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  • Davenport, John (Puritan clergyman)

    John Davenport, Puritan clergyman and cofounder of the New Haven Colony (now New Haven, Conn.). Davenport was educated at the University of Oxford and later was elected vicar of the Church of St. Stephens in London. Because Holland was more hospitable to Puritans than was England, Davenport moved

  • Davenport, Marcia Gluck (American writer)

    Marcia Gluck Davenport, U.S. writer who was best known for her biography Mozart and the best-seller The Valley of Decision (b. June 9, 1903--d. Jan. 16,

  • Davenport, Thomas (American inventor)

    Thomas Davenport, American inventor of what was probably the first commercially successful electric motor, which he used with great ingenuity to power a number of established inventions. A blacksmith in Brandon, Vt., Davenport began experimenting with electromagnets after observing one in use at an

  • Davenport, Willie (American athlete)

    Willie Davenport, American athlete (born June 8, 1943, Troy, Ala.—died June 17, 2002, Chicago, Ill.), competed in four Summer (1964, 1968, 1972, and 1976, as a hurdler) and one Winter (1980, on the four-man bobsled team) Olympic Games—one of very few athletes to have competed in both Summer and W

  • Daventry (England, United Kingdom)

    Daventry, town and district, administrative and historic county of Northamptonshire, England. Daventry district’s rich, undulating landscape is predominantly rural, with more than 70 parishes. At the heart of the district is historic Daventry town. Nothing is known of Daventry town before Domesday

  • Daventry (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Daventry: district, administrative and historic county of Northamptonshire, England. Daventry district’s rich, undulating landscape is predominantly rural, with more than 70 parishes. At the heart of the district is historic Daventry town.

  • Daves, Delmer (American screenwriter and director)

    Delmer Daves, American writer and director of motion pictures who worked in a number of genres but was best known for his westerns, which include Broken Arrow (1950), The Last Wagon (1956), and 3:10 to Yuma (1957). Daves earned a law degree at Stanford University but decided to pursue a career in

  • Daves, Delmer Lawrence (American screenwriter and director)

    Delmer Daves, American writer and director of motion pictures who worked in a number of genres but was best known for his westerns, which include Broken Arrow (1950), The Last Wagon (1956), and 3:10 to Yuma (1957). Daves earned a law degree at Stanford University but decided to pursue a career in

  • Davey, Allen (American cinematographer)
  • Davey, Bruce (Australian producer and actor)
  • Davey, John (American horticulturalist)

    pruning: …tree surgery is attributed to John Davey of Kent, Ohio, who established a landscaping business there in 1880.

  • Davey, Jonathan (American student)

    Locke v. Davey: Facts of the case: Jonathan Davey received a Promise scholarship and enrolled in Northwest College (now Northwest University), a private accredited institution located near Seattle that was associated with the Assemblies of God church. Davey, whose ambition was to become a church pastor, chose to pursue a double major…

  • Davey, Keith Douglas (Canadian political figure)

    Keith Douglas Davey, (“the Rainmaker”), Canadian political figure (born April 21, 1926, Toronto, Ont.—died Jan. 17, 2011, Toronto), innovated the utilization of new contemporary automated polling techniques as national campaign director (1961–63, 1965) of the Liberal Party of Canada. After

  • Davey, Marie Augusta (American actress)

    Minnie Maddern Fiske, American actress who became one of the leading exemplars of realism on the American stage, especially through her performances in Henrik Ibsen’s plays. Fiske made her New York debut at the age of five and for the next few years played children’s roles—e.g., Eva in Uncle Tom’s

  • Davey, Norris Frank (New Zealand writer)

    Frank Sargeson, novelist and short-story writer whose ironic, stylistically diverse works made him the most widely known New Zealand literary figure of his day. Davey was born into a conservative Methodist family. His father was a businessman who eventually became the town clerk. Davey studied the

  • David (king of Israel)

    David, second king of ancient Israel. He was the father of Solomon, who expanded the empire that David built. He is an important figure in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The primary evidence for David’s career is constituted by several chapters in the books 1 and 2 Samuel in the Hebrew Bible

  • David (poem by Birney)

    Canadian literature: Modern period, 1900–60: …frequently anthologized tragic narrative “David” (1942), the first of many audacious, technically varied poems exploring the troubling nature of humanity and the cosmos. His publications include the verse play Trial of a City and Other Verse (1952) and poetic collections such as Rag & Bone Shop (1971) and Ghost…

  • David (torpedo boat)

    naval ship: Armour: Called Davids, they were weak but definite forerunners of the torpedo boat and the versatile destroyer.

  • David (marble sculpture by Michelangelo)

    David, marble sculpture executed from 1501 to 1504 by the Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo. The statue was commissioned for one of the buttresses of the cathedral of Florence and was carved from a block of marble that had been partially blocked out by other sculptors and left outdoors. After

  • David (hurricane)

    Dominica: Independence: Hurricane David severely damaged the island in August 1979. The storm not only largely destroyed the banana crop, the island’s economic mainstay, but it also carried away most of the island’s topsoil and virtually wiped out the country’s agricultural base. The following year, Hurricane Allen set…

  • David (bronze work by Donatello)

    Donatello: Early career: …the way for the bronze David, the first large-scale free-standing nude statue of the Renaissance. Well proportioned and superbly poised, it was conceived independently of any architectural setting. Its harmonious calm makes it the most classical of Donatello’s works. The statue was undoubtedly done for a private patron, but his…

  • David (marble work by Donatello)

    Donatello: Early career: …knowledge, a marble statue of David, shows an artistic debt to Ghiberti, who was then the leading Florentine exponent of International Gothic, a style of graceful, softly curved lines strongly influenced by northern European art. The David, originally intended for the cathedral, was moved in 1416 to the Palazzo Vecchio,…

  • David (work by Machaut)

    hocket: …French composer Guillaume de Machaut’s “David,” in which the two upper voices sing in hocket above a slower moving tenor.

  • David (work by Holm)

    children's literature: Denmark: , North to Freedom, 1965).

  • David (Panama)

    David, city, western Panama, on the David River and surrounded by fruit groves. It is Panama’s largest city outside of the Panama City metropolitan area and is an important commercial centre, served by the Pacific Ocean seaports of Pedregal and Puerto Armuelles on the Gulf of Chiriquí and by

  • David (duke of Rothesay)

    Robert III: …when Robert III’s eldest son, David, duke of Rothesay, took his place. The dissolute Rothesay died in March 1402 while imprisoned in Albany’s castle of Falkland, Fife. Perhaps in an attempt to save his remaining son, James (afterward James I, king of Scots), from death at Albany’s hands, Robert III…

  • David Aghmashenebeli (king of Georgia)

    David IV, king of Georgia (1089–1125). Sometimes known as David II, he became coruler with his father, Giorgi II, in 1089. David defeated the Turks in the Battle of Didgori (1122) and captured Tbilisi. Under his leadership Georgia became the strongest state in

  • David and Bathsheba (film by King [1951])

    Henry King: Later films: …Peck then worked together on David and Bathsheba (1951), a popular entry in the biblical-epic genre, and The Snows of Kilimanjaro (1952). The latter was based on Ernest Hemingway’s short story about a famous writer (played by Peck) who is fatally injured while hunting big game in Africa and reflects…

  • David and Goliath (painting by Gentileschi)

    Orazio Gentileschi: , David and Goliath (1610?) and Saint Cecilia and an Angel (c. 1617/1618 and c. 1621/1627; with Giovanni Lanfranco)—employ Caravaggio’s use of dramatic, unconventional gesture and monumental composition, his uncompromising realism and contemporary representation of figure types, and to some extent his strong chiaroscuro, or light-and-dark…

  • David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants (work by Gladwell)

    Malcolm Gladwell: David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants (2013) maintained that certain experiences and situations perceived as disadvantages are in fact advantages—and vice versa. Some critics asserted that much of the volume constituted glorified common wisdom and questioned the strength of the…

  • David and Lisa (film by Perry [1962])

    Frank Perry: …his first feature, the low-budget David and Lisa (1962), an independently made film about two mentally ill teenagers (played by Keir Dullea and Janet Margolin) who develop an emotional connection while in a home for disturbed youths. The sensitive drama was written by Perry’s wife, Eleanor, who dramatized a case…

  • David ap Gruffudd (Welsh prince)

    David ap Gruffudd, the last native prince of Gwynedd in northern Wales; he initiated a major rebellion against the English in Wales, and upon his death Wales fell completely under English rule. David’s grandfather, Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, had made Gwynedd the centre of Welsh power. After failing to

  • David ap Llywelyn (Welsh prince)

    David Ap Llywelyn, Welsh prince, ruler of the state of Gwynedd in northern Wales from 1240 to 1246. His father, Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, had made Gwynedd the centre of Welsh power, and his mother, Joan, was the illegitimate daughter of King John of England (ruled 1199–1216). Although Llywelyn

  • David at War (play by Goldfaden)

    Avrom Goldfaden: …his nearly 400 plays are David at War (the first Hebrew play produced in the United States; first performed, 1904), Shulamit (considered his masterwork, 1880), and Bar Kochba (1882).

  • David ben Zakkai (Jewish religious leader)

    Sa?adia ben Joseph: Life: …exilarch (head of Babylonian Jewry) David ben Zakkai as the gaon (“head”) of the academy of Sura, which had been transferred to Baghdad. Upon assuming this office, he recognized the need to systematize Talmudic law and canonize it by subject. Toward this end he produced Kitāb al-mawārīth (“Book on the…

  • David Bowie Is (art exhibition)

    David Bowie: …of a blockbuster art exhibition, David Bowie Is (opened 2013).

  • David Copperfield (film by Cukor [1935])

    Wilkins Micawber: In a 1935 film adaptation directed by George Cukor, American actor W.C. Fields gave a memorable performance as Micawber.

  • David Copperfield (novel by Dickens)

    David Copperfield, novel by English writer Charles Dickens, published serially in 1849–50 and in book form in 1850. David Copperfield has always been among Dickens’s most popular novels and was his own “favourite child.” The work is semiautobiographical, and, although the title character differs

  • David d’Angers, Pierre-Jean (French sculptor)

    Pierre-Jean David d’Angers, French sculptor, who sought to honour the heroes of modern times by means of an expressive form that could appeal to and inspire a broad public. David, the son of a carver, went to Paris as a teenager with 11 francs in his pocket to study at the école des Beaux-Arts

  • David de Mayrena, Marie-Charles (French adventurer)

    Marie-Charles David de Mayrena, eccentric French adventurer who became the self-styled king of the Sedang tribe of the northern Central Highlands in what is now southern Vietnam. After defrauding French authorities in Saigon, David de Mayrena fled to Kontum in the Central Highlands, where he

  • David Harum: A Story of American Life (work by Westcott)

    Edward Noyes Westcott: …banker whose posthumously published novel David Harum: A Story of American Life (1898) was immensely popular.

  • David Hume über den Glauben, oder Idealismus und Realismus (work by Jacobi)

    Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi: Jacobi replied in David Hume über den Glauben, oder Idealismus und Realismus (1787; “David Hume on Belief, or Idealism and Realism”), showing his concept of belief to be no different from that held by such advanced philosophers as Hume.

  • David I (king of Scotland)

    David I, one of the most powerful Scottish kings (reigned from 1124). He admitted into Scotland an Anglo-French (Norman) aristocracy that played a major part in the later history of the kingdom. He also reorganized Scottish Christianity to conform with continental European and English usages and

  • David II (king of Scotland)

    David II, king of Scots from 1329, although he spent 18 years in exile or in prison. His reign was marked by costly intermittent warfare with England, a decline in the prestige of the monarchy, and an increase in the power of the barons. On July 17, 1328, in accordance with the Anglo-Scottish peace

  • David II (king of Georgia)

    David IV, king of Georgia (1089–1125). Sometimes known as David II, he became coruler with his father, Giorgi II, in 1089. David defeated the Turks in the Battle of Didgori (1122) and captured Tbilisi. Under his leadership Georgia became the strongest state in

  • David IV (king of Georgia)

    David IV, king of Georgia (1089–1125). Sometimes known as David II, he became coruler with his father, Giorgi II, in 1089. David defeated the Turks in the Battle of Didgori (1122) and captured Tbilisi. Under his leadership Georgia became the strongest state in

  • David Kalakaua (king of Hawaii)

    Kalakaua, king of Hawaii from 1874 to 1891. The son of a high chief, Kalakaua was a candidate to the throne in 1873 but lost the election to Lunalilo. When Lunalilo died the following year, the legislature then elected Kalakaua, who inaugurated a decidedly reactionary and pro-American reign. In

  • David Letterman Show, The (American television program)

    David Letterman: …him an NBC mid-morning show, The David Letterman Show. However, his unconventional humour—exemplified by the time he sent an audience member out to fetch him coffee—failed to engage daytime viewers. Although it received two Emmy Awards, the show was canceled after three months.

  • David of Sasun (Armenian legendary hero)

    Sasuntzi Davith: … dealing with the adventures of David of Sasun, a legendary Christian hero, in his defense against invaders from Egypt and Persia. The epic was based on oral tradition that presumably dates from the 8th to the 10th century; it was widely known from the 16th through the 19th century and…

  • David of Tao (Georgian prince)

    David of Tao, prince of the Bagratid family of Tao (Armenian: Tayk), a region between Georgia and Armenia. A just ruler and a friend of the church, he allied with Basil II to defeat the rebel Bardas Sclerus (976–979) and was rewarded with extensive lands that made him the most important ruler in

  • David Sears House (building, Boston, Massachusetts, United States)

    Alexander Parris: …early Boston project was the David Sears House (1816) on Beacon Street, now the Somerset Club. He was also responsible for numerous other private homes in Boston. One of Parris’s best-known designs is his St. Paul’s Church (1819), which, with its graceful Ionic portico fronting a Greek-temple-type structure, marked the…

  • Davíe Stefánsson frá Fagraskógi (Icelandic author)

    Davíe Stefánsson, Icelandic poet and novelist, best known as a poet of humanity. Stefánsson came of a cultured yeoman family and was brought up with a love for his homeland, its literature, and its folklore. He frequently journeyed abroad but lived most of his life in the town of Akureyri, where he

  • David the Builder (king of Georgia)

    David IV, king of Georgia (1089–1125). Sometimes known as David II, he became coruler with his father, Giorgi II, in 1089. David defeated the Turks in the Battle of Didgori (1122) and captured Tbilisi. Under his leadership Georgia became the strongest state in

  • David with the Head of Goliath (painting by Castagno)

    Andrea del Castagno: …achieved similar force in his David with the Head of Goliath (c. 1450–55), painted on a shield. His last dated work (in Florence Cathedral) is an equestrian portrait of Niccolò da Tolentino. Castagno’s emotionally expressive realism was strongly influenced by Donatello, Domenico, and perhaps Piero della Francesca, and Castagno’s work…

  • David’s maple (plant)

    maple: hersii), and the David’s maple (A. davidii). The chalk maple, with whitish bark, is sometimes classified as A. leucoderme, although some authorities consider it a subspecies of sugar maple.

  • David, Armand (French missionary)

    giant panda: Conservation and classification: …St?tzner expedition of 1913–15, although Armand David, a Vincentian missionary, discovered some panda furs in 1869.

  • David, Eduard Heinrich (German politician)

    Eduard Heinrich David, a leader of the revisionist wing of the German Social Democratic Party and a minister in the early years of the Weimar Republic (1919–33). As a young grammar school teacher, David founded (1893) the Socialist Mitteldeutsche Sonntagszeitung (“Mid-German Sunday News”); but his

  • David, Eduard Heinrich Rudolph (German politician)

    Eduard Heinrich David, a leader of the revisionist wing of the German Social Democratic Party and a minister in the early years of the Weimar Republic (1919–33). As a young grammar school teacher, David founded (1893) the Socialist Mitteldeutsche Sonntagszeitung (“Mid-German Sunday News”); but his

  • David, Félicien-César (French composer)

    Félicien-César David, composer whose music opened the door for the Oriental exoticism that was to become a fixture in French Romantic music. David was choirmaster at the Saint-Sauveur Cathedral at Aix-en-Provence (1829) and in 1830 studied at the Paris Conservatory. The following year he joined the

  • Dávid, Ferenc (Unitarian preacher)

    Ferenc Dávid, Unitarian preacher, writer, and theologian influential in promoting religious toleration and the growth of anti-Trinitarian thought in Hungary. After successively rejecting Roman Catholicism and Lutheranism, in 1566 Dávid became bishop of the Calvinist community at Kolozsvár and court

  • David, Gerard (Netherlandish painter)

    Gerard David, Netherlandish painter who was the last great master of the Bruges school. Very little is known about David’s early life, during which time his work reflects the influence of Jacob Janszoon, Dieric Bouts, and Geertgen Tot Sint Jans. He went to Bruges, presumably from Haarlem, where it

  • David, Hal (American lyricist)

    Hal David, (Harold Lane David), American lyricist (born May 25, 1921, New York, N.Y.—died Sept. 1, 2012, Los Angeles, Calif.), partnered in 1956 with pianist Burt Bacharach, and together they created some of the most memorable songs of the 1960s and ’70s, especially such classics for singer Dionne

  • David, Harold Lane (American lyricist)

    Hal David, (Harold Lane David), American lyricist (born May 25, 1921, New York, N.Y.—died Sept. 1, 2012, Los Angeles, Calif.), partnered in 1956 with pianist Burt Bacharach, and together they created some of the most memorable songs of the 1960s and ’70s, especially such classics for singer Dionne

  • David, House of (religious sect)

    Benton Harbor: The Israelite House of David, a religious sect, established a colony there in 1903. The city is also the site of Lake Michigan College (1946), a two-year institution, as well as a branch of Siena Heights University (1982).

  • David, Jacques-Louis (French painter)

    Jacques-Louis David, the most celebrated French artist of his day and a principal exponent of the late 18th-century Neoclassical reaction against the Rococo style. David won wide acclaim with his huge canvases on classical themes (e.g., Oath of the Horatii, 1784). When the French Revolution began

  • David, Larry (American comedian and writer)

    Larry David, American comedian and actor who was best known as the cocreator of the television series Seinfeld (1989–98) and as the star of Curb Your Enthusiasm (2000– ). David attended the University of Maryland and graduated (1970) with a degree in history. He then returned to Brooklyn and found

  • David, Lawrence Gene (American comedian and writer)

    Larry David, American comedian and actor who was best known as the cocreator of the television series Seinfeld (1989–98) and as the star of Curb Your Enthusiasm (2000– ). David attended the University of Maryland and graduated (1970) with a degree in history. He then returned to Brooklyn and found

  • David, Nicol (Malaysian squash player)

    Nicol David, Malaysian squash player who dominated the sport in the early 21st century and became the first to win eight World Open crowns (2005–06, 2008–12, 2014). David’s interest in squash started at the age of five. In 1997 she reached the quarterfinals of the World Junior Squash Championships,

  • David, Peter (American writer)

    Incredible Hulk: …Byrne in the 1980s and Peter David in the 1990s—to alter the balance between Banner’s and the Hulk’s personalities, often to tremendous dramatic effect.

  • David, Shield of (Judaism)

    Star of David, Jewish symbol composed of two overlaid equilateral triangles that form a six-pointed star. It appears on synagogues, Jewish tombstones, and the flag of the State of Israel. The symbol—which historically was not limited to use by Jews—originated in antiquity, when, side by side with

  • David, Sir T. W. Edgeworth (Australian geologist)

    Sir T.W. Edgeworth David, geologist noted for his monumental study of the geology of Australia. David served as assistant geologist for the government survey of New South Wales from 1882 until 1891, when he became professor of geology at the University of Sydney. A leader in the investigation of

  • David, Sir Tannatt William Edgeworth (Australian geologist)

    Sir T.W. Edgeworth David, geologist noted for his monumental study of the geology of Australia. David served as assistant geologist for the government survey of New South Wales from 1882 until 1891, when he became professor of geology at the University of Sydney. A leader in the investigation of

  • David, St. (patron saint of Wales)

    St. David, ; feast day March 1), patron saint of Wales. Little is known of his life. According to the hagiography (c. 1090) by the Welsh scholar Rhygyfarch, he was the son of the chieftain Sant, who raped David’s mother, St. Non. Educated at Henfynyw, Cardigan, he seemingly took a prominent part in

  • David, Star of (Judaism)

    Star of David, Jewish symbol composed of two overlaid equilateral triangles that form a six-pointed star. It appears on synagogues, Jewish tombstones, and the flag of the State of Israel. The symbol—which historically was not limited to use by Jews—originated in antiquity, when, side by side with

  • David, Thayer (American actor)

    Journey to the Center of the Earth: Cast: Assorted References

  • David, Tower of (stronghold, Jerusalem)

    Jerusalem: Architecture: The Citadel (with David’s Tower) beside the Jaffa Gate, which acquired its present form in the 16th century, was created over ruins from the Hasmonean and Herodian periods, integrating large parts of Crusader structures and some Mamlūk additions. The large number of churches mainly represent…

  • Davidescu, Nicolae (Romanian poet)

    Nicolae Davidescu, Romanian poet and novelist whose early poems, Inscrip?ii (1916), showed the influence of Charles Baudelaire. Among his prose works the novel Zana din fundul lacului (1912; “The Fairy at the Bottom of the Lake”) was an exercise in symbolism, and Vioara mut? (1928; “The Muted

  • Davidge, Christopher (British business executive)

    art market: The 21st century: …Christie’s chief executive officer (CEO), Christopher Davidge, provided the U.S. Justice Department with damning evidence of past collusion between Sotheby’s and Christie’s over the fixing of commission rates. Sotheby’s primary shareholder and CEO, A. Alfred Taubman, was tried and sentenced in the U.S. criminal court system, but Christie’s previous CEO,…

  • Davidia involucrata (plant)

    Dove tree, (species Davidia involucrata), small flowering tree, in the family Nyssaceae, with showy creamy bracts (modified leaves) surrounding the flowers. Native to southwestern China, it has been introduced elsewhere. Pyramidal in shape, with large bright-green leaves, it is especially

  • Davidian Seventh-day Adventist Association (religion)

    Branch Davidian: Other Davidian groups: Others include the Davidian Seventh-day Adventist Association headquartered in Exeter, Missouri, and the General Association of Davidian Seventh-day Adventists in Salem, South Carolina. Both groups were reorganized in the early 1960s to continue what they saw as the original teachings of the Davidian SDAs; neither had any connection…

  • Davidian Seventh-day Adventist Church (religion)

    Branch Davidian: …an offshoot group of the Davidian Seventh-day Adventist Church that made headlines on February 28, 1993, when its Mount Carmel headquarters near Waco, Texas, was raided by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF); four federal agents were killed in the assault. A lengthy standoff between the group…

  • Davidian Seventh-day Adventists, General Association of (religion)

    Branch Davidian: David Koresh and the ATF raid: …Mount Carmel and established the General Association of Davidian Seventh-day Adventists. He called his members to a purer life and promised that Christ would return soon after the members reached a state of moral maturity. When Roden died in 1978, members were torn between allegiance to his wife, Lois, and…

  • Davidis, Franciscus (Unitarian preacher)

    Ferenc Dávid, Unitarian preacher, writer, and theologian influential in promoting religious toleration and the growth of anti-Trinitarian thought in Hungary. After successively rejecting Roman Catholicism and Lutheranism, in 1566 Dávid became bishop of the Calvinist community at Kolozsvár and court

  • Davidist (Protestant religious group)

    David Joris: He founded the Davidists, or Jorists, who viewed Joris as a prophet and whose internal dissension led—three years after his death—to the sensational cremation of his body after his posthumous conviction as a heretic.

  • Davidoff’s cell (anatomy)

    Paneth’s cell, specialized type of epithelial cell found in the mucous-membrane lining of the small intestine and of the appendix, at the base of tubelike depressions known as Lieberkühn glands. Named for the 19th-century Austrian physiologist Joseph Paneth, the cell has one nucleus at its base

  • Davidoglu, M. (Romanian author)

    Romanian literature: After World War II: …the problems of contemporary life, Mihail Davidoglu, the author of plays set in mines and factories, and the intellectual but didactic Horia Lovinescu.

  • Davidovi?, Ljubomir (prime minister of Yugoslavia)

    Ljubomir Davidovi?, twice prime minister (1919–20, 1924) of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (later called Yugoslavia). Entering the Serbian Parliament in 1901, Davidovi? helped found the Independent Radical Party in the same year. He was elected leader of his party in 1912 and served as

  • Davidsen, Arthur (American astrophysicist)

    Arthur Davidsen, American astrophysicist (born May 26, 1944, Freeport, N.Y.—died July 19, 2001, Baltimore, Md.), was a leading researcher in the fields of high-energy astrophysics and ultraviolet space astronomy. After service in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War, Davidsen earned a Ph.D. in a

  • Davidson Academy (college, Tennessee, United States)

    Vanderbilt University: In 1979 Vanderbilt acquired George Peabody College for Teachers, which originated in 1785 as Davidson Academy and developed into a leading teacher-training school. The Blair School of Music, founded in 1964, became a part of the university in 1981.

  • Davidson College (college, Davidson, North Carolina, United States)

    Davidson College, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Davidson, North Carolina, U.S. It is a liberal arts college with bachelor’s degree programs in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences and is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Junior-year students can

  • Davidson Current (current, Pacific Ocean)

    Davidson Current, surface oceanic countercurrent of the North Pacific Ocean along the coast of California, flowing north to latitude 48° N. The Davidson Current develops during the winter months, when upwelling has

  • Davidson of Lambeth, Randall Thomas Davidson, Baron (archbishop of Canterbury)

    Randall Thomas Davidson, Baron Davidson, Anglican archbishop of Canterbury who was prominent as a speaker in parliamentary debates on moral and national questions during his 25-year tenure. Ordained in 1875, Davidson became resident chaplain two years later to the archbishop of Canterbury,

  • Davidson, Bruce (American photographer)

    Bruce Davidson, American photographer and filmmaker whose emotionally charged images frequently convey the loneliness and isolation of the subjects portrayed. Davidson studied photography at the Rochester (New York) Institute of Technology (1951–54) and the School of Design of Yale University

  • Davidson, Donald (American philosopher)

    Donald Davidson, American philosopher known for his strikingly original and unusually systematic treatments of traditional problems in a number of fields. Davidson’s graduate work in philosophy at Harvard University was interrupted by three years of service in the U.S. Navy (1942–45). He was

  • Davidson, Donald (American author)

    Donald Davidson, American poet, essayist, and teacher who warned against technology and idealized the agrarian, pre-Civil War American South. While attending Vanderbilt University, Nashville (B.A., 1917; M.A., 1922), Davidson became one of the Fugitives, a group of Southern writers determined to

  • Davidson, Donald Grady (American author)

    Donald Davidson, American poet, essayist, and teacher who warned against technology and idealized the agrarian, pre-Civil War American South. While attending Vanderbilt University, Nashville (B.A., 1917; M.A., 1922), Davidson became one of the Fugitives, a group of Southern writers determined to

  • Davidson, Gordon (American theatre director)

    Gordon Davidson, American theatre director (born May 7, 1933, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died Oct. 2, 2016, Los Angeles, Calif.), was the founding artistic director (1967–2005) of the Center Theatre Group/Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles and was regarded as one of the pioneering leaders of the American regional

  • Davidson, John (British economist)

    wage and salary: Bargaining theory: …to a considerable extent by John Davidson, who proposed in The Bargain Theory of Wages (1898) that the determination of wages is an extremely complicated process involving numerous influences that interact to establish the relative bargaining strength of the parties.

  • Davidson, John (Scottish poet)

    John Davidson, Scottish poet and playwright whose best work shows him a master of the narrative lyrical ballad. After studying at the University of Edinburgh, Davidson became a teacher, meanwhile writing a number of blank-verse dramas that failed to win recognition. In 1890 he went to London,

  • Davidson, Lionel (British novelist)

    Lionel Davidson, British novelist (born March 31, 1922, Hull, Yorkshire, Eng.—died Oct. 21, 2009, London, Eng.), wrote thrillers that drew from the classic spy genre as well as from historical and literary sources. Davidson was the son of Eastern European Jewish immigrants and as a boy moved with

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