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  • Dumars, Joe (American basketball player and executive)

    Detroit Pistons: …was joined by Bill Laimbeer, Joe Dumars, Dennis Rodman, and Vinnie Johnson to form teams that made three consecutive trips to the NBA finals. In 1988 the Pistons lost the finals to the Los Angeles Lakers in a dramatic seven-game series, but the Pistons swept a rematch between the two…

  • Dumas (film by Nebbou [2010])

    Gérard Depardieu: …biopics, including L’Autre Dumas (2010; Dumas), about Alexandre Dumas père, and Rasputin (2011). Other movies included Mammuth (2010), Valley of Love (2015), Un Beau Soleil intérieur (2017; Let the Sunshine In), and Mon cochon et moi (2018; Saving My Pig). From 2016 to 2018

  • Dumas method (chemistry)

    Jean-Baptiste-André Dumas: …pioneered in organic chemistry, particularly organic analysis.

  • Dumas père (French author [1802–1870])

    Alexandre Dumas, père, one of the most prolific and most popular French authors of the 19th century. Without ever attaining indisputable literary merit, Dumas succeeded in gaining a great reputation first as a dramatist and then as a historical novelist, especially for such works as The Count of

  • Dumas, Alexandre (French general [1762–1806])

    Alexandre Dumas, French general during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars. Dumas’s mother, Marie-Cessette Dumas, was a black slave. His father, Alexandre-Antoine Davy, was a white Frenchman. Although later writers—including his son, the novelist Alexandre Dumas—claimed Dumas’s parents

  • Dumas, Alexandre, fils (French author [1824–1895])

    Alexandre Dumas, fils, French playwright and novelist, one of the founders of the “problem play”—that is, of the middle-class realistic drama treating some contemporary ill and offering suggestions for its remedy. He was the son (fils) of the dramatist and novelist Alexandre Dumas, called Dumas

  • Dumas, Alexandre, père (French author [1802–1870])

    Alexandre Dumas, père, one of the most prolific and most popular French authors of the 19th century. Without ever attaining indisputable literary merit, Dumas succeeded in gaining a great reputation first as a dramatist and then as a historical novelist, especially for such works as The Count of

  • Dumas, Charles (American athlete)

    Charles Everett Dumas, American athlete (born Feb. 12, 1937, Tulsa, Okla.—died Jan. 5, 2004, Inglewood, Calif.), was the first high jumper to clear seven feet and months after accomplishing the feat won a gold medal in the event at the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia. Knee injuries ended h

  • Dumas, Henry (American author)

    Henry Dumas, African-American author of poetry and fiction who wrote about the clash between black and white cultures. Dumas grew up in Arkansas and in New York City’s Harlem. While in the U.S. Air Force (1953–57) he won creative-writing awards for his contributions to Air Force periodicals. He

  • Dumas, Jean-Baptiste-André (French chemist)

    Jean-Baptiste-André Dumas, French chemist who pioneered in organic chemistry, particularly organic analysis. Dumas’s father was the town clerk, and Dumas attended the local school. Although briefly apprenticed to an apothecary, in 1816 Dumas traveled to Geneva where he studied pharmacy, chemistry,

  • Dumas, Jean-Louis (French fashion executive)

    Jean-Louis Dumas, (Jean-Louis Robert Frédéric Dumas-Hermès), French fashion executive (born Feb. 2, 1938, Paris, France—died May 1, 2010, Paris), transformed Hermès (founded in 1837 by his mother’s great-grandfather Thierry Hermès) from a prestigious but languishing company into an international

  • Dumas, Sir Lloyd (Australian businessman)

    Adelaide Festival of Arts: …pioneering efforts of newspaper executive Sir Lloyd Dumas and University of Adelaide music professor John Bishop. Inspired by Scotland’s Edinburgh Festival, the two men formulated a plan and a budget to stage a similar event in Adelaide. Their idea won the support of the city’s mayor, who subsequently helped to…

  • Dumas-Hermès, Jean-Louis-Robert-Frédéric (French fashion executive)

    Jean-Louis Dumas, (Jean-Louis Robert Frédéric Dumas-Hermès), French fashion executive (born Feb. 2, 1938, Paris, France—died May 1, 2010, Paris), transformed Hermès (founded in 1837 by his mother’s great-grandfather Thierry Hermès) from a prestigious but languishing company into an international

  • Dumb and Dumber (film by Bobby and Peter Farrelly [1994])

    Jim Carrey: …had continued box-office success with Dumb and Dumber and The Mask (all 1994). In the latter film Carrey played a timid bank clerk who becomes a hip wisecracking green-faced dandy when he dons a magical mask. His performance earned Carrey the first of several Golden Globe Award nominations. He subsequently…

  • Dumb and Dumber To (film by Bobby and Peter Farrelly [2014])

    Jim Carrey: … (2013), Kick-Ass 2 (2013), and Dumb and Dumber To (2014). Carrey took a new direction with Dark Crimes (2016), a gloomy thriller based on a 2008 New Yorker article about a police officer investigating a murder that resembles one described in a crime novel. He then starred as a popular…

  • dumb barter (commerce)

    Silent trade, specialized form of barter in which goods are exchanged without any direct contact between the traders. Generally, one group goes to a customary spot, deposits the goods to be traded, and withdraws, sometimes giving a signal such as a call or a gong stroke. Another group then comes to

  • dumb cane (plant)

    Dumb cane, (genus Dieffenbachia), any of about 30 species of herbaceous plants valued as indoor foliage for their ability to tolerate low light intensities. The name mother-in-law’s tongue, sometimes used for these plants, is also applied to Sansevieria species. Dumb cane (especially D. seguine)

  • dumb gulper shark (fish)

    Dumb gulper shark, (Centrophorus harrissoni), little-known shark of the family Squalidae that is related to the dogfishes. Like all members of the genus Centrophorus, it has large green eyes. The dumb gulper shark grows to up to 43 inches (109 cm) in length. It has been found almost solely off the

  • dumb terminal (technology)

    Thin client, low-powered computer terminal or software application providing access over a network to a dedicated server. Thin clients typically consist of a monitor, a keyboard, and a mouse, with no hard disk and a minimal amount of memory. A thin client may also be a software application running

  • Dumb Waiter, The (play by Pinter)

    The Dumb Waiter, drama in one act by Harold Pinter, produced in 1959 and published in 1960. It projected the uneasy feeling of comic menace that was prevalent in Pinter’s early plays. The Dumb Waiter is a two-character play set in the basement of an old rooming house, connected to the rooms above

  • Dumbarton (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Dumbarton, royal burgh (town), West Dunbartonshire council area, historic county of Dunbartonshire, Scotland. It lies north-northwest of the metropolitan complex of Glasgow, on the banks of the River Leven near its confluence with the River Clyde. The site is dominated by a hill of basalt—with an

  • Dumbarton (former county, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Dunbartonshire, historic county of west-central Scotland, northwest and northeast of Glasgow. It comprises two sections: the main body of the county in the west, extending along the north bank of the River Clyde from the outskirts of Glasgow to Loch Long, and a smaller detached area in the east

  • Dumbarton Oaks (mansion, Washington, District of Columbia, United States)

    Washington, D.C.: Georgetown: …Tudor Place, Dumbarton House, and Dumbarton Oaks Estate and gardens. In the early 21st century, Georgetown residents included a mix of university students, government and private sector workers, and upper-middle-class families. The neighbourhood has a variety of unique shops, restaurants, and nightclubs.

  • Dumbarton Oaks Conference

    Dumbarton Oaks Conference, (August 21–October 7, 1944), meeting at Dumbarton Oaks, a mansion in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., where representatives of China, the Soviet Union, the United States, and the United Kingdom formulated proposals for a world organization that became the basis for the

  • Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection (institution, Washington, District of Columbia, United States)

    Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, in Washington, D.C., institution in a Georgian-style mansion built in 1801 and housing Byzantine art (4th–15th century), pre-Columbian art (in an addition of eight circular glass galleries designed by Philip Johnson), and three libraries: a

  • Dumbartonshire (former county, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Dunbartonshire, historic county of west-central Scotland, northwest and northeast of Glasgow. It comprises two sections: the main body of the county in the west, extending along the north bank of the River Clyde from the outskirts of Glasgow to Loch Long, and a smaller detached area in the east

  • Dumbfounding, The (work by Avison)

    Margaret Avison: …poem of her second collection, The Dumbfounding (1966). Less introspective and more direct, these poems recall 17th-century Metaphysical poetry, as they present images of spiritual vitality in everyday life. Many of her poems in Sunblue (1978) are based on biblical stories; the poems further investigate her Christian beliefs, and she…

  • ?umbier Peak (mountain, Europe)

    Tatra Mountains: …Low Tatra range, rising to ?umbier (6,703 feet [2,043 metres]).

  • Dumbo (animated film by Sharpsteen [1941])

    Dumbo, American animated musical film, released in 1941, that was produced by Walt Disney and was based on a children’s book of the same name written by Helen Aberson and illustrated by Harold Pearl. The film centres on Dumbo, a baby circus elephant who is constantly taunted by other animals

  • Dumbo (film by Burton [2019])

    Tim Burton: …he received mixed reviews for Dumbo, a live-action remake of the 1941 Disney classic.

  • dumdum (ammunition)

    Dum Dum: …ammunition factory in which the dumdum, an expanding bullet, was first made. Jute mills, a tannery, iron- and steel-rolling works, and glass, match, and soap factories, as well as several large engineering concerns, are located in Dum Dum. The city has several hospitals and a college affiliated with the University…

  • Dumesnil, Mademoiselle (French actress)

    Mademoiselle Dumesnil, French tragic actress best known for her roles in the plays of Voltaire and Jean Racine. She made her Paris debut in 1737 at the Comédie-Fran?aise as Clytemnestre in Racine’s Iphigénie en Aulide. A fiery actress who scorned tradition, she played Cléopatre in Corneille’s

  • Dumetella carolinensis (bird)

    catbird: The North American catbird (Dumetella carolinensis), of the family Mimidae (order Passeriformes), is 23 cm (9 inches) long and is gray, with a black cap. It frequents gardens and thickets. The black catbird (Melanoptila glabrirostris) is found in coastal Yucatán.

  • Dumézil, Georges (French philologist)

    myth: Justification or validation: …French historian of ancient religion Georges Dumézil was the pioneer in suggesting that the priestly, warrior, and producing classes in ancient Indo-European societies regarded themselves as having been ordained to particular tasks by virtue of their mythological origins. And in every known cultural tradition there exists some mythological foundation that…

  • Dumfries (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Dumfries, royal burgh (1186), Dumfries and Galloway council area, historic county of Dumfriesshire, situated on the left bank of the River Nith 8 miles (13 km) from the Solway Firth, an Irish Sea inlet. Dumfries is the largest burgh in southwestern Scotland. It also is the main market and

  • Dumfries (former county, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Dumfriesshire, historic county, southwestern Scotland. Along the Solway Firth in the south, Dumfriesshire incorporates a coastal plain stretching from the mouth of the River Nith in the west to the English border in the east. A series of river valleys—Nithsdale, Annandale, and Eskdale—extend

  • Dumfries and Galloway (council area, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Dumfries and Galloway, council area of southwestern Scotland whose coast borders the Solway Firth, the Irish Sea, and the North Channel. It encompasses the historic counties of Dumfriesshire, Kirkcudbrightshire, and Wigtownshire and a small section of Ayrshire in the west. The council area extends

  • Dumfriesshire (former county, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Dumfriesshire, historic county, southwestern Scotland. Along the Solway Firth in the south, Dumfriesshire incorporates a coastal plain stretching from the mouth of the River Nith in the west to the English border in the east. A series of river valleys—Nithsdale, Annandale, and Eskdale—extend

  • Dumha na nGiall (archaeological site, Ireland)

    Tara: 2100 bc) known as Dumha na nGiall (“Mound of the Hostages”). Numerous Bronze Age burials were found in the earth mound, which lies just inside the perimeter of a vast oval enclosure called Ráth na Riógh (“Fortress of the Kings”). Near the centre of this are two conjoined earthworks:…

  • Dumka (India)

    Dumka, town, northeastern Jharkhand state, northeastern India. It lies east of the Mayurakshi (Mor) River, about 35 miles (55 km) southeast of Deoghar. The town was constituted a municipality in 1903. Dumka is a road junction, major agricultural trade centre, and headquarters of Sido Kanhu (Siddhu

  • Dümmer Lake (lake, Germany)

    Lower Saxony: Physical features: …miles [30 square km]) and Dümmer Lake (about 6 square miles [15 square km]). The highland area occupies the southern portions of the state and contains the Weser, Deister, and Harz mountains. The important Mittelland Canal runs east-west across the south-central part of Lower Saxony.

  • Dummer, Jeremiah (British-American colonial agent)

    Jeremiah Dummer, British-American colonial agent, author, and benefactor of Yale College. Jeremiah Dummer, the son of Jeremiah Dummer, Sr., a prosperous Boston silversmith and engraver, graduated from Harvard University in 1699 and afterward studied in Holland and received a doctorate from the

  • Dummett, Michael (British philosopher)

    Sir Michael A.E. Dummett, English philosopher who did influential work in the philosophy of language, metaphysics, logic, the philosophy of mathematics, and the history of analytic philosophy. He was also one of the foremost expositors of the work of the German mathematical logician Gottlob Frege

  • Dummett, Sir Michael A. E. (British philosopher)

    Sir Michael A.E. Dummett, English philosopher who did influential work in the philosophy of language, metaphysics, logic, the philosophy of mathematics, and the history of analytic philosophy. He was also one of the foremost expositors of the work of the German mathematical logician Gottlob Frege

  • Dummett, Sir Michael Anthony Eardley (British philosopher)

    Sir Michael A.E. Dummett, English philosopher who did influential work in the philosophy of language, metaphysics, logic, the philosophy of mathematics, and the history of analytic philosophy. He was also one of the foremost expositors of the work of the German mathematical logician Gottlob Frege

  • Dummy (album by Portishead)

    Portishead: The group’s debut album, Dummy (1994), was widely hailed as a dark masterpiece. Gibbons’s vocals, which alternately evoked Billie Holiday’s growl and Judy Collins’s plaintive soprano, served as an anchor for the instrumental experimentation of Barrow and Utley, who integrated sound loops, samples from 1960s film sound tracks, and…

  • dummy (card games)

    bridge: The development of the game: …played a game called “dummy” (with one hand exposed) long before any bridge game was known or willingly played.

  • Dummy (television film by Perry [1979])

    Frank Perry: …worked in television, then made Dummy (1979), an acclaimed TV drama that dealt with the true case of a handicapped young black man (LeVar Burton) who is defended on a murder charge by a court-appointed attorney (Paul Sorvino). It received a Peabody Award.

  • dummy shuttle loom

    textile: Modern looms: …of which the first predominates: dummy shuttle, rapier, and fluid jet. The dummy-shuttle type, the most successful of the shuttleless looms, makes use of a dummy shuttle, a projectile that contains no weft but that passes through the shed in the manner of a shuttle and leaves a trail of…

  • dummy variable (statistics)

    statistics: Model building: So-called dummy variables are used to represent qualitative variables in regression analysis. For example, the dummy variable x could be used to represent container type by setting x = 0 if the iced tea is packaged in a bottle and x = 1 if the iced…

  • dummy, ventriloquist’s

    puppetry: Other types: …artistically altogether inferior, are the dummies used by ventriloquists; ventriloquism, as such, has no relation to puppetry, but the ventriloquists’ figures, with their ingenious facial movements, are true puppets. The technique of the human actor carrying the puppet actor onto the stage and sometimes speaking for it is one that…

  • Dumnonii (people)

    Devon: …probably the capital of the Dumnonii, a British tribe, until the foundation of Exeter as a Roman frontier station at the termination of Fosse Way. The Dumnonii survived the 7th-century Saxon conquests, but both Saxon and Briton became subjects of Wessex. Devon was recognized as a shire in the late…

  • Dumont d’Urville, Jules-Sébastien-César (French explorer)

    Jules-Sébastien-César Dumont d’Urville, French navigator who commanded voyages of exploration to the South Pacific (1826–29) and the Antarctic (1837–40), resulting in extensive revisions of existing charts and discovery or redesignation of island groups. In 1820, while on a charting survey of the

  • DuMont Television Network (American company)

    DuMont Television Network, American television network of the 1940s and ’50s, established in 1946 by DuMont Laboratories and its founder, Allen B. DuMont. The parent company was a pioneer in early television technology, but, largely because it lacked the support of a radio network, the DuMont

  • DuMont, Allen B. (American engineer and inventor)

    Allen B. DuMont, American engineer who perfected the first commercially practical cathode-ray tube, which was not only vitally important for much scientific and technical equipment but was the essential component of the modern television receiver. DuMont joined the Westinghouse Lamp Company,

  • DuMont, Allen Balcom (American engineer and inventor)

    Allen B. DuMont, American engineer who perfected the first commercially practical cathode-ray tube, which was not only vitally important for much scientific and technical equipment but was the essential component of the modern television receiver. DuMont joined the Westinghouse Lamp Company,

  • Dumont, Fran?ois (French painter)

    Fran?ois Dumont, one of the greatest miniature painters. He studied for a time under Jean Girardet and in 1788 was accepted as an academician and granted an apartment in the Louvre. He painted portraits of Louis XVI, Marie-Antoinette, Louis XVIII, and Charles X and of almost all the important

  • Dumont, Gabriel (Métis leader)

    Gabriel Dumont, Métis leader who rose to political prominence in an age of declining buffalo herds and was concerned about the ongoing economic prosperity and political independence of his people. He was a prominent hunt chief and warrior, but he is best known for his role in the North-West

  • Dumont, Margaret (American actress)

    Duck Soup: Margaret Dumont, a standard in the Marx Brothers’ films, was once again the butt of Groucho’s barbs, playing a rich dowager easily wooed by his questionable charms. When the ambassador of neighbouring country Sylvania attempts to overthrow Firefly—and win Dumont’s affections—Firefly declares war on Sylvania.…

  • Dumont, Pierre-étienne-Louis (Swiss legal scholar, politician, and clergyman)

    Jeremy Bentham: Early life and works: …in 1811 by his admirer étienne Dumont and entitled Théorie des peines et des récompenses. This work eventually appeared in English as The Rationale of Reward (1825) and The Rationale of Punishment (1830). In 1785 Bentham started, by way of Italy and Constantinople, on a visit to his brother, Samuel…

  • Dumont, René (French agronomist)

    René Dumont, French agronomist (born March 13, 1904, Cambrai, France—died June 18, 2001, Fontenay-sous-Bois, France), unsuccessfully ran for president of France in 1974 on the nation’s first environmental platform; although he garnered only 1.3% of the vote, his campaign triggered an ecological m

  • Dumont, Tony (French painter)

    Fran?ois Dumont: A younger brother, known as Tony Dumont, was also a miniature painter, a pupil of his brother, a frequent exhibitor, and the recipient of a medal from the French Academy in 1810. Each artist signed with the surname only, and there is some controversy concerning the attribution to each of…

  • Dumouriez, Charles-Fran?ois du Périer (French general)

    Charles-Fran?ois du Périer Dumouriez, French general who won signal victories for the French Revolution in 1792–93 and then traitorously deserted to the Austrians. The son of a war commissary, Dumouriez entered the French army in 1758 and served with distinction against the Prussians in the Seven

  • dUMP (chemical compound)

    metabolism: Deoxyribonucleotides: …acid (dTMP) is derived from deoxyuridylic acid (dUMP).

  • dump leaching (industrial process)

    gold processing: Cyanidation: …extracting gold from low-grade ores, heap leaching is practiced. The huge heaps described above are sprayed with a dilute solution of sodium cyanide, and this percolates down through the piled ore, dissolving the gold.

  • dump method (cookery)

    cake: In the quick-dump, or one-bowl, method, all the ingredients except the leavening agent are put into a bowl and mixed vigorously (preferably with a power mixer), the leavening agent added, and mixing completed. As a modification of the method, the eggs and part of the milk may be added…

  • dumping (waste removal)

    solid-waste management: Early waste disposal: …task of carting waste to dumps outside city walls. But this was not the case in smaller towns, where most people still threw waste into the streets. It was not until 1714 that every city in England was required to have an official scavenger. Toward the end of the 18th…

  • Dumplin’ (film by Fletcher [2018])

    Jennifer Aniston: …pageant in the Netflix movie Dumplin’ (2018). She then paired up with Adam Sandler in the comedy Murder Mystery (2019), playing a married couple framed for killing a billionaire. During this time Aniston occasionally made guest appearances on TV series, but in 2019 she took a starring role in The…

  • dumpling (food)

    Dumpling, small mass of leavened dough that is either boiled or steamed and served in soups or stews or with fruit. Dumplings are most commonly formed from flour or meal bound with egg and then simmered in water or gravy stock until they take on a light, cakey texture. Many recipes call for herbs,

  • Dumu-zid (Mesopotamian god)

    Tammuz, in Mesopotamian religion, god of fertility embodying the powers for new life in nature in the spring. The name Tammuz seems to have been derived from the Akkadian form Tammuzi, based on early Sumerian Damu-zid, The Flawless Young, which in later standard Sumerian became Dumu-zid, or Dumuzi.

  • Dumuzi (Mesopotamian god)

    Tammuz, in Mesopotamian religion, god of fertility embodying the powers for new life in nature in the spring. The name Tammuz seems to have been derived from the Akkadian form Tammuzi, based on early Sumerian Damu-zid, The Flawless Young, which in later standard Sumerian became Dumu-zid, or Dumuzi.

  • Dumuzi-Abzu (Sumerian deity)

    Dumuzi-Abzu, in Mesopotamian religion, Sumerian deity, city goddess of Kinirsha near Lagash in the southeastern marshland region. She represented the power of fertility and new life in the marshes. Dumuzi-Abzu corresponded to the Sumerian god Dumuzi of the central steppe area, and thus around Eridu

  • Dumuzi-Amaushumgalana (Sumerian deity)

    Dumuzi-Amaushumgalana, in Mesopotamian religion, Sumerian deity especially popular in the southern orchard regions and later in the central steppe area. He was the young bridegroom of the goddess Inanna (Akkadian: Ishtar), a fertility figure sometimes called the Lady of the Date Clusters. As such,

  • Dumyā? (Egypt)

    Damietta, city, capital of Dumyā? mu?āfa?ah (governorate), in the Nile River delta, Lower Egypt, on the Mediterranean coast. Damietta, the port of the governorate, is located 8 miles (13 km) from the Mediterranean, on the right (east) bank of the Damietta branch of the Nile. The name is a

  • Dumyā? (governorate, Egypt)

    Dumyā?, mu?āfa?ah (governorate) in the Nile River delta, Lower Egypt, on the Mediterranean coast. It is bisected by the Damietta branch of the Nile, which empties into the Mediterranean Sea 8 miles (13 km) northeast of the capital, Damietta. Fishing and agriculture are the main industries outside

  • Dumyā? (river, Egypt)

    Nile River: Physiography: …distributaries, the Rosetta and the Damietta (Dumyā?) branches.

  • Dun (valley, India)

    Dehra Dun: The section called the Dun is a valley between the Himalayan foothills and the Siwalik Range to the south. Rice, wheat, millet, tea, and other crops are grown; and the locality produces valuable timber. Mussoorie, a hill station north of Dehra Dun city, is a popular summer resort. Rishikesh…

  • dun (biology)

    mayfly: Life cycle: …a winged form, called the subimago, or dun, emerges. The subimago flies from the surface of the water to some sheltered resting place nearby. After an interval lasting a few minutes to several days, but usually overnight, the skin is shed for the last time, and the imago, or adult…

  • dun (landform)

    Uttarakhand: Relief: …flat-floored depressions, known locally as duns, such as the Dehra Dun.

  • Dun & Bradstreet, Inc. (American corporation)

    mercantile agency: …the most widely known agency, Dun & Bradstreet, Inc.

  • Dun Cow, The Book of the (Irish literature)

    The Book of the Dun Cow, oldest surviving miscellaneous manuscript in Irish literature, so called because the original vellum upon which it was written was supposedly taken from the hide of the famous cow of St. Ciarán of Clonmacnoise. Compiled about 1100 by learned Irish monks at the monastery of

  • Dún Dealgan (Ireland)

    Dundalk, seaport, urban district, and administrative centre of County Louth, extreme northeastern Ireland. It lies near the mouth of the Castletown River on Dundalk Bay, about 45 miles (70 km) north of Dublin. Dundalk received charters from King John about 1200 and later from other monarchs. During

  • Dun Eideann (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Edinburgh, capital city of Scotland, located in southeastern Scotland with its centre near the southern shore of the Firth of Forth, an arm of the North Sea that thrusts westward into the Scottish Lowlands. The city and its immediate surroundings constitute an independent council area. The city and

  • Dún Garbhán (Ireland)

    Dungarvan, market town, seaport, urban district, and administrative centre of County Waterford, Ireland, on the Bay of Dungarvan at the mouth of the River Colligan. The name is derived from St. Gervan, who founded a monastery there in the 7th century. Ruins include a castle built by King John circa

  • Dún Geanainn (Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Dungannon, town and former district (1973–2015), astride the former counties of Armagh and Tyrone, now in the Mid Ulster district, central Northern Ireland. Its early history is linked with the O’Neills, earls of Tyrone, whose chief residence was there; a large rath, or earthwork, north of the

  • Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown (county, Ireland)

    Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown, county in the province of Leinster, eastern Ireland. The county of Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown was created in 1994 when the geographic county of Dublin was split administratively into three separate units. It now constitutes the southern component of the Greater Dublin

  • Dún na nGall (county, Ireland)

    Donegal, most northerly county of Ireland, in the historic province of Ulster. The small village of Lifford in eastern Donegal is the county seat. Donegal is bounded on the west and north by the Atlantic Ocean, on the east by Lough (lake) Foyle and Northern Ireland, and on the south by Northern

  • Dún Na nGall (Ireland)

    Donegal, seaport and market town, County Donegal, Ireland, on the River Eske at the head of Donegal Bay. It is famed for its historic associations and picturesque environs. South of the town are the ruins of the Franciscan Donegal Abbey (founded 1474). Donegal Castle, a stronghold of the

  • Dún Pádraig (Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Downpatrick, town, Newry, Mourne, and Down district, southeastern Northern Ireland. Downpatrick is located where the River Quoilé broadens into its estuary in Strangford Lough (inlet of the sea). The town takes its name from dún (fortress) and from its association with St. Patrick. It is the

  • Dún, An (former district, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Down, former district (1973–2015) within the former County Down, now part of Newry, Mourne and Down district, situated on Northern Ireland’s eastern coast fronting Strangford Lough (inlet of the sea) and the Irish Sea. It was bordered by the former districts of Ards to the north; Castlereagh,

  • Duna (river, Europe)

    Danube River, river, the second longest in Europe after the Volga. It rises in the Black Forest mountains of western Germany and flows for some 1,770 miles (2,850 km) to its mouth on the Black Sea. Along its course it passes through 10 countries: Germany, Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia,

  • Dünaburg (Latvia)

    Daugavpils, city, southeastern Latvia. It lies along the Western Dvina (Daugava) River. In the 1270s the Brothers of the Sword, a branch of the Teutonic Knights, founded the fortress of Dünaburg, 12 miles (19 km) above the modern site. The fortress and adjoining town were destroyed, and then

  • Dunaf?ldvár bridge (bridge, Hungary)

    Tolna: The Dunaf?ldvár bridge (built 1928–32) is the only bridge over the Budapest-Baja section of the Danube and is of great importance. A huge biorefinery in Dunaf?ldvár uses feed-grade corn to produce animal feed, bioethanol, and corn oil. The enamelware produced in Bonyhád is known worldwide.

  • Dunaj (river, Europe)

    Danube River, river, the second longest in Europe after the Volga. It rises in the Black Forest mountains of western Germany and flows for some 1,770 miles (2,850 km) to its mouth on the Black Sea. Along its course it passes through 10 countries: Germany, Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia,

  • Dunajec River (river, Poland)

    Dunajec River, river in southern Poland, rising in the Tatra Mountains near the Slovak border and flowing about 156 miles (251 km) northeast into the Vistula River. The Dunajec River is dammed for hydropower at Ro?nów, Czchów, and Czorsztyn. It was the scene of heavy fighting in World War I when

  • Dunajec-San offensive (European history)

    World War I: The Eastern Front, 1915: …the Russian centre in the Dunajec River sector of Galicia by an attack on the 18-mile front from Gorlice to Tuchów (south of Tarnów), was conceived with tactical originality: in order to maintain the momentum of advance, no daily objectives were to be set for individual corps or divisions; instead,…

  • Dunajská Streda (town, Slovakia)

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  • Dunaliella (genus of green algae)

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    Henri Dunant, Swiss humanitarian, founder of the Red Cross (now Red Cross and Red Crescent) and the World Alliance of Young Men’s Christian Associations. He was cowinner (with Frédéric Passy) of the first Nobel Prize for Peace in 1901. An eyewitness of the Battle of Solferino (June 24, 1859), which

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