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  • dancing crowd (psychology)

    collective behaviour: Expressive crowds: Not all crowds act. In some crowds the participants are largely preoccupied with themselves or with one another, and with participation in a common experience. Beginning as early as the 7th century in Europe, and continuing throughout the Middle Ages, there were reported…

  • dancing dervish (Sufi order)

    Mawlawīyah, fraternity of Sufis (Muslim mystics) founded in Konya (Qonya), Anatolia, by the Persian Sufi poet Rūmī (d. 1273), whose popular title mawlānā (Arabic: “our master”) gave the order its name. The order, propagated throughout Anatolia, controlled Konya and environs by the 15th century and

  • dancing devil (meteorology)

    whirlwind: Dust devils: …secondary vortices are sometimes called dancing devils. Such clusters of vortices are probably tied to a large thermal plume passing by.

  • Dancing Figures, Tomb of the (tomb, China)

    Korean art: Painting: In the Tomb of the Dancing Figures in the Tonggou region around Ji’an, the master is shown on the northern wall of the main chamber feasting with visiting Buddhist monks. A troupe of dancers is painted on the eastern wall and a hunting scene on the western…

  • Dancing Girls (short stories by Atwood)

    Margaret Atwood: …collected in such volumes as Dancing Girls (1977), Bluebeard’s Egg (1983), Wilderness Tips (1991), Moral Disorder (2006), and Stone Mattress (2014). Her nonfiction includes Negotiating with the Dead: A Writer on Writing (2002), which grew out of a series of lectures she gave at the University of

  • dancing ground (animal behaviour)

    Lek, in animal behaviour, communal area in which two or more males of a species perform courtship displays. Lek behaviour, also called arena behaviour, is found in a number of insects, birds, and mammals. Varying degrees of interaction occur between the males, from virtually none to closely

  • Dancing in the Dust (film by Farhadi [2003])

    Asghar Farhadi: …film, Ragh? dar ghobār (Dancing in the Dust), about a young man who flees to the desert after being forced to divorce his wife over rumours that her mother is a prostitute; Farhardi also penned the screenplay, as he would for most of his films. He next made Shahr-e…

  • Dancing in the Street (song by Gaye, Stevenson, and Hunter)

    Martha and the Vandellas: Their biggest hit, “Dancing in the Street” (1964), was cowritten by Gaye. A shifting lineup of Vandellas had limited success into the 1970s, and Reeves embarked on a solo career in 1974. Martha and the Vandellas were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995.

  • Dancing Lady (film by Leonard [1933])

    Fred Astaire: Early career: …dancer in the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer production Dancing Lady (1933), which starred Joan Crawford, Clark Gable, and the Three Stooges.

  • dancing master (dance)

    choreography: During the Renaissance, dance masters in Italy, such as Domenico da Piacenza, taught social dances at court and probably began to invent new ones or arrange variants of known dances, thus combining a creative function with their educational ones. Staged ballet employed the same steps and movements as…

  • Dancing Mouse, The (work by Yerkes)

    Robert M. Yerkes: …mammals, and his first book, The Dancing Mouse (1907), helped establish the use of mice and rats as standard laboratory subjects in psychological testing. He became interested in the psychological testing of humans, and he contributed much to the development of multiple-choice testing and a widely used point scale (1915)…

  • Dancing Plague of 1518 (event, Strasbourg, France)

    Dancing plague of 1518, event in which hundreds of citizens of Strasbourg (then a free city within the Holy Roman Empire, now in France) danced uncontrollably and apparently unwillingly for days on end; the mania lasted for about two months before ending as mysteriously as it began. In July 1518, a

  • Dancing Queen (recording by ABBA)

    ABBA: …catchy and undeniably club-friendly “Dancing Queen.” The Album (1978) marked a departure of sorts: although its standout single, “Take a Chance on Me,” was a brilliant, if straightforward, pop anthem, other tracks hinted at an art rock influence, and the album’s second side was dominated by a “mini-musical” titled…

  • dancing red monkey (primate)

    Patas monkey, (Erythrocebus patas), long-limbed and predominantly ground-dwelling primate found in the grass and scrub regions of West and Central Africa and southeast to the Serengeti plains. The adult male patas monkey has shaggy fur set off by a white mustache and white underparts, and its build

  • Dancing Through the Minefield: Some Observations on the Theory, Method, and Politics in Feminist Literary Criticism (work by Kolodny)

    Annette Kolodny: “Dancing Through the Minefield: Some Observations on the Theory, Method, and Politics in Feminist Literary Criticism” (1983) combines feminist social history with Kolodny’s personal history—she had won a judgment against the University of New Hampshire, which she accused of anti-Semitism and sex discrimination in denying…

  • Danckelmann, Eberhard (Prussian statesman)

    Brandenburg: …adviser about this time was Eberhard Danckelmann (1643–1722), whose services in continuing the reforming work of the Great Elector were very valuable; but, having made many enemies, he fell from power in 1697 and was imprisoned for several years. The most important work of Frederick III was to crown the…

  • Dancourt, Florent Carton (French author)

    Florent Carton Dancourt, actor and playwright who created the French comedy of manners and was one of the most popular of French dramatists before the Revolution. Born into an established bourgeois family, Dancourt was educated in Paris by Jesuits and studied law. In 1680 he married an actress,

  • da??a (Indian political concept)

    India: The concept of the state: …primarily dependent on two factors: danda (authority) and dharma (in its sense of the social order—i.e., the preservation of the caste structure). The Artha-shastra, moreover, refers to the seven limbs (saptanga) of the state as the king, administration, territory, capital, treasury, coercive authority, and allies. However, the importance of the…

  • Danda, Mahamadou (prime minister of Niger)

    Niger: Military coup and return to civilian rule: …junta named former cabinet minister Mahamadou Danda as prime minister, and a 20-member transition government was named on March 1. A new constitution, which curbed the presidential powers that Tandja had introduced in 2009, was approved by voters in October 2010.

  • Dandak Forest (forest, India)

    Dandakaranya: …derives its name from the Dandak Forest (the abode of the demon Dandak) in the Hindu epic Ramayana. It was successively ruled by the Nalas, Vakatakas, and Chalukyas in ancient times and now is the home of the Gond people. Most of the region is a sanded-over peneplain with a…

  • Dandakaranya (region, India)

    Dandakaranya, physiographic region in east-central India. Extending over an area of about 35,600 square miles (92,300 square km), it includes the Abujhmar Hills in the west and borders the Eastern Ghats in the east. The Dandakaranya includes parts of Chhattisgarh, Odisha, Telangana, and Andhra

  • Dandakaranya Development Authority (Indian company)

    Dandakaranya: The Dandakaranya Development Authority was created by the union (central) government in 1958 to assist refugees from what was then East Pakistan (now Bangladesh). It constructed the Bhaskel and Pakhanjore irrigation projects in southwestern Odisha and southern Chhattisgarh, respectively; woodworking centres at locations such as Jagdalpur…

  • dandaniti (Indian philosophy)

    Indian philosophy: Early theories of kingship and state: …is that of protection, and dandaniti, or the art of punishment, is subordinated to rajadharma, or dharma of the king. Though it recognizes a quasi-divinity of the king, the Mahabharata makes the dharma, the moral law, superior to the king.

  • Dandānqān, Battle of (Iranian history)

    Battle of Dandānqān, (1040), decisive clash between the forces of the Ghaznavid sultan Mas?ūd I (reigned 1031–41) and the nomad Turkmen Seljuqs in Khorāsān. The battle resulted in Mas?ūd’s defeat and the Seljuq takeover of Ghaznavid territory in Iran and Afghanistan. The late 1030s saw a struggle

  • Dandarah (Egypt)

    Dandarah, agricultural town on the west bank of the Nile, in Qinā mu?āfa?ah (governorate), Upper Egypt. The modern town is built on the ancient site of Ta-ynt-netert (She of the Divine Pillar), or Tentyra. It was the capital of the sixth nome (province) of pharaonic Upper Egypt and was dedicated to

  • dandelion (plant)

    Dandelion, weedy perennial herb of the genus Taraxacum of the family Asteraceae, native to Eurasia but widespread throughout much of temperate North America. The most familiar species is T. officinale. It has a rosette of leaves at the base of the plant; a deep taproot; a smooth, hollow stem;

  • Dandelion Wine (novel by Bradbury)

    Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451, Dandelion Wine, and scripts: …of Bradbury’s most personal works, Dandelion Wine (1957), is an autobiographical novel about a magical but too brief summer of a 12-year-old boy in Green Town, Illinois (a fictionalized version of his childhood home of Waukegan). His next collection, A Medicine for Melancholy (1959), contained “All Summer in a Day,”…

  • Dandenong Ranges (mountains, Australia)

    Dandenong Ranges, mountain ranges, part of the Eastern Highlands, east of Melbourne in southern Victoria, Australia. Several peaks exceed 1,600 ft (500 m), the highest of which is Mt. Dandenong (2,077 ft). With nearly twice as much rainfall as the nearby coastal plain and with fertile volcanic

  • Dandi March (Indian history)

    Salt March, major nonviolent protest action in India led by Mohandas (Mahatma) Gandhi in March–April 1930. The march was the first act in an even-larger campaign of civil disobedience (satyagraha) Gandhi waged against British rule in India that extended into early 1931 and garnered Gandhi

  • Dandie Dinmont terrier (breed of dog)

    Dandie Dinmont terrier, breed of terrier developed in the border country of England and Scotland. First noted as a distinct breed about 1700, it was later named after a character created by Sir Walter Scott in his novel Guy Mannering (1815). Unlike other terriers, the Dandie Dinmont has a softly

  • Dandin (Indian author)

    Dandin, Indian Sanskrit writer of prose romances and expounder on poetics. Scholars attribute to him with certainty only two works: the Dashakumaracharita, translated in 2005 by Isabelle Onians as What Ten Young Men Did, and the Kavyadarsha (“The Mirror of Poetry”). The Dashakumaracharita is a

  • Dando, Jill Wendy (British television broadcaster)

    Jill Wendy Dando, British television broadcaster (born Nov. 9, 1961, Weston-super-Mare, Eng.—died April 26, 1999, London, Eng.), served as an anchor of newscasts as well as host of the Crimewatch UK and Holiday series and had just begun presenting The Antiques Inspectors show. Her talent and g

  • Dandolo family (Italian family)

    Dandolo Family, an ancient Italian family distinguished in the history of Venice. It rose quickly to prominence when expansion from the lagoons to the mainland began. By the 11th century it was rich, and by the 12th (when the branches of San Luca, San Severo, and San Moisè can already be

  • Dandolo, Enrico (doge of Venice)

    Enrico Dandolo, doge of the Republic of Venice from 1192 to 1205, noted for his promotion of the Fourth Crusade, which led to the overthrow of the Greek Byzantine Empire and the aggrandizement of Venice. Dandolo’s father, Vitale, had held important public positions; and during Enrico Dandolo’s

  • Dandolo, Giovanni (doge of Venice)

    coin: Italy and Sicily: The series begun under Giovanni Dandolo continued with the names of the successive doges until the early 19th century.

  • Dandolo, Vincenzo (Italian chemist and statesman)

    Vincenzo Dandolo, Italian chemist and statesman, an innovator in both science and politics. He helped further democratic ideas in Italy, while his writings, especially on agriculture, won him a reputation throughout Europe. Of modest origins, Dandolo, after studying chemistry at the University of

  • Dandong (China)

    Dandong, city, southeastern Liaoning sheng (province), northeastern China. Dandong is a prefecture-level municipality (shi), and the territory under its administration includes not only the municipal area but also several counties occupying the entire North Korean border zone of Liaoning. It is

  • Dandridge, Dandy (American baseball player)

    Ray Dandridge, American professional baseball player who spent most of his career between 1933 and 1955 playing in the Negro leagues and on teams outside the United States. Dandridge was an outstanding defensive third baseman. Although he had little power, he often posted batting averages of over

  • Dandridge, Dorothy (American singer and actress)

    Dorothy Dandridge, American singer and film actress who was the first black woman to be nominated for an Academy Award for best actress. Dandridge’s mother was an entertainer and comedic actress who, after settling in Los Angeles, had some success in radio and, later, television. The young Dorothy

  • Dandridge, Dorothy Jean (American singer and actress)

    Dorothy Dandridge, American singer and film actress who was the first black woman to be nominated for an Academy Award for best actress. Dandridge’s mother was an entertainer and comedic actress who, after settling in Los Angeles, had some success in radio and, later, television. The young Dorothy

  • Dandridge, Hooks (American baseball player)

    Ray Dandridge, American professional baseball player who spent most of his career between 1933 and 1955 playing in the Negro leagues and on teams outside the United States. Dandridge was an outstanding defensive third baseman. Although he had little power, he often posted batting averages of over

  • Dandridge, Martha (American first lady)

    Martha Washington, American first lady (1789–97), the wife of George Washington, first president of the United States and commander in chief of the colonial armies during the American Revolutionary War. She set many of the standards and customs for the proper behaviour and treatment of the

  • Dandridge, Ray (American baseball player)

    Ray Dandridge, American professional baseball player who spent most of his career between 1933 and 1955 playing in the Negro leagues and on teams outside the United States. Dandridge was an outstanding defensive third baseman. Although he had little power, he often posted batting averages of over

  • Dandridge, Raymond Emmett (American baseball player)

    Ray Dandridge, American professional baseball player who spent most of his career between 1933 and 1955 playing in the Negro leagues and on teams outside the United States. Dandridge was an outstanding defensive third baseman. Although he had little power, he often posted batting averages of over

  • dandruff (dermatology)

    Dandruff, skin disorder, a form of seborrheic dermatitis (q.v.) that affects the

  • dandy fever (disease)

    Dengue, acute, infectious, mosquito-borne fever that is temporarily incapacitating but rarely fatal. Besides fever, the disease is characterized by an extreme pain in and stiffness of the joints (hence the name “breakbone fever”). Complication of dengue fever can give rise to a more severe form,

  • dandy horse (bicycle)

    bicycle: Draisiennes, hobby-horses, and other velocipedes: The first two-wheeled rider-propelled machine for which there is indisputable evidence was the draisienne, invented by Baron Karl von Drais de Sauerbrun of Germany. In 1817 he rode it for 14 km (9 miles), and the following year he exhibited it…

  • dandy roll (technology)

    papermaking: Formation of paper sheet by machines: The dandy roll is a light, open-structured unit covered with wire cloth and placed on the wire between suction boxes, resting lightly upon the wire and the surface of the sheet. Its function is to flatten the top surface of the sheet and improve the finish.…

  • Dane (people)

    Denmark: Ethnic groups: …almost entirely inhabited by ethnic Danes. Few Faroese or Greenlanders have settled in continental Denmark, despite their status as Danish citizens. A small minority of Germans, on the other hand, has been long established and is substantially assimilated. In the early 21st century, important ethnic minorities in the country included…

  • Dane, Clemence (British author)
  • Dane-zaa (people)

    Beaver, a small Athabaskan-speaking North American First Nations (Indian) band living in the mountainous riverine areas of northwestern Alberta and northeastern British Columbia, Canada. In the early 18th century they were driven westward into that area by the expanding Cree, who, armed with guns,

  • Danebury (England, United Kingdom)

    history of Europe: Rituals, religion, and art: …as was the case at Danebury, in southern England, where an Iron Age hill fort was placed at the location of a Late Bronze Age hoard. Hoards were relatively infrequent during the earliest part of the Bronze Age, when they were found mainly in southeastern Europe, Bavaria, and Austria and…

  • Danebury Confederacy (horse racing)

    John Gully: …betting associates were called the Danebury Confederacy.

  • Danegeld (Anglo-Saxon tax)

    Danegeld, a tax levied in Anglo-Saxon England to buy off Danish invaders in the reign of Ethelred II (978–1016); it also designates the recurrent gelds, or taxes, collected by the Anglo-Norman kings. The word is not recorded before the Norman Conquest, the usual earlier (Old English) term being

  • Danehof (Danish national assembly)

    Vordingborg: …favourite meeting place of the Danehof (national assembly), at one of whose meetings the oldest national statute was published (1241). The city was chartered in 1415. In the 14th century Valdemar IV built the curious “Goose Tower,” crowned with a golden (now copper) goose weathercock, on the grounds of his…

  • Danei, Paolo Francesco (Roman Catholic priest)

    Saint Paul of The Cross, ; canonized 1867; feast day October 19), founder of the order of missionary priests known as the Passionists. In 1720 Paul dedicated his life to God and began to experience visions, in the last of which the Virgin Mary appeared to him. He was inspired by this vision to

  • Danel (West Semitic mythological figure)

    Aqhat Epic: The epic records that Danel, a sage and king of the Haranamites, had no son until the god El, in response to Danel’s many prayers and offerings, finally granted him a child, whom Danel named Aqhat. Some time later Danel offered hospitality to the divine craftsman Kothar, who in…

  • Danelaga (region, England, United Kingdom)

    Danelaw, the northern, central, and eastern region of Anglo-Saxon England colonized by invading Danish armies in the late 9th century. In the 11th and 12th centuries, it was recognized that all of eastern England between the Rivers Tees and Thames formed a region in which a distinctive form of

  • Danelagh (region, England, United Kingdom)

    Danelaw, the northern, central, and eastern region of Anglo-Saxon England colonized by invading Danish armies in the late 9th century. In the 11th and 12th centuries, it was recognized that all of eastern England between the Rivers Tees and Thames formed a region in which a distinctive form of

  • Danelaw (region, England, United Kingdom)

    Danelaw, the northern, central, and eastern region of Anglo-Saxon England colonized by invading Danish armies in the late 9th century. In the 11th and 12th centuries, it was recognized that all of eastern England between the Rivers Tees and Thames formed a region in which a distinctive form of

  • Danelis (Greek landowner)

    Greece: Byzantine recovery: …the story of the widow Danelis, a rich landowner whose wealth was almost proverbial in the later 9th century and who may have represented the last in a line of Christianized but semiautonomous Slavic magnates who had dominated the region around Pátrai (Patras) in Achaea. She was a sponsor of…

  • Daneshvar, Simin (Iranian author)

    Simin Daneshvar, Iranian author (born April 28, 1921, Shiraz, Iran—died March 8, 2012, Tehran, Iran), wrote the enduringly popular Savūshūn (1969; published in English as Savushun: A Novel About Modern Iran, 1990, and as A Persian Requiem, 1991), the first modern Persian-language novel written by a

  • Danev, Stoyan (Bulgarian minister)

    Bulgaria: The Balkan Wars: …he resigned in favour of Stoyan Danev, who reflected Ferdinand’s desire for a military solution. On the night of June 16–17 (June 29–30) Bulgarian forces began the Second Balkan War by launching a surprise assault on Greek and Serbian positions in Macedonia. As the Bulgarian attack was being repulsed, Romanian…

  • Danevirke (Danish history)

    Danewirk, ancient frontier earthwork of ramparts and ditches built by the Danes across the neck of Jutland in order to block Frankish expansion into the area. It ultimately extended to an overall length of about 19 miles (30 km) from just south of the town of Schleswig to the marshes of the river

  • Danewerk (Danish history)

    Danewirk, ancient frontier earthwork of ramparts and ditches built by the Danes across the neck of Jutland in order to block Frankish expansion into the area. It ultimately extended to an overall length of about 19 miles (30 km) from just south of the town of Schleswig to the marshes of the river

  • Danewirk (Danish history)

    Danewirk, ancient frontier earthwork of ramparts and ditches built by the Danes across the neck of Jutland in order to block Frankish expansion into the area. It ultimately extended to an overall length of about 19 miles (30 km) from just south of the town of Schleswig to the marshes of the river

  • danewort (plant)

    elderberry: Major species and uses: Danewort, or dwarf, elderberry (S. ebulus), widespread in Eurasia and North Africa, is a perennial with annually herbaceous growth to 1 metre (3 feet). Its clusters of black berries were once a source of dye.

  • Danforth, John (United States senator)

    Holocaust remembrance days: John Danforth that declared April 28–29, 1979, the anniversary of the American liberation of the Dachau concentration camp in 1945, to be Days of Remembrance of Victims of the Holocaust. Danforth deliberately sought a date with American significance and a Saturday and Sunday so that…

  • Danfu (ruler of Zhou)

    China: The history of the Zhou (1046–256 bce): …earliest plausible Zhou ancestor was Danfu, the grandfather of Wenwang. Prior to and during the time of Danfu, the Zhou people seem to have migrated to avoid pressure from powerful neighbours, possibly nomadic people to the north. Under the leadership of Danfu, they settled in the valley of the Wei…

  • dang (genealogy)

    Dagomba: …descent group known as the dang, composed of all descendants of a single grandfather or great-grandfather. In the centralized Dagomba state, only the sons of a previous paramount chief, the ya-na, may rise to that office, which is filled in rotation by one of three divisional chiefs.

  • Dang Xuan Khu (Vietnamese scholar and statesman)

    Truong Chinh, Vietnamese scholar and statesman, a leading North Vietnamese communist intellectual. While a high school student at Nam Dinh, Truong Chinh became an activist in the anticolonialist movement; he joined Ho Chi Minh’s organization, the Vietnamese Revolutionary Youth Association, in 1928,

  • Dangarembga, Tsitsi (Zimbabwean author)

    African literature: English: Tsitsi Dangarembga wrote Nervous Conditions (1988), a story of two Shona girls, Tambudzai and Nyasha, both attempting to find their place in contemporary Zimbabwe. Nyasha has been abroad and wonders about the effect that Westernization has had on her and her family, while Tambudzai is…

  • dangdut (music)

    Dangdut, Indonesian popular music for dancing that combines local music traditions, Indian and Malaysian film musics, and Western rock. The style emerged in Jakarta in the late 1960s and reached the pinnacle of its popularity in the ’70s and ’80s. Dangdut music arose in the mid-20th century from

  • Danger Atoll (atoll, Cook Islands)

    Pukapuka Atoll, one of the northern Cook Islands, a self-governing state in free association with New Zealand in the South Pacific Ocean. A coral formation, it comprises three islets—the main islet of Pukapuka (also called Wale) and the uninhabited Motu Kavata and Motu Koe. Inhabited by Polynesian

  • Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys (album by My Chemical Romance)

    My Chemical Romance: On Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys (2010), a concept album about a postapocalyptic society that functioned as a critique of consumerism, the group combined its glam rock tendencies with an upbeat power-pop sound. The album proved to be a commercial disappointment, however,…

  • Danger Mouse (American musician and record producer)

    Red Hot Chili Peppers: longtime producer Rick Rubin for Danger Mouse (Brian Burton) for its 11th studio album, The Getaway (2016). In 2012 the Red Hot Chili Peppers were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

  • Danger on Peaks (poetry by Snyder)

    Gary Snyder: …all-new poetry in 20 years, Danger on Peaks, a collection that stays true to his earlier work by bringing nature into the reader’s inner vision. A later collection, This Present Moment, appeared in 2015. A longtime advocate of environmental issues, Snyder argued in Back on the Fire: Essays (2007) that…

  • Dangerfield, Rodney (American comedian)

    Rodney Dangerfield, (Jacob Cohen), American comedian (born Nov. 22, 1921, Babylon, N.Y.—died Oct. 5, 2004, Los Angeles, Calif.), immortalized the line “I don’t get no respect” as part of his stand-up comedy act. His perpetually agitated look and hilariously self-deprecating one-liners landed him r

  • Dangerfield, Thomas (British informer)

    Thomas Dangerfield, British informer who falsely accused British Roman Catholics of conspiracy during the panic created by the fictitious Popish Plot of 1678, based on Titus Oates’s allegations that Catholics were plotting to murder King Charles II and take over the government. As a young man,

  • Dangerous (comedy album by Hicks)

    Bill Hicks: King of the Texas Outlaw comedians: In 1990 he released Dangerous, his first comedy album, to glowing reviews.

  • Dangerous (film by Green [1935])

    Alfred E. Green: …which were two Davis melodramas: Dangerous, which won the actress her first Oscar, and The Girl from 10th Avenue.

  • Dangerous Acquaintances (novel by Laclos)

    Dangerous Liaisons, novel by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos, first published in 1782 as Les Liaisons dangereuses. The work, also translated as Dangerous Acquaintances, is considered one of the earliest examples of the psychological novel. Laclos’s first novel, Dangerous Liaisons caused an immediate

  • dangerous goods (law)

    logistics: Traffic management: Hazardous materials movements require special attention. Sometimes only certain routes, warehouses, and vehicular equipment can be used. Communities along the way may have special requirements affecting the movement and storage of the materials. For some hazardous material movements, specialized carriers must be used. Containers and…

  • Dangerous Liaisons (novel by Laclos)

    Dangerous Liaisons, novel by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos, first published in 1782 as Les Liaisons dangereuses. The work, also translated as Dangerous Acquaintances, is considered one of the earliest examples of the psychological novel. Laclos’s first novel, Dangerous Liaisons caused an immediate

  • Dangerous Liaisons (film by Frears [1988])

    Stephen Frears: …Orton, and the American films Dangerous Liaisons (1988) and The Grifters (1990), for which he received an Academy Award nomination. He subsequently directed the comedies The Snapper (1993) and The Van (1996), both based on novels by Roddy Doyle, and Mary Reilly (1996), a retelling of Dr. Jekyll and Mr.…

  • Dangerous Method, A (film by Cronenberg [2011])

    David Cronenberg: Later films: A History of Violence and Eastern Promises: …underworld in London, and in A Dangerous Method (2011), an adaptation of a Christopher Hampton play that explores the historical relationship between Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung. The existential thriller Cosmopolis (2012), which Cronenberg scripted from a novel by Don DeLillo, traces a day in the life of a young…

  • Dangerous Moves (film by Dembo [1984])
  • Dangerous Sports Club (British organization)

    bungee jumping: The Oxford Dangerous Sports Club, inspired by reports of the Pentecost Island divers, made the first Western bungee jumps, and bungee jumping was first offered commercially to the public in New Zealand in 1988.

  • Dangerous Summer, The (work by Hemingway)

    bullfighting: Bullfighting and the arts: …his last major literary work, The Dangerous Summer (1960), was an account of the rivalry between two great matadors, Dominguín and his brother-in-law, Antonio Ordó?ez (who was the son of the bullfighter who inspired the character in The Sun Also Rises). Hemingway’s short story The Capital of the World (1936)…

  • Dangerous Thoughts (work by Hogben)

    Lancelot Thomas Hogben: Scientist, science writer, and foe of eugenics: …active for social causes, in Dangerous Thoughts (1939) he wrote of his resistance to the racist (pre-apartheid) policies in South Africa, where he admitted “coloured” students to his classes and home. Hogben’s discomfort with the racism in South Africa led him to accept a position in 1930 at the London…

  • Dangerously in Love (album by Beyoncé)

    Beyoncé: …pen her first solo album, Dangerously in Love (2003). The album debuted to rave reviews, and, aided by the exuberant single “Crazy in Love,” which featured rapper Jay-Z, it topped charts around the world. In 2004 Beyoncé won five Grammy Awards, including best contemporary R&B album and best female R&B…

  • Dangers of the Nation, The (speech by Garrison)
  • Dangjin Pass (mountain pass, China)

    Altun Mountains: The Dangjin Pass, at the eastern end of the range, is traversed by a road that links eastern Xinjiang (via Gansu province), the Qaidam Basin, and the Tibet Autonomous Region (via Qinghai province).

  • Dangla Mountains (mountains, China)

    Tanggula Mountains, mountain range in the Tibet Autonomous Region, southwestern China. On the high plateau south of the mountains, there are many large salt lakes. In its eastern part the range forms the boundary between Tibet and Qinghai province. Although many peaks are higher than 19,000 feet

  • Dangling Man (work by Bellow)

    Saul Bellow: …with his first two novels, Dangling Man (1944), a story in diary form of a man waiting to be inducted into the army, and The Victim (1947), a subtle study of the relationship between a Jew and a Gentile, each of whom becomes the other’s victim. The Adventures of Augie…

  • Dangote, Aliko (Nigerian businessman)

    Aliko Dangote, Nigerian businessman Aliko Dangote, the founding president (1981) and CEO of the Dangote Group conglomerate, was ranked in 2015 by Forbes magazine as the richest man in Africa, and by 2016 the self-made visionary had increased his net worth to an estimated $14 billion and occupied

  • Dangrêk Mountains (mountains, East Asia)

    Dangrêk Mountains, forested range of hills averaging 1,500–2,000 feet (450–600 m) and dividing Thailand from Cambodia. This east–west-trending range extends from the Mekong River westward for approximately 200 miles (320 km), merging with the highland area near San Kamphaeng, Thailand. Essentially

  • Dangriga (Belize)

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    Tangut, people historically living in what are now the northwestern Chinese provinces of Gansu and Shaanxi and the southwestern portion of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China. They engaged in irrigated agriculture and pastoralism and—taking advantage of their location at the eastern end

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