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  • Dunstan, Donald (Australian politician)

    Donald Allan Dunstan, Australian politician whose progressive policies during his tenure as premier of South Australia (1967–68 and 1970–79) helped improve social services and antidiscrimination and consumer-protection laws and fostered a commitment to culture (b. Sept. 21, 1926, Suva, Fiji—d. Feb.

  • Dunster (England, United Kingdom)

    Dunster, town (parish), West Somerset district, administrative and historic county of Somerset, southwestern England. It lies at the edge of Exmoor National Park and 1.5 miles (2.4 km) from Dunster Beach on the Bristol Channel. Dunster is dominated by its hilltop castle, and the remains of a

  • Dunster, Henry (American minister and educator)

    Henry Dunster, American clergyman and first president of Harvard College. Dunster was educated at the University of Cambridge (B.A., 1631; M.A., 1634) and then taught school and served as curate of Bury. He had a reputation as a learned man, and three weeks after his arrival in Massachusetts he was

  • Dunton (Illinois, United States)

    Arlington Heights, village, Cook county, northeastern Illinois, U.S. It lies about 30 miles (50 km) northwest of downtown Chicago. Settled in 1836, it was known as Dunton for William Dunton, the original settler, until 1874, when the present name was adopted. A rail connection with Chicago was

  • Dunton, John (English publisher)

    history of publishing: Beginnings in the 17th century: …run by a London publisher, John Dunton, to resolve “all the most Nice and Curious Questions.” Soon after came the Gentleman’s Journal (1692–94), started by the French-born Peter Anthony Motteux, with a monthly blend of news, prose, and poetry. In 1693, after devoting some experimental numbers of the Athenian Mercury…

  • Dunvegan Castle (castle, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Skye: Dunvegan Castle, home of the MacLeods, the chief clan of Skye, was built in the 9th century and has been occupied longer than any other house in Scotland.

  • Dunwich (England, United Kingdom)

    Dunwich, village (parish), Suffolk Coastal district, administrative and historic county of Suffolk, England, on the North Sea coast. The first development on the site was probably a Romano-British community, and in Anglo-Saxon days it became the most important commercial centre in East Anglia.

  • Dunwoody, Ann E. (United States general)

    Ann E. Dunwoody, U.S. general who in 2008 became the first woman to reach four-star status in the U.S. Army. Dunwoody’s father was a career army officer and a decorated veteran, and her childhood was spent traveling with her family from post to post. Though she had planned on a career in physical

  • duo (music)

    chamber music: Sources and instruments: …were called variously solo sonatas, duos, or sonate a due. The combinations of violin and continuo or cello and continuo were favoured, and sonatas for those combinations took regular places in the chamber-music field.

  • Duo-Collages (work by Arp and Taeuber-Arp)

    Sophie Taeuber-Arp: …multimedia works that they called Duo-Collages. Those early works were founded on geometry and patterns and were visibly influenced by Taeuber-Arp’s experience with textile design. Starting in 1916 she taught textile design at Zürich’s School of Arts and Crafts, a position she held through at least 1928. In 1916 she…

  • duodecimal number system (mathematics)

    numerals and numeral systems: Number bases: …is otherwise combined with the duodecimal, or base 12, system.

  • duodenal ulcer (pathology)

    digestive system disease: Ulcerative diseases: In the Western world duodenal ulcer is much more common than gastric ulcer, occurs more often in men than in women, and is aggravated by stress. In Japan gastric ulcer is more common than duodenal ulcer and is thought to be related to the raw fish and acetic acid…

  • duodenum (anatomy)

    Duodenum, the first part of the small intestine, which receives partially digested food from the stomach and begins the absorption of nutrients. The duodenum is the shortest segment of the intestine and is about 23 to 28 cm (9 to 11 inches) long. It is roughly horseshoe-shaped, with the open end up

  • Duolun (China)

    Duolun, town, southeast-central Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, northern China. It is situated close to the border of Hebei province. Until 1950 the town was in the former Chahar province. Historically, Duolun was an important town. It was the site of Shangdu (the Xanadu of Samuel Taylor

  • Duomo (cathedral, Florence, Italy)

    construction: Reintroduction of dome construction: …or bell tower, of the cathedral of Florence. The design was made by the painter Giotto and constructed by cathedral masons from 1334 to 1359.

  • Duomo (cathedral, Pisa, Italy)

    Pisa: …buildings in the Piazza del Duomo, the so-called Square of Miracles, located at the northwestern end of the medieval walled city. This piazza contains the cathedral, or Duomo; the baptistery; the campanile, or Leaning Tower of Pisa; and the camposanto, or cemetery.

  • Duomo (cathedral, Naples, Italy)

    Naples: The Duomo: The Duomo is dedicated to the city’s patron, St. Januarius (San Gennaro), the liquefaction of whose congealed blood is the stimulus for two popular festivals each year. The rich chapel (or treasury) of St. Januarius forms part of an interior whose abundance of antique…

  • Duomo Piazza (piazza, Catania, Italy)

    Catania: …modern civic life is the Duomo Piazza, surrounded by 18th-century palaces and opening onto wide streets. Of the original structure of the cathedral founded by the Norman count Roger I in 1091, three apses of dark lava and part of the transept remain. After the 1693 earthquake it was rebuilt…

  • Duomo, Piazza del (piazza, Milan, Italy)

    Milan: City layout: …economic activity; and the great Piazza del Duomo, laid out before the cathedral in 1489. Once French emperor Napoleon I made the city the capital of his empire in 1805, he embarked on an ambitious program of city planning, and an elegant boulevard (the Foro Bonaparte) was built around the…

  • Duonelaitis, Kristijonas (Lithuanian poet)

    Kristijonas Donelaitis, Lutheran pastor and poet who was one of the greatest Lithuanian poets and one of the first to be appreciated outside his country. Donelaitis studied theology and classical languages at the University of K?nigsberg (1736–40) and in 1743 became pastor of the village of

  • Duong (king of Cambodia)

    Duong, king of Cambodia by 1841, formally invested in 1848, the last Cambodian king to reign before the French-imposed protectorate. Duong was the younger brother of King Chan II, who had ruled uncertainly in joint vassalage to Siam (Thailand) and Vietnam. Between 1841 and 1847 these two neighbours

  • Duong Van Minh (Vietnamese general)

    Duong Van Minh, (“Big Minh”), South Vietnamese general (born Feb. 16, 1916, Long An province, French Indochina—died Aug. 6, 2001, Pasadena, Calif.), was a key member of the military coup that overthrew South Vietnamese Pres. Ngo Dinh Diem in November 1963; in April 1975 he succeeded Nguyen Van T

  • duovir (ancient Roman politics)

    Duoviri, in ancient Rome, a magistracy of two men. Duoviri perduellionis were two judges, selected by the chief magistrate, who tried cases of crime against the state. Duoviri navales, at first appointed but later popularly elected (311–178 bc), had charge of a fleet. The two chief magistrates of

  • duoviri (ancient Roman politics)

    Duoviri, in ancient Rome, a magistracy of two men. Duoviri perduellionis were two judges, selected by the chief magistrate, who tried cases of crime against the state. Duoviri navales, at first appointed but later popularly elected (311–178 bc), had charge of a fleet. The two chief magistrates of

  • Duoyu de hua (work by Qu Qiubai)

    Qu Qiubai: …imprisonment Qu wrote his famous Duoyu de hua (“Superfluous Words”), in which he revealed the personal anguish he had undergone in submerging his needs for personal expression in order to aid the revolution.

  • DUP (political party, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), unionist political party in Northern Ireland. The DUP was cofounded by Ian Paisley, who led it from 1971 to 2008. The party traditionally competes for votes among Northern Ireland’s unionist Protestant community with the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP). Founded in 1971

  • dup’um (Korean social system)

    kolp'um: … or “true bone”) and six dup’ums (or “head ranks”). The two gols were from the royal and formerly royal families; the sixth dup’um through the fourth were from the general nobility, and the third down to the first from the commoners.

  • DuPage Center (Illinois, United States)

    Glen Ellyn, village, DuPage county, northeastern Illinois, U.S. It is a suburb of Chicago, lying 23 miles (37 km) west of downtown. Glen Ellyn’s phases of development were marked by seven name changes: Babcock’s Grove (1833), for the first settlers, Ralph and Morgan Babcock; DuPage Center (1834);

  • Dupain, Max (Australian photographer)

    Max Dupain, Australian photographer who developed an influential style of commercial photography that emphasized the geometric forms of his architectural and industrial subjects. Dupain, who exhibited his first landscape photographs while attending grammar school, studied at the East Sydney

  • Dupain, Maxwell Spencer (Australian photographer)

    Max Dupain, Australian photographer who developed an influential style of commercial photography that emphasized the geometric forms of his architectural and industrial subjects. Dupain, who exhibited his first landscape photographs while attending grammar school, studied at the East Sydney

  • Dupanloup, Félix-Antoine-Philibert (bishop of Orléans)

    Félix-Antoine-Philibert Dupanloup, Roman Catholic bishop of Orléans who was a clerical spokesman for the liberal wing of French Catholicism during the mid-19th century. Ordained priest in 1825, Dupanloup began his series of successful catechetical classes at the Parisian Church of the Madeleine. As

  • Duparc, Henri (French composer)

    Henri Duparc, French composer known for his original and lasting songs on poems of Charles Baudelaire, Leconte de Lisle, Théophile Gautier, and others. Duparc studied with César Franck at the Jesuit College of Vaugirard. In 1869 he met Franz Liszt and Richard Wagner at Weimar and in 1870 published

  • Duparc, Marie-Eugène-Henri (French composer)

    Henri Duparc, French composer known for his original and lasting songs on poems of Charles Baudelaire, Leconte de Lisle, Théophile Gautier, and others. Duparc studied with César Franck at the Jesuit College of Vaugirard. In 1869 he met Franz Liszt and Richard Wagner at Weimar and in 1870 published

  • dupatta (clothing)

    Pakistan: Daily life and social customs: …a light shawl called a dupatta. Among conservative Muslim communities, women sometimes wear the burqa, a full-length garment that may or may not cover the face. In earlier generations, the fez hat was popular among Muslim men, but more often the woolen, boat-shaped Karakul hat (popularized by Mohammed Ali Jinnah)…

  • Duperron, Jacques Davy (French cardinal)

    Jacques Davy Duperron, French cardinal, remembered especially for his part in the conversion of King Henry IV of France to Roman Catholicism. The son of a Huguenot refugee from Saint-L?, Normandy, who gave him an excellent humanist education, he returned to France in 1562 and was introduced to

  • Dupes, Day of the (French history)

    France: Louis XIII: …in 1630, came the notorious Day of Dupes (November 10), when the queen mother, now allied with Gaston and the keeper of the seals, Michel de Marillac, prepared to move against Richelieu. After initially agreeing to the cardinal’s dismissal, the king recovered and chose to support Richelieu against the wishes…

  • Dupetor flavicollis (bird)

    bittern: Somewhat larger is the black mangrove bittern (I. flavicollis), of southeastern Asia and Australia. This species shows plumelike development of the crown and neck feathers and is sometimes separated as Dupetor. For information on tiger bitterns, or tiger herons, see heron.

  • Dupin, Aurore (French novelist)

    George Sand, French Romantic writer known primarily for her so-called rustic novels. She was brought up at Nohant, near La Chatre in Berry, the country home of her grandmother. There she gained the profound love and understanding of the countryside that were to inform most of her works. In 1817 she

  • Dupin, C. Auguste (fictional character)

    C. Auguste Dupin, fictional detective appearing in three stories by Edgar Allan Poe. Dupin was the original model for the detective in literature. Based on the roguish Fran?ois-Eugène Vidocq, onetime criminal and founder and chief of the French police detective organization S?reté, Dupin is a Paris

  • Dupin, Louis Ellies (French historian)

    Louis Ellies Dupin, French church historian whose history of Christian literature, Nouvelle Bibliothèque des auteurs ecclésiastiques, 58 vol. (1686–1704; “New Library of Ecclesiastical Writers”), broke with scholastic tradition by treating biography, literary and doctrinal criticism, and

  • duple metre (music)

    metre: Simple metres are duple (e.g., 22, 24), triple (34, 38), or quadruple (44, 48). Compound metres are also duple (68, 616

  • duple time (music)

    metre: Simple metres are duple (e.g., 22, 24), triple (34, 38), or quadruple (44, 48). Compound metres are also duple (68, 616

  • Dupleix, Joseph-Fran?ois (French colonial official)

    Joseph-Fran?ois Dupleix, colonial administrator and governor-general of the French territories in India, who nearly realized his dream of establishing a French empire in India. His father, Fran?ois, a director of the French East India Company, sent Dupleix on a voyage to India and America in 1715.

  • Duplessis, Claude Thomas (French goldsmith)

    pottery: Porcelain: …bronze by the court goldsmith, Claude Thomas Duplessis, and others. Meissen was also copied for a short period, but the factory soon evolved its own style, which remained partly dependent on the use of high quality gilt-bronze mounts. A few glazed and painted figures were made, but these gave place…

  • Duplessis, Marie (French courtesan)

    La traviata: Background and context: …“lady of pleasure” (the scandalous Marie Duplessis) whom he had known and adored. Like Violetta in the opera, Duplessis had conquered Parisian society with her wit, charm, and beauty, but her reign was a brief one—she died of tuberculosis in 1847 at age 23. Verdi attended the play in 1852…

  • Duplessis, Maurice Le Noblet (Canadian politician)

    Maurice Le Noblet Duplessis, Canadian politician who controlled Quebec’s provincial government as its premier from 1936 until his death, except for the war years of 1940–44. Educated at Notre Dame and Laval universities in Montreal, Duplessis was admitted to the bar in 1913 and made King’s Counsel

  • Duplessis-Mornay, Philippe (French diplomat)

    Philippe de Mornay, seigneur du Plessis-Marly, French diplomat who was one of the most outspoken and well-known publicists for the Protestant cause during the French Wars of Religion (1562–98). Mornay received a Protestant education, studying Hebrew, law, and German at the University of Heidelberg.

  • duplex burner (device)

    kerosene lamp: In 1865 the duplex burner, with two flat wicks set near each other to augment the heat and brilliance of their flames, was introduced. In Europe, Argand burners with cylindrical wicks were widely used. See also Argand burner; lamp.

  • duplex circuit

    telegraph: Signal processing and transmission: …States completed refinement of the duplex transmission system originated in Germany by Wilhelm Gintl, which allowed the same line to be used simultaneously for sending and receiving, thus doubling its capacity. This system was further improved by the American inventor Thomas Alva Edison, who patented a quadraplex telegraph system in…

  • Duplex Drive tank (United States military weapon)

    Sherman tank: …famous variation was the “Duplex Drive,” or DD, tank, a Sherman equipped with extendable and collapsible skirts that made it buoyant enough to be launched from a landing craft and make its way to shore under propeller power. The M4 also was transformed into the M32 Tank Recovery vehicle…

  • Duplex Printing Press Co. v. Deering (law case)

    Mahlon Pitney: Mitchell (1917) and Duplex Printing Press Co. v. Deering (1921), which limited the rights of workers to collective bargaining, were elaborations of his earlier opinion in Coppage v. Kansas, in which the court struck down a Kansas statute prohibiting an employer from preventing union membership among his employees…

  • duplex scanning (medicine)

    ultrasonics: Diagnosis: …and Doppler imaging, known as duplex scanning, can identify arteries and immediately measure their blood flow; this has been extensively used to diagnose heart valve defects.

  • duplex stainless steel (metallurgy)

    stainless steel: Duplex stainless steels are a combination of austenitic and ferritic stainless steels in equal amounts; they contain 21 to 27 percent chromium, 1.35 to 8 percent nickel, 0.05 to 3 percent copper, and 0.05 to 5 percent molybdenum. Duplex stainless steels are stronger and more…

  • duplex uterus (anatomy)

    mammal: The female tract: A duplex uterus characterizes rodents and rabbits; the uterine horns are completely separated and have separate cervices opening into the vagina. Carnivores have a bipartite uterus, in which the horns are largely separate but enter the vagina by a single cervix. In the bicornate uterus, typical…

  • duplexer (electronic device)

    radar: A basic radar system: The duplexer permits alternate transmission and reception with the same antenna; in effect, it is a fast-acting switch that protects the sensitive receiver from the high power of the transmitter.

  • Duplicate Bridge (game)

    Duplicate Bridge, form of Contract Bridge played in all tournaments, in Bridge clubs, and often in the home; it is so called because each hand is played at least twice, although by different players, under the same conditions, with the same cards in each hand and the same dealer and v

  • duplicating machine

    Duplicating machine, a device for making duplicate copies from a master copy of printed, typed, drawn, or other material and utilizing various reproduction techniques to this end. The major types of duplicating machines are stencil (or mimeograph), hectograph, multilith (or offset lithograph), and

  • duplication (genetics)

    cell: Duplication of the genetic material: Before a cell can divide, it must accurately and completely duplicate the genetic information encoded in its DNA in order for its progeny cells to function and survive. This is a complex problem because of the great length of DNA…

  • Duplicity (film by Gilroy [2009])

    Julia Roberts: …Fireflies in the Garden (2008); Duplicity (2009), in which she played a corporate spy; and the romantic comedy Valentine’s Day (2010).

  • DUPLO (toy brand)

    LEGO: …the company started selling the DUPLO line of larger bricks for young children who had trouble handling the regular LEGO bricks. Nine years later LEGO introduced Minifigures, the typically smiling yellow humanoids that became regular presences in the company’s themed play sets. MINDSTORMS products, which centre on a programmable robotics…

  • duplum (music)

    cantus firmus: …a simple second melody (duplum) to an existing plainchant melody (the vox principalis, or principal voice), which by the end of the 12th century was stretched so as to accommodate a melody. The 13th-century polyphonic motet, for its part, featured the plainchant cantus firmus in the tenor. (“Tenor” derives…

  • DuPont Circle (neighborhood, Washington, District of Columbia, United States)

    Washington, D.C.: Dupont Circle: The Dupont Circle neighbourhood is situated northeast of Georgetown and surrounds Dupont Circle, a park centred at the intersection of five streets: Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts avenues and 19th and P streets. The area had been a neglected marshland until after the Civil…

  • DuPont Company (American company)

    DuPont Company, American corporation engaged primarily in biotechnology and the manufacture of chemicals and pharmaceuticals. The company was founded by éleuthère Irénée du Pont (1771–1834) in Delaware in 1802 to produce black powder and later other explosives, which remained the company’s main

  • Dupont, Pierre (French general)

    Peninsular War: …repulsed from Valencia, and General Pierre Dupont, who had advanced into Andalusia, was compelled to retreat and ultimately to capitulate with all his army at Bailén (July 23). The Spaniards now advanced upon the capital and expelled Joseph Bonaparte (August).

  • Duport, Adrien-Jean-Fran?ois (French magistrate)

    Adrien Duport, French magistrate who was a leading constitutional monarchist during the early stages of the French Revolution of 1789. A prominent member of the Parlement of Paris (one of the high courts of justice), Duport was elected for the nobility to the Estates-General of 1789. On June 25 he

  • Duport, Louis (French dancer)

    Louis Duport, French ballet dancer who refined classical technique, excelling particularly in multiple pirouettes and high, soaring leaps. Duport was a child prodigy dancer and violinist. He danced in Paris from 1799 to 1806 and challenged Auguste Vestris’s supremacy as leading male dancer at the

  • Duport, Louis-Antoine (French dancer)

    Louis Duport, French ballet dancer who refined classical technique, excelling particularly in multiple pirouettes and high, soaring leaps. Duport was a child prodigy dancer and violinist. He danced in Paris from 1799 to 1806 and challenged Auguste Vestris’s supremacy as leading male dancer at the

  • Duppa, B. F. (British chemist)

    Sir William Henry Perkin: In 1858 he and B.F. Duppa synthesized glycine in the first laboratory preparation of an amino acid. They synthesized tartaric acid in 1860. After Graebe and Liebermann announced their synthesis of the red dye alizarin, Perkin developed a cheaper procedure, obtained a patent for his process, and held a…

  • Duppa, Darrell (American pioneer)

    Phoenix: European arrivals: …and early town civic leader, Darrell Duppa. He chose the name Phoenix, giving the explanation, “A new city will spring phoenix-like upon the ruins of a former civilization.”

  • Dupplin Moor, Battle of (English history)

    Battle of Dupplin Moor, (Aug. 12, 1332), battle fought about 7 miles (11 km) southeast of Perth, Perthshire, a victory for Edward de Balliol, a claimant to the Scottish throne, over forces led by Donald, earl of Mar, regent for the young King David II. Secretly encouraged by King Edward III of

  • Duprat, Antoine (French chancellor and cardinal)

    Antoine Duprat, chancellor of France and cardinal known for his service as one of Francis I’s most trusted advisers. Educated as a lawyer, Duprat began his government service as a judge in 1490 and served as attorney in the Parlement of Toulouse in 1495. Later he became a master of requests (in

  • Dupré, Giovanni (Italian sculptor)

    Giovanni Dupré, Italian sculptor whose success was due to his lifelike and original interpretation of form when Italian sculpture was deteriorating into a mannered imitation of the works of Antonio Canova. Dupré was the son of a carver in wood. His first work of importance was a marble “Abel”

  • Dupré, Guillaume (French artisan)

    medal: France: Guillaume Dupré (1574–1647) followed Pilon, charmed Henry IV with his portrait medals, and was appointed in 1604 “conducteur et contr?leur général” of the Paris Mint. Nicolas Briot (1579–1646), rival of Dupré, was a lesser master who was a skilled mechanic and engraver general at the…

  • Dupré, Jean (French printer)

    history of publishing: France: …the early French printers were Jean Dupré, a businessman publisher of éditions de luxe (“luxury editions”), who set up in 1481, and Antoine Vérard, who began printing in 1485. Vérard was the first to print a Book of Hours, a book containing the prayers or offices appointed to be said…

  • Dupré, Jules (French artist)

    Jules Dupré, French artist who was one of the leaders of the Barbizon group of landscape painters. The son of a porcelain manufacturer, Dupré started his career in his father’s works, after which he painted porcelain at his uncle’s china factory at Sèvres. He first exhibited paintings in 1831 and

  • Dupré, Louis (French dancer)

    Vestris family: Gaétan Vestris: He succeeded the celebrated Louis Dupré, who had long been acclaimed as the exemplar of the noble style that traced its origins to the court ballets of the previous century. Vestris, however, a Florentine by birth, brought to his performance a somewhat more flamboyant flavour, while respecting the traditional…

  • Dupré, Louise (Canadian author)

    Canadian literature: Contemporary trends: Similarly, Louise Dupré established her reputation as a poet before writing the well-received novel La Mémoria (1996; Memoria). Suzanne Jacob has excelled in poetry with La Part de feu (1997; “The Fire’s Share”) and in fiction with the novel Laura Laur (1983). Although poetry no longer…

  • Dupré, Marcel (French musician)

    Marcel Dupré, foremost French organ virtuoso of his time, famed for his ability to improvise and influential as a teacher. Dupré gave his first organ recital at age 10 and had his oratorio Le Songe de Jacob (Jacob’s Dream) performed at 15. An organist at Saint-Sulpice and Notre-Dame, Paris, he gave

  • Dupré, Marie-Jules (French naval officer)

    Marie-Jules Dupré, French naval officer who served as governor of French Cochinchina (southern Vietnam) in 1871–74. Despite official policy opposing imperialistic expansion, Dupré attempted to establish French dominance in Tonkin (northern Vietnam) with the hope of promoting trade and of finding a

  • Dupree (ballad)

    ballad: Outlaws and badmen: …sadistic bullies (“Stagolee”), robbers (“Dupree”), or pathological killers (“Sam Bass,” “Billy the Kid”) comments on the folk’s hostile attitude toward the church, constabulary, banks, and railroads. The kindly, law-abiding, devout, enduring steel driver “John Henry” is a rarity among ballad heroes.

  • Dupree, Cornell Luther, Jr. (American musician)

    Cornell Luther Dupree, Jr., American guitarist and bandleader (born Dec. 19, 1942, Fort Worth, Texas—died May 8, 2011, Fort Worth), contributed a rich, distinctive sound as an in-demand session guitarist for numerous performers, especially throughout the 1960s and ’70s; he claimed to have

  • Duprene (chemical compound)

    Neoprene (CR), synthetic rubber produced by the polymerization (or linking together of single molecules into giant, multiple-unit molecules) of chloroprene. A good general-purpose rubber, neoprene is valued for its high tensile strength, resilience, oil and flame resistance, and resistance to

  • Duprez, Gilbert (French musician)

    Gilbert Duprez, French tenor, teacher of voice, and composer. Duprez studied at the Paris Conservatory. In 1825 he made his debut at the Odéon Theatre, Paris, as Almaviva in Gioachino Rossini’s Il barbiere di Siviglia (The Barber of Seville). After limited success at the Odéon, he went to Italy for

  • Duprez, Gilbert-Louis (French musician)

    Gilbert Duprez, French tenor, teacher of voice, and composer. Duprez studied at the Paris Conservatory. In 1825 he made his debut at the Odéon Theatre, Paris, as Almaviva in Gioachino Rossini’s Il barbiere di Siviglia (The Barber of Seville). After limited success at the Odéon, he went to Italy for

  • Dupuis, Jean (French trader)

    Jean Dupuis, French adventurer, trader, and publicist who was associated with the unsuccessful effort to establish French influence in northern Vietnam in 1873. Dupuis began his commercial career in Egypt in 1858 but in 1860 moved to China, where he established himself first in Shanghai and, a year

  • Dupuit, Arsène-Jules-étienne-Juvénal (French engineer)

    Arsène-Jules-étienne-Juvénal Dupuit, French engineer and economist who was one of the first to analyze the cost-effectiveness of public works. Dupuit studied at the école Polytechnique (Polytechnic School) in Paris and then joined the civil-engineering corps, rising to the rank of inspector general

  • Dupuy, Aimé (French author)

    children's literature: Overview: …(1931) of a study by Aimé Dupuy, translatable as The Child: A New Character in the French Novel.

  • Dupuy, Charles-Alexandre (French politician)

    Charles-Alexandre Dupuy, French political figure whose governments during the period of the Dreyfus Affair failed to cope successfully with critical issues arising from the political and social tensions that emerged during the long controversy. A philosophy professor before his election to the

  • Dupuy, Pierre (French historian and librarian)

    Pierre Dupuy, historian and librarian to King Louis XIV of France. He was first to catalog the royal archives (Trésor des chartes) and, with his brother Jacques, the king’s library. Little is known of Dupuy’s life except that he travelled with his brothers all over France and amassed a collection

  • Dupuytren’s contracture

    Dupuytren’s contracture, flexion deformity of the hands caused by thickening of the fascia, or fibrous connective tissue, of the palm. The proliferation of connective tissue causes the tendons of one or more fingers to shorten and tighten, leaving the finger permanently flexed. Disability may be

  • Dupuytren, Guillaume, Baron (French surgeon and pathologist)

    Guillaume, Baron Dupuytren, French surgeon and pathologist best known for his description and development of surgical procedures for alleviating “Dupuytren’s contracture” (1832), in which fibrosis of deep tissues of the palm causes permanent retraction of one or more fingers. In 1802 Dupuytren

  • Duque de Bragan?a Falls (waterfall, Angola)

    Malanje: …for its 350-foot- (107-metre-) high Duque de Bragan?a Falls on the Lucala River; the Luando Game Reserve in the south; the Milando animal reserve in the north; and the Pungo Andongo stones, giant black monoliths associated with tribal legend. Most of the region’s inhabitants are members of the Mbundu peoples.…

  • Duque de Caxias (Brazil)

    Duque de Caxias, city, Rio de Janeiro estado (state), southeastern Brazil. It is a suburb of the city of Rio de Janeiro. Until 1931 it was known as Meriti Station, and from 1931 to 1943 it was Caxias. It became the seat of the district of Caxias in 1931 and seat of the municipality of Duque de

  • Duque de Estrada, Diego (Spanish soldier)

    Diego Duque de Estrada, Spanish soldier and adventurer. The son of a soldier of rank, he was left an orphan when very young and was educated by a cousin. While still young he was betrothed to his cousin’s daughter. One night he found an intruder in the house, a gentleman with whom he was

  • Duque Márquez, Iván (president of Colombia)

    Iván Duque, Colombian centre-right politician, lawyer, and author who became president of Colombia in 2018. He succeeded Juan Manuel Santos, his first political patron, as president but was an acolyte of another former president, álvaro Uribe Vélez, who handpicked Duque as the presidential

  • Duque, El (Cuban baseball player)

    Orlando Hernández, Cuban baseball pitcher who amassed a won-lost record of 129–47, the best winning percentage in the history of the Cuban League. After defecting from Cuba in 1997, he pitched in the major leagues, where he gained a reputation as a “big game” pitcher, posting a 9–3 record and a

  • Duque, Iván (president of Colombia)

    Iván Duque, Colombian centre-right politician, lawyer, and author who became president of Colombia in 2018. He succeeded Juan Manuel Santos, his first political patron, as president but was an acolyte of another former president, álvaro Uribe Vélez, who handpicked Duque as the presidential

  • Duque, Pedro (Spanish aeronautical engineer and astronaut)

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