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  • Dunántúl (region, Hungary)

    Transdanubia, region, that part of Hungary lying west of the Danube River, which flows north-south across the middle of the country. Both the English and the Hungarian versions of the name mean “land beyond the Danube.” Transdanubia is not uniform as a region, and it consists essentially of a

  • Dun?rea (river, Europe)

    Danube River, river, the second longest in Europe after the Volga. It rises in the Black Forest mountains of western Germany and flows for some 1,770 miles (2,850 km) to its mouth on the Black Sea. Along its course it passes through 10 countries: Germany, Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia,

  • Dunash ben Labrat (Hebrew poet)

    Dunash Ben Labrat, Hebrew poet, grammarian, and polemicist who was the first to use Arabic metres in his verse, thus inaugurating a new mode in Hebrew poetry. His strictures on the Hebrew lexicon of Menahem ben Saruq provoked a quarrel that helped initiate a golden age in Hebrew philology. Dunash

  • Dunash ben Librat (Hebrew poet)

    Dunash Ben Labrat, Hebrew poet, grammarian, and polemicist who was the first to use Arabic metres in his verse, thus inaugurating a new mode in Hebrew poetry. His strictures on the Hebrew lexicon of Menahem ben Saruq provoked a quarrel that helped initiate a golden age in Hebrew philology. Dunash

  • Dunash ben Tamim (Jewish physician)

    Dunash Ben Tamim, Jewish physician and one of the first scholars to make a comparative study of the Hebrew and Arabic languages. He practiced medicine at the Fā?imid court of al-Qayrawān, (now in Tunisia) and, like other educated Jews of his time, was versed in Hebrew. The work for which he is b

  • Dunaszerdahely (town, Slovakia)

    Dunajská Streda, town, southwestern Slovakia, on the highway and railway line between Bratislava and Komárno. Dunajská Streda is located at the geographical centre of Great Rye Island (the Slovakian portion of the alluvial plain of the Danube River) and is surrounded by fertile land. There is

  • Dunaújváros (Hungary)

    Fejér: …major cities and towns include Dunaújváros, Bicske, Gárdony, Mór, and Sárbogárd. The presence of the Danube River along much of the county’s eastern border contributes to Fejér’s standing as an important transportation hub.

  • Dunav (river, Europe)

    Danube River, river, the second longest in Europe after the Volga. It rises in the Black Forest mountains of western Germany and flows for some 1,770 miles (2,850 km) to its mouth on the Black Sea. Along its course it passes through 10 countries: Germany, Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia,

  • Dunaway, Dennis (American musician)

    Alice Cooper: 19, 1997, Mason City, Iowa), Dennis Dunaway (b. Dec. 9, 1946, Cottage Grove, Ore.), and Neal Smith (b. Sept. 23, 1947, Akron).

  • Dunaway, Dorothy Faye (American actress)

    Faye Dunaway, American actress known for her tense, absorbing performances. She enjoyed early success on the stage and then gained international stardom for her work in films. Initially studying to become a teacher, Dunaway entered the University of Florida in Gainesville on a teaching scholarship,

  • Dunaway, Faye (American actress)

    Faye Dunaway, American actress known for her tense, absorbing performances. She enjoyed early success on the stage and then gained international stardom for her work in films. Initially studying to become a teacher, Dunaway entered the University of Florida in Gainesville on a teaching scholarship,

  • Dunay (river, Europe)

    Danube River, river, the second longest in Europe after the Volga. It rises in the Black Forest mountains of western Germany and flows for some 1,770 miles (2,850 km) to its mouth on the Black Sea. Along its course it passes through 10 countries: Germany, Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia,

  • Dunbar (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Dunbar, royal burgh (town) and fishing port, East Lothian council area and historic county, southeastern Scotland, on the southern shore of the Firth of Forth. Dunbar Castle, built about 856, was an important stronghold against English invasion, and the town developed under its protection. It was

  • Dunbar Cave (cave, Clarksville, Tennessee, United States)

    Clarksville: Dunbar Cave State Natural Area, immediately northeast, has cave tours and a small museum. Near the town of Dover, about 30 miles (50 km) west, is Fort Donelson National Battlefield, the site on which forces under General Ulysses S. Grant won the first major Union…

  • Dunbar Nelson, Alice (American author)

    Alice Dunbar Nelson, novelist, poet, essayist, and critic associated with the early period of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and ’30s. The daughter of a Creole seaman and a black seamstress, Moore grew up in New Orleans, where she completed a two-year teacher-training program at Straight

  • Dunbar Nelson, Alice Ruth (American author)

    Alice Dunbar Nelson, novelist, poet, essayist, and critic associated with the early period of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and ’30s. The daughter of a Creole seaman and a black seamstress, Moore grew up in New Orleans, where she completed a two-year teacher-training program at Straight

  • Dunbar, Battle of (British history)

    Battle of Dunbar, (September 3, 1650), decisive engagement in the English Civil Wars, in which English troops commanded by Oliver Cromwell defeated the Scottish army under David Leslie, thereby opening Scotland to 10 years of English occupation and rule. The execution of Charles I, king of England,

  • Dunbar, Patrick, 2nd Earl of March, 9th Earl of Dunbar (Scottish noble)

    Patrick Dunbar, 2nd earl of March, Scottish noble prominent during the reigns of the Bruces Robert I and David II. He gave refuge to Edward II of England after the Battle of Bannockburn and contrived his escape by sea to England. Later, he made peace with Robert de Bruce and by him was appointed

  • Dunbar, Paul Laurence (American writer)

    Paul Laurence Dunbar, U.S. author whose reputation rests upon his verse and short stories written in black dialect. He was the first black writer in the U.S. to make a concerted attempt to live by his writings and one of the first to attain national prominence. Both of Dunbar’s parents were former

  • Dunbar, William (Scottish poet)

    William Dunbar, Middle Scots poet attached to the court of James IV who was the dominant figure among the Scottish Chaucerians (see makar) in the golden age of Scottish poetry. He was probably of the family of the earls of Dunbar and March and may have received an M.A. degree from St. Andrews in

  • Dunbarton (former county, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Dunbartonshire, historic county of west-central Scotland, northwest and northeast of Glasgow. It comprises two sections: the main body of the county in the west, extending along the north bank of the River Clyde from the outskirts of Glasgow to Loch Long, and a smaller detached area in the east

  • Dunbartonshire (former county, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Dunbartonshire, historic county of west-central Scotland, northwest and northeast of Glasgow. It comprises two sections: the main body of the county in the west, extending along the north bank of the River Clyde from the outskirts of Glasgow to Loch Long, and a smaller detached area in the east

  • Dunblane school massacre (school shooting, Dunblane, Scotland, United Kingdom [1996])

    Dunblane school massacre, event on March 13, 1996, in which a gunman invaded a primary school in the small Scottish town of Dunblane and shot to death 16 young children and their teacher before turning a gun on himself. The gunman, Thomas Hamilton, lived in the town. On the day of the massacre, he

  • Dunblane, Thomas Osborne, Viscount of (English statesman)

    Thomas Osborne, 1st duke of Leeds, English statesman who, while chief minister to King Charles II, organized the Tories in Parliament. In addition he played a key role in bringing William and Mary to the English throne in 1689. The son of a Royalist Yorkshire landowner, Osborne did not become

  • Dunboyne (racehorse)

    Sir Barton: Breeding and early years: …finish line second only to Dunboyne with a surging burst of speed, even though he had been boxed in until the last furlong. Nevertheless, the 1918 season ended without a victory for Sir Barton.

  • Duncan (Michigan, United States)

    Cheboygan, city, seat (1853) of Cheboygan county, northern Michigan, U.S. The city lies along the Cheboygan River as it enters Lake Huron near the eastern end of the Straits of Mackinac. According to some reports, the site was a Native American camping ground until it was settled by Jacob Sammons

  • Duncan (fictional character)

    Duncan, fictional character, the Scottish king who is murdered by Macbeth, one of his generals, in William Shakespeare’s Macbeth (written 1606–07, published

  • Duncan (Oklahoma, United States)

    Duncan, city, seat (1907) of Stephens county, south-central Oklahoma, U.S. Once a cow town on the Chisholm Trail, it was founded officially in 1892, when the Rock Island Railroad reached the site. It was named for William Duncan, a pioneer trader and tailor from Fort Sill. After the discovery of

  • Duncan I (king of the Scots)

    Duncan I, king of the Scots from 1034 to 1040. Duncan was the grandson of King Malcolm II (ruled 1005–34), who irregularly made him ruler of Strathclyde when that region was absorbed into the Scottish kingdom (probably shortly before 1034). Malcolm violated the established system of succession

  • Duncan II (king of Scotland)

    Duncan II, king of Scotland (1093–94), son of Malcolm III and grandson of Duncan I. For many years (1072?–87) Duncan lived as a hostage of the Norman English, allegedly as a confirmation of his father’s homage to William I of England. He became king of the Scots while driving out his uncle, Donald

  • Duncan Island (island, Galápagos Islands, Ecuador)

    Pinzón Island, one of the Galápagos Islands, in the eastern Pacific Ocean, about 600 miles (965 km) west of Ecuador. It has an area of about 7 square miles (18 square km) and is flanked on the west by five small islets known as Guy Fawkes Island. The island’s relief is made up of cactus-studded

  • Duncan Smith, George Iain (British politician)

    Iain Duncan Smith, British politician who served as leader of the Conservative Party (2001–03) and as work and pensions secretary in the cabinet of Prime Minister David Cameron (2010–16). Duncan Smith, whose father was a Royal Air Force pilot during World War II, was educated privately, and for a

  • Duncan Smith, Iain (British politician)

    Iain Duncan Smith, British politician who served as leader of the Conservative Party (2001–03) and as work and pensions secretary in the cabinet of Prime Minister David Cameron (2010–16). Duncan Smith, whose father was a Royal Air Force pilot during World War II, was educated privately, and for a

  • Duncan v. Louisiana (law case)

    jury: History and use: …state, but, in 1968 in Duncan v. Louisiana, the United States Supreme Court ruled that a jury trial is a constitutional right in all criminal cases in which the penalty may exceed six months’ imprisonment. In civil cases its constitutional status is more various, but jury trial generally is available…

  • Duncan, Angela (American dancer)

    Isadora Duncan, American dancer whose teaching and performances helped to free ballet from its conservative restrictions and presaged the development of modern expressive dance. She was among the first to raise interpretive dance to the status of creative art. Although Duncan’s birth date is

  • Duncan, Arne (American education administrator)

    Education: The “Great Equalizer”: …Mann set out more than a century ago.

  • Duncan, David (American accountant)

    Arthur Andersen: The Enron Audit: …auditing and consulting services, and David Duncan, the lead auditor, had an annual performance goal of 20% increase in sales. Duncan favorably reviewed the work of Rick Causey, Enron’s chief accounting officer and Duncan’s former colleague at Andersen. Duncan let Enron employees intimidate Andersen auditors, such as locking an Andersen…

  • Duncan, David Douglas (American photojournalist)

    David Douglas Duncan, American photojournalist noted for his dramatic combat photographs of the Korean War. After graduating in 1938 from the University of Miami in Florida, Duncan worked as a freelance photographer. During World War II he served with the U.S. Marine Corps, photographing aviation

  • Duncan, Edward Howard (American poet)

    Robert Duncan, American poet, a leader of the Black Mountain group of poets in the 1950s. Duncan attended the University of California, Berkeley, in 1936–38 and 1948–50. He edited the Experimental Review from 1938 to 1940 and traveled widely thereafter, lecturing on poetry in the United States and

  • Duncan, Isadora (American dancer)

    Isadora Duncan, American dancer whose teaching and performances helped to free ballet from its conservative restrictions and presaged the development of modern expressive dance. She was among the first to raise interpretive dance to the status of creative art. Although Duncan’s birth date is

  • Duncan, John H. (American architect)

    General Grant National Memorial: It was designed by John H. Duncan. The monument, 150 feet (46 m) high in gray granite, was erected at a cost of $600,000 raised by public contributions. It was dedicated April 27, 1897, and made a national memorial in 1959. The memorial is a combination of several classical…

  • Duncan, Martin (American astronomer)

    comet: The modern era: In 1988 American astronomer Martin Duncan and Canadian astronomers Thomas Quinn and Scott Tremaine built a more complex computer simulation of the trans-Neptunian comet belt and again showed that it was the likely source of the short-period comets. They also proposed that the belt be named in honour of…

  • Duncan, Otis Dudley (American sociologist)

    Otis Dudley Duncan, American sociologist whose study of the black population of Chicago (1957) demonstrated early in his career the validity of human ecology as an extension of the discipline of sociology. Duncan received a B.A. from Louisiana State University (1941), an M.A. from the University of

  • Duncan, Renault Renaldo (Romanian-born American actor)

    Duncan Renaldo, actor who was best known for his role in the popular western television series The Cisco Kid (1951–56). Renaldo, who was an orphan, was uncertain of his origins. Romania and Spain have been proposed as his birthplace, and his birth date is likewise customary rather than factual. He

  • Duncan, Robert (American poet)

    Robert Duncan, American poet, a leader of the Black Mountain group of poets in the 1950s. Duncan attended the University of California, Berkeley, in 1936–38 and 1948–50. He edited the Experimental Review from 1938 to 1940 and traveled widely thereafter, lecturing on poetry in the United States and

  • Duncan, Robert (American Anglican clergyman)

    Robert Duncan, American Anglican clergyman who was the first archbishop and primate of the Anglican Church in North America, serving from 2009 to 2014. Duncan was raised in Bordentown, New Jersey, and attended Bordentown Military Institute, where he was valedictorian of his class in 1966. He

  • Duncan, Robert Edward (American poet)

    Robert Duncan, American poet, a leader of the Black Mountain group of poets in the 1950s. Duncan attended the University of California, Berkeley, in 1936–38 and 1948–50. He edited the Experimental Review from 1938 to 1940 and traveled widely thereafter, lecturing on poetry in the United States and

  • Duncan, Robert Todd (American singer)

    Todd Duncan, American baritone who was the first to perform the role of Porgy in George Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess, was the first black to sing with the New York City Opera, and was a noted teacher and recitalist; he presented some 2,000 recitals in 56 countries during his 25-year career (b. Feb.

  • Duncan, Robert William (American Anglican clergyman)

    Robert Duncan, American Anglican clergyman who was the first archbishop and primate of the Anglican Church in North America, serving from 2009 to 2014. Duncan was raised in Bordentown, New Jersey, and attended Bordentown Military Institute, where he was valedictorian of his class in 1966. He

  • Duncan, Ronald (British author)

    Ronald Duncan, British playwright, poet, and man of letters whose verse plays express the contrast between traditional religious faith and the materialism and skepticism of modern times. From an early interest in socialism, Duncan moved to the expression of Christian and Buddhist convictions in his

  • Duncan, Ronald Frederick Henry (British author)

    Ronald Duncan, British playwright, poet, and man of letters whose verse plays express the contrast between traditional religious faith and the materialism and skepticism of modern times. From an early interest in socialism, Duncan moved to the expression of Christian and Buddhist convictions in his

  • Duncan, Sara Jeannette (Canadian author)

    Canadian literature: Modern period, 1900–60: …mentality” provided the setting for Sara Jeannette Duncan’s portrayal of political life in The Imperialist (1904), Ralph Connor’s The Man from Glengarry (1901), Stephen Leacock’s satiric stories Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town (1912), and Mazo de la Roche’s best-selling Jalna series (1927–60). Out of the Prairies emerged the novel…

  • Duncan, Tim (American basketball player)

    Tim Duncan, American collegiate and professional basketball player who led the San Antonio Spurs of the National Basketball Association (NBA) to five championships (1999, 2003, 2005, 2007, and 2014). In his youth, Duncan excelled in freestyle swimming and had hopes of participating in the Olympics

  • Duncan, Timothy Theodore (American basketball player)

    Tim Duncan, American collegiate and professional basketball player who led the San Antonio Spurs of the National Basketball Association (NBA) to five championships (1999, 2003, 2005, 2007, and 2014). In his youth, Duncan excelled in freestyle swimming and had hopes of participating in the Olympics

  • Duncan, Todd (American singer)

    Todd Duncan, American baritone who was the first to perform the role of Porgy in George Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess, was the first black to sing with the New York City Opera, and was a noted teacher and recitalist; he presented some 2,000 recitals in 56 countries during his 25-year career (b. Feb.

  • Duncan-Sandys, Duncan Edwin, Baron Duncan-Sandys (British politician and statesman)

    Duncan Sandys, British politician and statesman who exerted major influence on foreign and domestic policy during mid-20th-century Conservative administrations. The son of a member of Parliament, Sandys was first elected to Parliament as a Conservative in 1935. He became a close ally of his

  • Duncansboro (Vermont, United States)

    Newport, city, seat of Orleans county, northern Vermont, U.S., at the south end of Lake Memphremagog, near the Canadian border. The first house in the settlement (originally called Duncansboro) was built in 1793 by Deacon Martin Adams. The name Newport was adopted in 1816. Newport town (township;

  • Duncanson, Robert S. (American painter)

    luminism: …as George Loring Brown and Robert S. Duncanson adopted certain characteristics of the luminists and therefore are sometimes classified with them. Many untrained, or naive, painters, especially those of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, were influenced by elements of luminism such as its hard linearism, depth, and clear…

  • Dunciad, The (poem by Pope)

    The Dunciad, poem by Alexander Pope, first published anonymously in three books in 1728; by 1743, when it appeared in its final form, it had grown to four books. Written largely in iambic pentameter, the poem is a masterpiece of mock-heroic verse. After Pope had edited the works of William

  • Dundalk (Ireland)

    Dundalk, seaport, urban district, and administrative centre of County Louth, extreme northeastern Ireland. It lies near the mouth of the Castletown River on Dundalk Bay, about 45 miles (70 km) north of Dublin. Dundalk received charters from King John about 1200 and later from other monarchs. During

  • Dündar, Felekuddin (Turkmen ruler)

    Hamid Dynasty: It was founded by Felekuddin Dündar, whose father, Ilyas, was a frontier ruler under the Seljuqs and who named it after his grandfather; Dündar governed the Hamid principality jointly with his brother Yunus, with two capitals, one at E?ridir and one at Antalya (Attalia). Dündar was defeated and killed…

  • Dundas, Henry (British politician)

    Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville, British careerist politician who held various ministerial offices under William Pitt the Younger and whose adroit control of Scottish politics earned him the nickname “King Harry the Ninth.” Educated at the University of Edinburgh, he became a member of the

  • Dundee (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Dundee, major industrial city, royal burgh, and seaport of eastern Scotland. Dundee is the fourth largest city of Scotland by population. It constitutes the council area of Dundee City in the historic county of Angus. About 40 miles (64 km) north of Edinburgh, it is situated on the northern bank of

  • Dundee, Angelo (American boxing trainer)

    Angelo Dundee, American professional boxing trainer and manager, brother of boxing promoter Chris Dundee. Dundee learned boxing by studying the techniques of world-renowned trainers at Stillman’s Gym in New York City. The first world champion Dundee trained was Carmen Basilio, who held the

  • Dundee, Chris (American boxing promoter)

    Chris Dundee, American fight promoter who was responsible for the rise of Miami Beach, Fla., as a boxing centre; the eight world championship fights he promoted during his six-decade-long career included the world heavyweight bout in which Cassius Clay (now Muhammad Ali) knocked out Sonny Liston to

  • Dundee, John Graham of Claverhouse, 1st Viscount of (Scottish soldier)

    John Graham of Claverhouse, 1st viscount of Dundee, Scottish soldier, known as “Bonnie Dundee,” who in 1689 led an uprising in support of the deposed Roman Catholic monarch James II of Great Britain. Graham’s death at the outset of the revolt deprived the Scottish Jacobites, as James’s adherents

  • Dundee, John Graham of Claverhouse, 1st Viscount of, Lord Graham of Claverhouse (Scottish soldier)

    John Graham of Claverhouse, 1st viscount of Dundee, Scottish soldier, known as “Bonnie Dundee,” who in 1689 led an uprising in support of the deposed Roman Catholic monarch James II of Great Britain. Graham’s death at the outset of the revolt deprived the Scottish Jacobites, as James’s adherents

  • Dundee, University of (university, Dundee, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Dundee: The University of Dundee dates to 1881; it gained independent university status in 1967. Other educational institutions include the University of Abertay Dundee and Dundee International College. Broughty Ferry, once a separate burgh and favourite residence of wealthy Dundee merchants, is now incorporated within the city.…

  • Dunderlands (valley, Norway)

    Dunderlands, valley, along the lower course of the Rana River, north-central Norway. On the Arctic Circle, it extends about 30 miles (50 km) northeast from Rana Fjord, an inlet of the North Sea. Rich deposits of magnetite and hematite in the valley were mined to supply the ironworks and steelworks

  • Dundo (Angola)

    Dundo, mining town, northeastern Angola. It lies 15 miles (24 km) south of the Democratic Republic of the Congo border. Founded near a site where diamonds were first discovered in 1912, the town was developed as a planned community privately operated by Diamang (Companhia de Diamantes de Angola).

  • Dundo Maroje (work by Drzic)

    Croatian literature: …portraying Renaissance Dubrovnik (his comedy Dundo Maroje, first performed about 1551, played throughout western Europe); and poet Petar Hektorovi?. In the 17th and 18th centuries the leading voice belonged to Ivan Gunduli?, author of a stirring epic, Osman (oldest existing copy approximately 1651; Eng. trans. Osman), describing the Polish victory…

  • Dundo Museum (museum, Dundo, Angola)

    Dundo: …town is home to the Dundo Museum, which has extensive ethnographic collections that include wooden traditional masks and wooden sculptures of the local heterogeneous Lunda-Chokwe peoples (see also Lunda; Chokwe).

  • Dundonald, Thomas Cochrane, 10th earl of (British politician and admiral)

    Thomas Cochrane, 10th earl of Dundonald, iconoclastic British politician and admiral, who ranks among the greatest of British seamen. He was the eldest son of the 9th earl, whose scientific experiments on his Scottish estates impoverished his family. In 1793 Thomas joined the ship commanded by his

  • dundrearies (whisker style)

    dress: The 19th century: …clean-shaven, were called burnsides or sideburns, after the U.S. Civil War general Ambrose Burnside. Other popular beard styles included the imperial, a small goatee named for Napoleon III, and the side-whiskers and drooping mustache known as the Franz Joseph in honour of the head of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. After 1880…

  • Dundrennan Abbey (abbey, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Kirkcudbright: Dundrennan Abbey, 4.5 miles (7 km) southeast, was the greatest achievement of Fergus, lord of Galloway, a celebrated church builder of the 12th century. It was a Cistercian house colonized from Rievaulx Abbey and was built in 1142. There now remain only the transept and…

  • dùndún pressure drum (musical instrument)

    Dùndún pressure drum, double-membrane, hourglass-shaped drum of the Yoruba people of southwestern Nigeria. It is capable of imitating the tones and glides of the spoken language and is employed by a skilled musician to render ritual praise poetry to a deity or king. It has counterparts in East

  • Düne (island, Germany)

    Helgoland: 4 km) east, called Düne. Geological and historical evidence suggest that Helgoland and Düne are the last remnants of a single island whose periphery in ad 800 was about 120 miles (190 km). Continuous wave attack on the cliffs and a rise in sea level or fall in land…

  • Dune (film by Lynch [1984])

    David Lynch: …and direct the science-fiction epic Dune (1984), a film adaptation of the classic novel by Frank Herbert that was a critical and box-office failure. Lynch conceived, wrote, and directed Blue Velvet (1986), an unsettling and surreal mystery that was widely regarded as a masterpiece and earned him another Oscar nomination…

  • Dune (work by Herbert)

    Frank Herbert: …the publication of the epic Dune (1965), which was translated into 14 languages and sold some 12 million copies, more than any other science-fiction book in history; ironically, Dune had been rejected by 20 publishers before it was published. An abortive film version was attempted in 1975 by Chilean-French director…

  • dune blesmol (rodent)

    blesmol: …strong front claws of the dune blesmols (genus Bathyergus). The eyes are very small, and there are no external ears, only openings that are either hidden by fur or surrounded by bare or thickened skin. Blesmols have an acute sense of hearing, however, and they are very sensitive to ground…

  • dune helleborine (plant)

    helleborine: Dune helleborine (E. dunensis) grows along the sandy coasts of Great Britain and northwestern Europe. Marsh helleborine (E. palustris) is found in marshes and wet places throughout Europe. Broad-leaved helleborine (E. helleborine) is a common species in Europe and temperate Asia and has been introduced…

  • Dune II (electronic game)

    electronic strategy game: Real-time games: …the first commercial success being Dune II (1992), based on American director David Lynch’s 1984 film version of Frank Herbert’s science fiction novel Dune (1965). Dune II allowed players to select and control multiple units with their mouse for the first time, creating the control interface standard for most subsequent…

  • dune stabilization (conservation)

    desertification: Solutions to desertification: Dune stabilization, which involves the conservation of the plant community living along the sides of dunes. The upper parts of plants help protect the soil from surface winds, whereas the root network below keeps the soil together. Charcoal conversion improvements, which include the use of…

  • dune, coastal (geology)

    coastal landforms: Coastal dunes: Immediately landward of the beach are commonly found large, linear accumulations of sand known as dunes. (For coverage of dunes in arid and semiarid regions, see sand dune.) They form as the wind carries sediment from the beach in a landward direction and…

  • dune, sand

    Sand dune, any accumulation of sand grains shaped into a mound or ridge by the wind under the influence of gravity. Sand dunes are comparable to other forms that appear when a fluid moves over a loose bed, such as subaqueous “dunes” on the beds of rivers and tidal estuaries and sand waves on the

  • Dunedin (New Zealand)

    Dunedin, city and port, Otago local government region, southeastern South Island, New Zealand. It is located at the head of Otago Harbour (14 miles [23 km] long) with deepwater Port Chalmers at its mouth. Founded in 1848 as a Scottish Free Church settlement, the town was chosen for its timber

  • Duneideann (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Edinburgh, capital city of Scotland, located in southeastern Scotland with its centre near the southern shore of the Firth of Forth, an arm of the North Sea that thrusts westward into the Scottish Lowlands. The city and its immediate surroundings constitute an independent council area. The city and

  • Dunér, Nils Christofer (Swedish astronomer)

    Nils Christofer Dunér, Swedish astronomer who studied the rotational period of the Sun. Dunér was senior astronomer (1864–88) at the Royal University Observatory in Lund, Sweden. In 1867 he began his investigations of binary stars. He also performed pioneering stellar spectroscopy studies (studies

  • Dunes (painting by Goyen)

    Jan van Goyen: His Dunes (1629) shows a typical day on the polder (lowland reclaimed from the sea), with several peasants stopping to chat. The cloudy sky, dunes, and battered old homes are picturesquely arranged, unified by van Goyen’s skillful manipulation of tonal variations in browns, blues, greens, and…

  • Dunes (hotel and casino, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States)

    Las Vegas: Emergence of the contemporary city: The venerable Dunes was demolished in October 1993—in true Vegas tradition, as a spectacle in front of a huge crowd of onlookers. It was the last of the city’s 1950s-era hotels, and its destruction symbolically ushered in a new era of elite hotels, including the Venetian and…

  • Dunes, Battle of the (European history)

    Battle of the Dunes, (June 14, 1658), during the Franco-Spanish War of 1648–59, a victory of French and British forces led by Henri de La Tour d’Auvergne, vicomte de Turenne, over Spanish forces near Dunkirk (then just north of the French frontier in the Spanish Netherlands). The victory led to the

  • Dunfermline (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Dunfermline, royal burgh and city, Fife council area and historic county, eastern Scotland, situated on high ground 3 miles (5 km) inland from the Firth of Forth. Early Celtic monks had a settlement there, but the community really developed around the Benedictine abbey (c. 1072). During the Middle

  • Dunford, Joseph (United States general)

    Joseph Dunford, U.S. general who served as commandant of the United States Marine Corps (2014–15) before becoming chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (2015–19). The marine legacy was strong in Dunford’s family. His father served as a marine in the Korean War, and three of his uncles were marines

  • Dunford, Joseph Francis, Jr. (United States general)

    Joseph Dunford, U.S. general who served as commandant of the United States Marine Corps (2014–15) before becoming chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (2015–19). The marine legacy was strong in Dunford’s family. His father served as a marine in the Korean War, and three of his uncles were marines

  • dung (fertilizer)

    Manure, organic material that is used to fertilize land, usually consisting of the feces and urine of domestic livestock, with or without accompanying litter such as straw, hay, or bedding. Farm animals void most of the nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium that is present in the food they eat, and

  • dung beetle (insect)

    Dung beetle, (subfamily Scarabaeinae), any of a group of beetles in the family Scarabaeidae (insect order Coleoptera) that forms manure into a ball using its scooperlike head and paddle-shaped antennae. In some species the ball of manure can be as large as an apple. In the early part of the summer

  • dung chafer (insect)

    Dung beetle, (subfamily Scarabaeinae), any of a group of beetles in the family Scarabaeidae (insect order Coleoptera) that forms manure into a ball using its scooperlike head and paddle-shaped antennae. In some species the ball of manure can be as large as an apple. In the early part of the summer

  • Dung che sai duk (film by Wong Kar-Wai [1994])

    Wong Kar-Wai: …Dung che sai duk (1994; Ashes of Time), took two years to make. (Wong preferred an improvisational style of filmmaking, without a finished script, that often led to long shoots.) Instead of adapting the novel, however, he borrowed three of its characters, for whom he created a prequel centred on…

  • dung fly

    Dung fly, (family Scatophagidae), any member of a family of insects in the fly order, Diptera, that are yellow or brown in colour and are common in pastures. In most species the eggs are laid in cow dung. The larvae then feed on the dung, speeding its decomposition. In other species the larvae feed

  • Dung Gate (gate, Jerusalem)

    Jerusalem: Architecture: …Gate to the east, the Dung and Zion gates to the south, and the Jaffa Gate to the west. An eighth gate, the Golden Gate, to the east, remains sealed, however, for it is through this portal that Jewish legend states that the messiah will enter the city. The Jaffa…

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