambique)

    Delagoa Bay, bay on the southeast coast of Mozambique, East Africa, near the South African border. The name probably derives from Baía da Lagoa (Bay of the Lagoon). It is 19 mi (31 km) long and 16 mi wide, with Inhaca Island, a tourist resort, at its mouth and the port of Maputo, capital of M

  • Delahaye (French car)

    automobile: The age of the classic cars: …and France; the Bugatti, Delage, Delahaye, Hotchkiss, Talbot (Darracq), and Voisin of France; the Duesenberg, Cadillac, Packard, and Pierce-Arrow of the United States; the Horch, Maybach, and Mercedes-Benz

  • delaine (fabric)

    Delaine, (French: “of wool”) any high-grade woolen or worsted fabric made of fine combing wool. Delaine was originally a high-quality women’s wear dress material. The word delaine is still applied to a staple all-wool fabric made in plain weave and of compact structure. Delaine sheep, a Merino

  • Delaine sheep (mammal)

    delaine: Delaine sheep, a Merino type, are raised in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Germany, Poland, and to a lesser extent in France.

  • Delaki, Mount (mountain, Alor Islands, Indonesia)

    Alor Islands: Pantar Island is high (Mount Delaki rises to 4,324 feet [1,318 metres]), with a rugged coast. The inhabitants speak languages belonging to the Austronesian (Malayo-Polynesian) and Alor-Pantar families. Most of the people practice traditional religions, except for some Christian communities along the coasts and some Muslims. Festive occasions often…

  • Delalande, Michel-Richard (French composer)

    Michel-Richard Delalande, leading composer of sacred music in France in the early 18th century, one of the few composers who asserted any influence while Jean-Baptiste Lully lived. He became a chorister at Saint-Germain l’Auxerrois and learned to play several instruments. An organist at four Paris

  • Delambre, Jean-Baptiste-Joseph (French astronomer)

    Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Delambre, French astronomer who prepared tables that plot the location of Uranus. In 1771 Delambre became tutor to the son of M. d’Assy, receiver general of finances. In 1788 d’Assy built an observatory for Delambre’s use. There he observed and computed almost uninterruptedly

  • Delamere Forest (forest, England, United Kingdom)

    Cheshire West and Chester: …the ancient hunting ground of Delamere Forest. Today the Delamere Forest is the largest woodland in the unitary authority, and the Delamere Forest Park, northeast of Chester city, is a popular destination for walking and cycling. Chester’s medieval city walls and entrance gates are well preserved (which is unusual for…

  • Delamere of Dunham Massie, George Booth, 1st Baron (English politician)

    George Booth, 1st Baron Delamere, English politician who led an abortive Royalist revolt against the Commonwealth government in August 1659. His insurrection foreshadowed the Royalist upsurge that resulted in the restoration of the Stuart monarchy in 1660. Booth sat in the Long Parliament in 1645

  • Delamere of Vale Royal, Hugh Cholmondeley, 3rd Baron (British colonist)

    Hugh Cholmondeley, 3rd Baron Delamere, a leader of European colonists in British East Africa Protectorate (now Kenya). Controversial and outspoken, Delamere was the central figure of the white community in Kenya. He believed that civilization could be brought to Africa only by European settlement

  • Delamotte, Philip Henry (English artist)

    history of photography: Landscape and architectural documentation: In the early 1850s Philip Henry Delamotte was hired to document the progress of the construction of the Crystal Place in London, and a few years later Robert Howlett depicted the building of the Great Eastern transatlantic steamship. Alfred and John Bool and Henry Dixon worked for the Society…

  • DeLancey, James (American colonial governor)

    James DeLancey, lieutenant governor and chief justice of the British colony of New York. The eldest son of Stephen DeLancey, a prominent New York merchant-politician, James was sent to Cambridge and later studied law in London. He returned to New York, where he became a member of the Governor’s

  • DeLand (Florida, United States)

    De Land, city, seat (1888) of Volusia county, northeastern Florida, U.S. It is situated just east of the St. Johns River, about 25 miles (40 km) southwest of Daytona Beach. The area’s original inhabitants, the Timucua Indians, were driven from the region by the Creek and British by the mid-18th

  • Deland, Margaret (American author)

    Margaret Deland, American writer who frequently portrayed small-town life. Deland grew up in the home of an aunt and uncle in Maple Grove (now part of Allegheny), Pennsylvania, and later in Manchester. She studied at private schools and at Cooper Union in New York City, and for a time taught

  • Deland, Margaretta Wade (American author)

    Margaret Deland, American writer who frequently portrayed small-town life. Deland grew up in the home of an aunt and uncle in Maple Grove (now part of Allegheny), Pennsylvania, and later in Manchester. She studied at private schools and at Cooper Union in New York City, and for a time taught

  • Delane, John Thaddeus (British journalist)

    John Thaddeus Delane, editor of The Times of London for 36 years. Delane, the second son of a distinguished barrister and author, was reared in Easthampstead, Berkshire, where his family was neighbour to John Walter II, owner of The Times. Walter knew young Delane and marked the boy as a likely

  • Delaney, Shelagh (British dramatist)

    Shelagh Delaney, British playwright who, at age 19, won critical acclaim and popular success with the London production of her first play, A Taste of Honey (1958). Two years later Delaney received the Drama Critics’ Circle Award for the play’s New York City production. By her own account, Delaney

  • Delannoy, Jean (French filmmaker)

    Jean Delannoy, French filmmaker (born Jan. 12, 1908, Noisy-le-Sec, France—died June 18, 2008, Guainville, France), enjoyed tremendous popularity with French audiences for his films, many of which explored thought-provoking moral and philosophical issues, but he received intense criticism from

  • Delano Hotel (hotel, Miami, Florida, United States)

    Philippe Starck: For example, in the Delano Hotel (1995) in the South Beach area of Miami Beach, Florida, each room has a metal apple holder affixed to the wall; the phrase “An apple a day keeps the doctor away” is printed on the holder, promising a daily replenishment of apples.

  • Delano, Jane A. (American nurse and educator)

    Jane A. Delano, American nurse and educator who made possible the enlistment of more than 20,000 U.S. nurses for overseas duty during World War I. Delano taught school for two years and graduated from the Bellevue Hospital School of Nursing in New York City in 1886. She became superintendent of

  • Delano, Jane Arminda (American nurse and educator)

    Jane A. Delano, American nurse and educator who made possible the enlistment of more than 20,000 U.S. nurses for overseas duty during World War I. Delano taught school for two years and graduated from the Bellevue Hospital School of Nursing in New York City in 1886. She became superintendent of

  • Delano: The Story of the California Grape Strike (work by Dunne)

    John Gregory Dunne: Dunne’s first book, Delano: The Story of the California Grape Strike (1967; rev. ed., 1971), examines the labour and social issues surrounding the grape pickers’ strike of the mid-1960s. The Studio (1969) is a telling portrait of the motion-picture industry as seen through the eyes of the movie…

  • Delano?, Bertrand (French politician)

    Bertrand Delano?, French politician who served as mayor of Paris (2001–14). He was the first socialist mayor of the French capital in 130 years. He also was one of the first openly gay politicians in Europe to lead a major city. After spending his early years in French-controlled North Africa,

  • Delany’s swamp mouse (rodent)

    rodent: General features: One of the smallest is Delany’s swamp mouse (Delanymys brooksi), associated with bamboo in the marshes and mountain forests in Africa. It weighs 5 to 7 grams, and the body is 5 to 6 cm long. The largest is the capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) of Central and South America, which weighs…

  • Delany, Annie Elizabeth (American author)

    Annie Elizabeth Delany, ("BESSIE"), noted U.S. centenarian and co-writer with her older sister, Sadie, of Having Our Say (1993), which became the basis of a Broadway play and chronicled the changes the African-American sisters faced during over a century of living (b. Sept. 3, 1891--d. Sept. 25,

  • Delany, Bessie (American author)

    Annie Elizabeth Delany, ("BESSIE"), noted U.S. centenarian and co-writer with her older sister, Sadie, of Having Our Say (1993), which became the basis of a Broadway play and chronicled the changes the African-American sisters faced during over a century of living (b. Sept. 3, 1891--d. Sept. 25,

  • Delany, Martin (American physician and abolitionist)

    Martin Delany, African American abolitionist, physician, and editor in the pre-Civil War period; his espousal of black nationalism and racial pride anticipated expressions of such views a century later. In search of quality education for their children, the Delanys moved to Pennsylvania when Martin

  • Delany, Martin Robison (American physician and abolitionist)

    Martin Delany, African American abolitionist, physician, and editor in the pre-Civil War period; his espousal of black nationalism and racial pride anticipated expressions of such views a century later. In search of quality education for their children, the Delanys moved to Pennsylvania when Martin

  • Delany, Sadie (American educator and author)

    Sarah Louise Delany, (“Sadie”), American centenarian, the first African American home economics teacher in white New York schools, and coauthor in 1993, with her sister Bessie, of Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters’ First 100 Years, which in 1995 was adapted into a Broadway play, and, in 1994, The

  • Delany, Samuel R. (American author and critic)

    Samuel R. Delany, American science-fiction novelist and critic whose highly imaginative works address sexual, racial, and social issues, heroic quests, and the nature of language. Delany attended City College of New York (now City University of New York) in the early 1960s. His first novel, The

  • Delany, Samuel Ray, Jr. (American author and critic)

    Samuel R. Delany, American science-fiction novelist and critic whose highly imaginative works address sexual, racial, and social issues, heroic quests, and the nature of language. Delany attended City College of New York (now City University of New York) in the early 1960s. His first novel, The

  • Delany, Sarah Louise (American educator and author)

    Sarah Louise Delany, (“Sadie”), American centenarian, the first African American home economics teacher in white New York schools, and coauthor in 1993, with her sister Bessie, of Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters’ First 100 Years, which in 1995 was adapted into a Broadway play, and, in 1994, The

  • Delanymys brooksi (rodent)

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