You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • dormer (architecture)

    Dormer, in architecture, a vertical window that projects from a sloping roof and usually illuminates a bedroom. The term derives from the Latin dormitorium, “sleeping room.” Dormers are set either on the face of the wall or high upon the roof, and their roofs may be gabled, hipped, flat, or with

  • dormice (rodent)

    Dormouse, (family Myoxidae), any of 27 species of small-bodied Eurasian, Japanese, and African rodents. The largest, weighing up to 180 grams (6.3 ounces), is the fat, or edible, dormouse (Glis glis) of Europe and the Middle East, with a body up to 19 cm (7.5 inches) long and a shorter tail up to

  • Dormition (Christianity)

    Assumption: …on August 15 commemorating her dormition, or falling asleep. The feast, which originated in the Byzantine Empire, was brought to the West, where the term Assumption replaced the earlier title to reflect increased emphasis on the glorification of Mary’s body as well as her soul. Although the dormition of Mary…

  • Dormition Cathedral (cathedral, Moscow, Russia)

    Moscow: The Kremlin: The Cathedral of the Assumption is the oldest, built of white stone in 1475–79 in the Italianate-Byzantine style. Its pure, simple, and beautifully proportioned lines and elegant arches are crowned by five golden domes. The Orthodox metropolitans and patriarchs of the 14th to 18th centuries are…

  • dormouse (rodent)

    Dormouse, (family Myoxidae), any of 27 species of small-bodied Eurasian, Japanese, and African rodents. The largest, weighing up to 180 grams (6.3 ounces), is the fat, or edible, dormouse (Glis glis) of Europe and the Middle East, with a body up to 19 cm (7.5 inches) long and a shorter tail up to

  • Dorn, Edward (American author)

    American literature: Experimentation and Beat poetry: Creeley, Robert Duncan, Edward Dorn, and Denise Levertov, treated the poem as an unfolding process rather than a containing form. Olson’s Maximus Poems (1953–68) showed a clear affinity with the jagged line and uneven flow of Pound’s Cantos and Williams’s Paterson. Allen Ginsberg’s incantatory, prophetic “

  • Dornan, Jamie (Northern Irish actor)

    E.L. James: …as a 2015 film starring Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson as Grey and Steele, respectively. Though subject to the same critical flogging as James’s novels, the movie was highly profitable. Two sequels followed, Fifty Shades Darker in 2017 and Fifty Shades Freed in 2018.

  • dornase alfa (biochemistry)

    cystic fibrosis: Medications such as dornase alfa, a recombinant form of the enzyme deoxyribonuclease, are given to thin mucus, facilitating its clearance from the lungs through coughing. In addition, bronchodilators can be used to relax the smooth muscles that line the airways and cause airway constriction, making it easier for…

  • Dornberger, Walter Robert (German engineer)

    Walter Robert Dornberger, engineer who directed construction of the German V-2 rocket during World War II. Dornberger enlisted in the German army in 1914 and was commissioned the next year. After being captured by the French, he was released in 1919 and retained in the small army permitted Germany

  • Dornbirn (Austria)

    Dornbirn, town, western Austria, on the Dornbirner Stream, in the Rhine River valley at the foot of the Bregenzer Forest, just south of Bregenz. First mentioned as Torrinpuirron in 895, it belonged to the counts of Montfort from the late 12th century until it passed to Austria in 1380. It received

  • Dorner, Alexander (German museum curator)

    museum of modern art: History: …by several pioneering directors, including Alexander Dorner in Germany and Alfred H. Barr, Jr., in the United States. Dorner, director (1925–37) of the Landesmuseum in Hanover, was deeply interested in the work of contemporary artists such as Piet Mondrian, László Moholy-Nagy, and Kazimir Malevich and sought to integrate their ideas…

  • Dorner, Isaak August (German theologian)

    Isaak August Dorner, German Protestant theologian who sought to interpret Kantian and post-Kantian thought in terms of traditional Lutheran doctrine. The best known of the English translations of his many works is History of the Development of the Doctrine of the Person of Christ, 5 vol. (1861–63).

  • Dornier Do X (airplane)

    Claudius Dornier: …in 1929 he introduced the Do X, at the time the world’s largest aircraft. With a wingspan of 157 feet (48 metres) and length of 130 feet (40 metres), the Do X was powered by 12 engines and carried 169 passengers; in 1931 it flew from Germany to New York…

  • Dornier, Claude (German engineer)

    Claudius Dornier, pioneer German aircraft designer and builder. Dornier completed his education in 1907 at Munich’s technical college and three years later began working for Ferdinand, Graf von Zeppelin, at the Zeppelin airship factory at Friedrichshafen. In 1911 he designed the first all-metal

  • Dornier, Claudius (German engineer)

    Claudius Dornier, pioneer German aircraft designer and builder. Dornier completed his education in 1907 at Munich’s technical college and three years later began working for Ferdinand, Graf von Zeppelin, at the Zeppelin airship factory at Friedrichshafen. In 1911 he designed the first all-metal

  • doro hakeme (pottery technique)

    Kawai Kanjirō: …characteristics, employing techniques such as doro hakeme (literally, “brush-traits on the mud”), a method of simulating brushstrokes on the clay.

  • Dorobo (people)

    Okiek, a Kalenjin-speaking people of the Southern Nilotic language group inhabiting southwestern Kenya. “Okiek,” a Kalenjin word, and “Dorobo,” derived from a Maasai term, are both sobriquets meaning “hunter.” They refer in a derogatory manner to those who keep no cattle, and hence who are “poor”

  • Doronicum (plant)

    Leopard’s bane, any plant of the genus Doronicum of the family Asteraceae, consisting of about 40 species of perennial herbs native to Eurasia. They have large flower heads with yellow disk flowers and one row of yellow ray flowers. Some leaves are clustered at the base and others alternate along

  • Doroshenko, Peter (Ukrainian leader)

    Russia: Alexis: …new aspect when in 1664 Peter Doroshenko, a new leader, put himself under the protection of the Ottomans. The Turks joined in a number of major military operations, alarming both Poland and Moscow sufficiently to bring them to a truce at Andrusovo (1667). Poland recognized Moscow’s control over eastern Ukraine…

  • Doroshenko, Petro (Ukrainian leader)

    Russia: Alexis: …new aspect when in 1664 Peter Doroshenko, a new leader, put himself under the protection of the Ottomans. The Turks joined in a number of major military operations, alarming both Poland and Moscow sufficiently to bring them to a truce at Andrusovo (1667). Poland recognized Moscow’s control over eastern Ukraine…

  • Dorosoma (fish)

    shad: The gizzard shads (Dorosoma), of both marine waters and freshwaters, have a muscular stomach and filamentous last dorsal fin rays. The Atlantic species (D. cepedianum), also called hickory shad and fall herring, ranges through the southern United States. Others are found in the Indo-Pacific and Australian…

  • Dorosoma cepedianum (fish)

    shad: cepedianum), also called hickory shad and fall herring, ranges through the southern United States. Others are found in the Indo-Pacific and Australian waters. None is of particular economic value.

  • Dorotea, La (work by Vega)

    Lope de Vega: Works: …and poetasters of the day; La Dorotea (1632), a thinly veiled chapter of autobiography cast in dialogue form that grows in critical esteem as the most mature and reflective of his writings; and, listed last because it provides a bridge and key to his plays, the Arte nuevo de hacer…

  • Dorothea and Francesca (painting by Beaux)

    Cecilia Beaux: By 1898, when she completed Dorothea and Francesca, a compositionally complex double portrait, Beaux had proved herself the rival of John Singer Sargent in the art of fashionable portraiture. Beaux was influenced by the French Impressionists, but her work was not imitative of any master. After moving to New York…

  • Dorotheus (Roman jurist)

    Dorotheus, jurist, one of the principal codifiers of Roman law under the emperor Justinian I. Dorotheus helped to compile the Digest, or Pandects (published in 533), and the second edition of the Codex Constitutionum (published in 534). With Tribonian (Tribonianus), head of the Digest’s compilers,

  • Dorothy (fictional character)

    Dorothy, fictional character, the youthful heroine of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900; film 1939), a book-length tale for children by L. Frank Baum, and most of its sequels. Dorothy’s down-to-earth Kansas upbringing serves her well in the fantastic Land of Oz, where she travels in the company of

  • Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize (motion-picture award)

    Robert Redford: …numerous other awards include the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize (2008) and the Presidential Medal of Freedom (2016).

  • Dorothy Gale (fictional character)

    Dorothy, fictional character, the youthful heroine of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900; film 1939), a book-length tale for children by L. Frank Baum, and most of its sequels. Dorothy’s down-to-earth Kansas upbringing serves her well in the fantastic Land of Oz, where she travels in the company of

  • Dorottya (work by Csokonai Vitéz)

    Mihály Csokonai Vitéz: …the first Hungarian comic epic, Dorottya (1799), his most popular work.

  • Dorpat (Estonia)

    Tartu, old university city of southeastern Estonia, on the Ema River. The original settlement of Tarbatu dates from the 5th century; in 1030 the Russians built a fort there called Yuryev. From the 13th to the 16th century, the town was a prosperous member of the Hanseatic League. Then held in turn

  • Dorpat, Treaty of (Europe [1920])

    Juho Kusti Paasikivi: 14, 1920, signed at Tartu, Estonia, the peace treaty with Russia, after warning his government against trying to take advantage of Russia’s temporary weakness. In independent postwar Finland he became prominent as a banker and businessman.

  • D?rpfeld, Friedrich Wilhelm (German educator)

    Friedrich Wilhelm D?rpfeld, German educator who adapted Johann Friedrich Herbart’s ideas to elementary school use and emphasized the social aspects of traditional school subjects. After attending the M?rs teachers’ seminary, D?rpfeld joined the faculty of a school in Barmen. He remained there for

  • D?rpfeld, Wilhelm (German archaeologist)

    Wilhelm D?rpfeld, German archaeologist and authority on Greek architecture who excavated the Mycenaean palace at Tiryns (modern Tirins, Greece) and continued the excavation of the famed German archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann at Hisarl?k, Tur., the site of ancient Troy. After working with

  • Dorr Rebellion (American history)

    Luther v. Borden: Dorr and providing for white manhood suffrage, took control over northwestern Rhode Island. The Dorr government eventually took military action, but its attempt to seize a state arsenal proved unsuccessful. Meanwhile, the more conservative government declared martial law. A suit arising from the conflict reached…

  • Dorr’s Rebellion (speech by Tyler)
  • Dorr’s Rebellion (American history)

    Luther v. Borden: Dorr and providing for white manhood suffrage, took control over northwestern Rhode Island. The Dorr government eventually took military action, but its attempt to seize a state arsenal proved unsuccessful. Meanwhile, the more conservative government declared martial law. A suit arising from the conflict reached…

  • Dorr, Julia Caroline Ripley (American author)

    Julia Caroline Ripley Dorr, American novelist and poet, notable for her novels that portrayed young women lifting themselves from poverty through education and persistence. Julia Ripley married Seneca M. Dorr in 1847. She had enjoyed writing verse since childhood, but none had ever been published

  • Dorr, Thomas Wilson (American politician)

    Thomas Wilson Dorr, American lawyer and constitutional reformer in Rhode Island who led the Dorr Rebellion (also known as Dorr’s Rebellion) in 1842. As a member of the state legislature (from 1834), Dorr failed in his reform efforts. In 1841 he organized the People’s Party, which called a

  • Dorrance, Arthur (American businessman)

    Campbell Soup Company: …partnership, and Campbell joined with Arthur Dorrance to form a new firm, which in 1891 was named the Jos. Campbell Preserve Company (incorporated 1901). In 1894 Campbell retired, and three years later Dorrance’s nephew, J.T. Dorrance (1873–1930), joined the company and introduced the idea of condensed soups. The soups with…

  • Dorrance, Arthur C. (American businessman)

    Campbell Soup Company: His brother Arthur C. Dorrance became president of Franco-American Food Co., when acquired in 1921, and president of Campbell Soup in 1930. After World War II the company gradually began to diversify by acquiring producers of juice, frozen foods, bakery goods, and candy. It also established subsidiary…

  • Dorrance, J. T. (American businessman)

    Campbell Soup Company: …three years later Dorrance’s nephew, J.T. Dorrance (1873–1930), joined the company and introduced the idea of condensed soups. The soups with the familiar red-and-white label appeared in 1898 and, after winning the Gold Medallion at the Paris Exposition in 1900, were labeled with that medallion thereafter.

  • Dorrego, Manuel (president of Argentina)

    Argentina: Presidency of Rivadavia: …given to a federalist, Colonel Manuel Dorrego. Dorrego was backed by local interest groups whose political spokesman was the great landowner Juan Manuel de Rosas, who had been named commander of the rural militia. Dorrego made peace with Brazil, and in 1828 the disputed eastern province was constituted as the…

  • Dorris, Michael Anthony (American writer)

    Michael Anthony Dorris, American writer whose best-known book, the 1989 National Book Award-winning The Broken Cord, chronicled the struggle his adopted son faced as a result of fetal alcohol syndrome; suffering from chronic depression, separated from his wife, writer Louise Erdrich, and facing

  • Dorrit, Amy (fictional character)

    Arthur Clennam: …kindly middle-aged man who loves Amy Dorrit, the heroine of Charles Dickens’s novel Little Dorrit (1855–57).

  • dorsal aorta (anatomy)

    circulatory system: Chordata: …blood is collected into two dorsal aortas that continue forward into the snout and backward to unite behind the pharynx. The single median vessel thus formed branches to vascular spaces and the intestinal capillaries. Blood from the gut collects in a median subintestinal vein and flows forward to the liver,…

  • dorsal cochlear nucleus (anatomy)

    human ear: Ascending pathways: …and is divided into the dorsal and ventral cochlear nucleus. Each cochlear nerve fibre branches at the cochlear nucleus, sending one branch to the dorsal and the other branch to the ventral cochlear nucleus.

  • dorsal column (anatomy)

    human sensory reception: Nerve function: …along the back (in the dorsal columns) of the spinal cord. Afferent fibres enter the cord from the cutaneous nerves and ascend without synaptic break in one (the ipsilateral) dorsal column. This is a very rapidly conducting pathway shared by fibres that mediate sensations of deep pressure and kinesthesis. Other…

  • dorsal fin (animal appendage)

    cetacean: Locomotor adaptations: …almost all cetaceans possess a dorsal fin that serves as a keel. The dorsal fin and flukes are composed of connective tissue, not bone. Other connective tissue, such as external ears, has been lost, and the male genitalia have moved internally.

  • dorsal horn (anatomy)

    nerve: …the posterior gray column (dorsal horn) of the cord or ascend to nuclei in the lower part of the brain. Immediately lateral to the spinal ganglia the two roots unite into a common nerve trunk, which includes both sensory and motor fibres; the branches of this trunk distribute both…

  • dorsal nerve cord (anatomy)

    chordate: General features: In chordates the main nerve cord is single and lies above the alimentary tract, while in other phyla it is paired and lies below the gut. Cephalochordates and vertebrates are segmented, as are the annelids and their relatives; however, segmentation in the two groups probably evolved independently. The gill…

  • dorsal ramus (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Structural components of spinal nerves: …nerve divides into ventral and dorsal rami. All dorsal rami (with the exception of those from C1, S4, S5, and Coc1) have medial and lateral branches, which innervate deep back muscles and overlying skin. The medial and lateral branches of the dorsal rami of spinal nerves C2–C8 supply both the…

  • dorsal rib (anatomy)

    rib: The upper (dorsal) set of ribs is believed to have evolved into the ribs of land vertebrates. Attachment of ribs to a breastbone (sternum) to form a rib cage appeared first in reptiles. In the primitive condition, ribs were attached to all vertebrae; this is still true…

  • dorsal root (anatomy)

    ganglion: The dorsal root ganglia contain the cell bodies of afferent nerve fibres (those carrying impulses toward the central nervous system); efferent neurons (carrying motor impulses away from the central nervous system) are present in the ventral root ganglia.

  • dorsal scapular nerve (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Brachial plexus: …and pectoral muscles include the dorsal scapular (to the rhomboid muscles), suprascapular (to supraspinatus and infraspinatus), medial and lateral pectoral (to pectoralis minor and major), long thoracic (to serratus anterior), thoracodorsal (to latissimus dorsi), and subscapular (to teres major and

  • dorsal sensory root (anatomy)

    ganglion: The dorsal root ganglia contain the cell bodies of afferent nerve fibres (those carrying impulses toward the central nervous system); efferent neurons (carrying motor impulses away from the central nervous system) are present in the ventral root ganglia.

  • dorsal venous arch (anatomy)

    human cardiovascular system: Inferior vena cava and its tributaries: … is drained primarily by the dorsal venous arch, which crosses the top of the foot not far from the base of the toes. The arch is connected with veins that drain the sole. Superficially the lower leg is drained by the large and small saphenous veins, which are continuations of…

  • Dorsale Guineénne (plateau, Africa)

    Guinea Highlands, mountainous plateau extending from the southern Fouta Djallon highlands through southeastern Guinea, northern Sierra Leone and Liberia, and northwestern C?te d’Ivoire. The plateau is composed of granitic gneisses and quartzite and averages more than 1,500 feet (460 metres) in

  • dorsalis pedis artery (anatomy)

    human cardiovascular system: The aorta and its principal branches: …ankle, where it becomes the dorsalis pedis artery, which supplies the foot.

  • Dorset (county, England, United Kingdom)

    Dorset, administrative, geographic, and historic county of southwestern England. It is bordered by the English Channel (south) and the counties of Devon (west), Hampshire (east), and Somerset and Wiltshire (both north). The historic town of Dorchester, in the south, is the county seat. The

  • Dorset culture (archaeology)

    Dorset culture, prehistoric culture of Greenland and the Canadian eastern Arctic as far south as present-day Newfoundland. It existed from approximately 800 bc to ad 1300. Its name comes from excavations made at Cape Dorset at Baffin Island. Several theories about the origin of Dorset culture have

  • Dorset dialect (language)

    William Barnes: His first Dorset dialect poems were published in the Dorset County Chronicle (1833–34). His many books include an Anglo-Saxon primer (1849), An Outline of English Speech-Craft (1878), Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect (two series: 1844, 1862), Hwomely Rhymes (1859), and Poems of Rural Life…

  • Dorset Field Club (golf club, Dorset, Vermont, United States)

    golf: The United States and Canada: …formed in 1884; and the Dorset Field Club in Dorset, Vermont, claims to have been organized and to have laid out its course in 1886, although in both instances written records are lacking. The Foxburg Golf Club has provided strong support for the claim that it was organized in 1887…

  • Dorset, Charles Sackville, 6th earl of (English noble)

    Charles Sackville, 6th earl of Dorset, typical courtier of the reign of British king Charles II, a munificent patron to many men of letters, and a friend of John Dryden. Dorset was himself a poet whose satires in heroic couplets anticipated and influenced the style of Alexander

  • Dorset, Edmund Beaufort, 1st Earl of (English noble)

    Edmund Beaufort, 2nd duke of Somerset, English nobleman and Lancastrian leader whose quarrel with Richard, duke of York, helped precipitate the Wars of the Roses (1455–85) between the houses of Lancaster and York. He was a member of the Beaufort family, which in the 1430s obtained control—with

  • Dorset, Henry Beaufort, 2nd earl of (English noble)

    Henry Beaufort, 3rd duke of Somerset, leading Lancastrian in the English Wars of the Roses. He was the eldest son of Edmund Beaufort, the 2nd duke. As duke of Somerset, marquess of Dorset, and titular count of Mortain, he was the victorious Lancastrian commander at the battles of Wakefield (1460)

  • Dorset, Henry Grey, 3rd Marquess of (English noble)

    Henry Grey, duke of Suffolk, father of Lady Jane Grey; his opposition to Queen Mary I of England and his role in Sir Thomas Wyatt’s rebellion led to his execution. The son of Thomas Grey, 2nd marquess of Dorset, he succeeded to the marquessate in 1530 and, in 1534, with the approval of King Henry

  • Dorset, Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of (English statesman, poet, and dramatist)

    Thomas Sackville, 1st earl of Dorset, English statesman, poet, and dramatist, remembered largely for his share in two achievements of significance in the development of Elizabethan poetry and drama: the collection A Myrrour for Magistrates (1563) and the tragedy Gorboduc (1561). Sackville settled

  • Dorsetshire (British ship)

    Bismarck: …three torpedoes from the cruiser Dorsetshire. Of the some 2,300 crew aboard the Bismarck, only about 110 survived.

  • Dorsett, Anthony Drew, Sr. (American football player)

    Tony Dorsett, American gridiron football player who is widely considered one of the best running backs in the sport’s history. A four-year starter and three-time All-American at the University of Pittsburgh, Dorsett set collegiate records for the most 100-yard rushing performances in a season (11)

  • Dorsett, Tony (American football player)

    Tony Dorsett, American gridiron football player who is widely considered one of the best running backs in the sport’s history. A four-year starter and three-time All-American at the University of Pittsburgh, Dorsett set collegiate records for the most 100-yard rushing performances in a season (11)

  • Dorsey, George A. (American anthropologist)

    George A. Dorsey, early U.S. ethnographer of North American Indians, especially the Mandan tribe. His investigations of the Plains Indians included early population accounts of the area. He is best known for his last work, Man’s Own Show; Civilization (1931), as well as for his popular anthropology

  • Dorsey, George Amos (American anthropologist)

    George A. Dorsey, early U.S. ethnographer of North American Indians, especially the Mandan tribe. His investigations of the Plains Indians included early population accounts of the area. He is best known for his last work, Man’s Own Show; Civilization (1931), as well as for his popular anthropology

  • Dorsey, Jack (American Web developer and entrepreneur)

    Jack Dorsey, American Web developer and entrepreneur who, with Evan Williams and Christopher Stone, cofounded (2006) the online microblogging service Twitter. As a teenager, Dorsey created taxi-dispatching software that was adopted by taxicab companies. He attended New York University before moving

  • Dorsey, Jack; Stone, Christopher Isaac (Biz); and Williams, Evan (cofounders of Twitter)

    Jack Dorsey, Christopher Isaac (“Biz”) Stone, and Evan Williams, Twitter—the online messaging service cofounded by social-media entrepreneur Evan Williams, social-networking expert Christopher Isaac (“Biz”) Stone, and messaging-software engineer Jack Dorsey—found itself in the media spotlight in

  • Dorsey, James Francis (American musician)

    Jimmy Dorsey , American musician who—both independently and with his brother Tommy—led one of the most popular big bands of the swing era. He was also a highly talented saxophone and clarinet player. Along with his brother, Dorsey received his first musical training from his father, who was a music

  • Dorsey, James Owen (American ethnologist)

    James Owen Dorsey, American ethnologist known principally for his linguistic and ethnographic studies of the Siouan tribes. Dorsey was ordained a deacon of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1871 and proselytized among the Ponca tribe in the Dakota Territory. Adept in classical linguistics, he

  • Dorsey, Jimmy (American musician)

    Jimmy Dorsey , American musician who—both independently and with his brother Tommy—led one of the most popular big bands of the swing era. He was also a highly talented saxophone and clarinet player. Along with his brother, Dorsey received his first musical training from his father, who was a music

  • Dorsey, Rebecca Lee (American physician)

    Rebecca Lee Dorsey, U.S. physician who was a pioneer in the field of endocrinology and the study of hormones. She was one of the first female doctors to practice medicine in Los Angeles. According to her unpublished memoirs (which are thought to contain significant embelishments), Dorsey was

  • Dorsey, Thomas Andrew (American musician)

    Thomas Andrew Dorsey, American songwriter, singer, and pianist whose many up-tempo blues arrangements of gospel music hymns earned him the title of “Father of Gospel Music.” Dorsey was the son of a revivalist preacher. He was influenced in childhood by blues pianists in the Atlanta, Ga., area and

  • Dorsey, Thomas Francis, Jr. (American musician)

    Tommy Dorsey, American musician who—both independently and with his brother Jimmy—led several of the most popular big bands of the swing era. He was also a highly respected and influential trombonist. Both brothers received their first musical training from their father, a music teacher and

  • Dorsey, Tommy (American musician)

    Tommy Dorsey, American musician who—both independently and with his brother Jimmy—led several of the most popular big bands of the swing era. He was also a highly respected and influential trombonist. Both brothers received their first musical training from their father, a music teacher and

  • Dorsland Trek (South African history)

    Kalahari Desert: Study and exploration: …party of Boers in the Dorsland (“Thirstland”) Trek crossed the Kalahari from the Transvaal to central Angola by a circuitous route, losing along the way about 250 people and 9,000 cattle, largely from thirst. The introduction of motor vehicles in the 20th century greatly improved transport into the Kalahari, but…

  • dorsocaudal medial entorhinal cortex (anatomy)

    Edvard I. Moser: …of cells specifically in the dorsocaudal medial entorhinal cortex (dMEC) of the rat brain via electrodes that had been positioned precisely within the region. The activity of the cells in the dMEC turned out to be related to the position of the rat in its enclosure, similar to O’Keefe’s finding…

  • dorsopathy (pathology)

    Back pain, discomfort or sometimes debilitating suffering associated with an injury or some other affliction of the back, the posterior (rear) portion of the body that extends from the shoulders to the hips. Back pain is a ubiquitous complaint and a leading cause of disability worldwide. To

  • Dorst, Tankred (German author)

    Tankred Dorst, German author whose experiments with theatrical forms, translations, and political plays and novels marked him as an original. Dorst studied at the University of Munich, where he became interested in marionettes and “illusionary theatre,” in which reality is seen as merely another

  • Dorsten (Germany)

    Dorsten, city, North Rhine–Westphalia Land (state), western Germany. It lies on the Lippe River and the Wesel-Datteln Canal. A village in Roman times, Dorsten was chartered by the archbishops of Cologne in 1251 and fortified in the 14th century. As a monastic centre it was a stronghold of the

  • dorsum (anatomy)

    tongue: The top surface, or dorsum, contains numerous projections of the mucous membrane called papillae. They contain taste buds, which are sensitive to chemical constituents of food, and serous glands that secrete some of the fluid in saliva, a substance that moistens the oral cavity and helps lubricate food particles.…

  • Dort (Netherlands)

    Dordrecht, gemeente (municipality), southwestern Netherlands, at the divergence of the Merwede, Noord, Oude Maas (Old Meuse), and Dordtse Kil rivers. Founded in 1008, it was the residence of the counts of Holland until 1203 and was first chartered in 1220. It was fortified in 1271, and, although

  • Dort, canons of (Dutch history)

    Netherlands Reformed Church: It produced the canons of Dort, which condemned the theology of the Arminians (also called the Remonstrants) and set forth a strict interpretation of predestination. These canons, along with the Belgic Confession and the Heidelberg Catechism, came to constitute the theological basis of the Dutch Reformed Church.

  • Dort, Synod of (Netherlands church assembly)

    Synod of Dort, assembly of the Reformed Church of the Netherlands that met at Dort (in full Dordrecht) from Nov. 13, 1618, to May 9, 1619. The synod tried to settle disputes concerning Arminianism. In 1610 the Dutch followers of Jacobus Arminius presented to the States General a Remonstrance in

  • Dorta, J. (Swiss translator)

    Swiss literature: Dorta. There is also a rich variety of popular songs, especially of the religious and political kind. Owing to its geographical distribution Romansh literature is essentially regional in character. Nevertheless, the anthologist Caspar Decurtins; the poets Peider Lansel, Jon Guidon, and Artur Caflisch; and the…

  • Dortmund (Germany)

    Dortmund, city, North Rhine–Westphalia Land (state), western Germany. Located at the southern terminus of the Dortmund-Ems Canal, it has extensive port installations. First mentioned as Throtmanni in 885, Dortmund became a free imperial city in 1220 and later joined the Hanseatic League. Its

  • Dortmund-Ems Canal (canal, Germany)

    Dortmund-Ems Canal, important commercial canal in western Germany linking the Ruhr industrial area with the North Sea near Emden. The canal was opened in 1899 and is about 269 km (167 miles) long. It extends from Dortmund, its southern terminus, to meet the Rhine-Herne Canal at Henrichenburg. At

  • Dortmund-Ems-Kanal (canal, Germany)

    Dortmund-Ems Canal, important commercial canal in western Germany linking the Ruhr industrial area with the North Sea near Emden. The canal was opened in 1899 and is about 269 km (167 miles) long. It extends from Dortmund, its southern terminus, to meet the Rhine-Herne Canal at Henrichenburg. At

  • Dortmunder beer (alcoholic beverage)

    beer: Types of beer: Dortmunder is a pale lager of Germany, and Munich has become associated with dark, strong, slightly sweet beers with less hop character. The dark colour comes from highly roasted malt, and other characteristic flavours arise during the decoction mashing process. Bock is an even stronger,…

  • D?rtyol (Turkey)

    D?rtyol, town, southern Turkey. It is located at the head of the Gulf of Iskenderun. The town’s importance lies in its function as a terminal where Mediterranean tankers can be loaded with oil transported from the petroleum fields of western Asia. A pipeline, 40 inches (100 cm) in diameter and

  • Dorudontinae (fossil mammal subfamily)

    basilosaurid: …are separated into four subfamilies: Dorudontinae, Basilosaurinae, Kekenodontinae, and Stromeriinae. The earliest dorudontines were the earliest basilosaurids, with long skulls and relatively short bodies. Basilosaurines are the archetypal basilosaurids, with elongated vertebrae and long tails. The kekenodontines consist of the single genus Kekenodon, which was only poorly known and is…

  • Dorval (Quebec, Canada)

    Dorval, city, Montréal region, southern Quebec province, Canada, on ?le de Montréal (Montreal Island). It is a southwestern suburb of Montreal city facing Lac Saint-Louis, an extension of the St. Lawrence River. Offshore to the south is ?le Dorval, a summer resort. Montréal–Pierre Elliott Trudeau

  • Dorval, Marie (French actress)

    Alfred-Victor, count de Vigny: Maturity and disillusionment.: …liaison (1831–38) with the actress Marie Dorval, for whom he was to create the role of Kitty Bell in the play Chatterton in 1835. He accused Dorval of deceiving him and of having maintained an overaffectionate friendship with the writer George Sand. His relationship with Dorval left Vigny profoundly embittered.

  • Dorval; or, The Test of Virtue (work by Diderot)

    comédie larmoyante: , Dorval; or, The Test of Virtue). The comédie larmoyante also set the stage for the appearance of melodrama in the late 18th century.

Your preference has been recorded
Get a Premium membership for 30% off!
Save 30% with our Memorial Day Sale!
港台一级毛片免费观看