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  • Donck, Adriaen van der (Dutch colonist)

    Yonkers: Adriaen van der Donck—known as De Jonkheer, a courtesy title roughly equivalent to “young lord” or “gentleman” (whence, phonetically, Yonkers)—was given a land grant in 1646 and established the patroonship (estate) of Colendonck in 1652. The lands were then bought by Frederick Philipse, who built…

  • Donders’ law (ophthalmology)

    Frans Cornelis Donders: …what is now known as Donders’ law: the rotation of the eye around the line of sight is involuntary.

  • Donders, Frans Cornelis (Dutch ophthalmologist)

    Frans Cornelis Donders, ophthalmologist, the most eminent of 19th-century Dutch physicians, whose investigations of the physiology and pathology of the eye made possible a scientific approach to the correction of refractive disabilities such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism.

  • Doneck (Ukraine)

    Donetsk, city, southeastern Ukraine, on the headwaters of the Kalmius River. In 1872 an ironworks was founded there by a Welshman, John Hughes (from whom the town’s pre-Revolutionary name Yuzivka was derived), to produce iron rails for the growing Russian rail network. Later steel rails were made.

  • Donegal (county, Ireland)

    Donegal, most northerly county of Ireland, in the historic province of Ulster. The small village of Lifford in eastern Donegal is the county seat. Donegal is bounded on the west and north by the Atlantic Ocean, on the east by Lough (lake) Foyle and Northern Ireland, and on the south by Northern

  • Donegal (Ireland)

    Donegal, seaport and market town, County Donegal, Ireland, on the River Eske at the head of Donegal Bay. It is famed for its historic associations and picturesque environs. South of the town are the ruins of the Franciscan Donegal Abbey (founded 1474). Donegal Castle, a stronghold of the

  • Donegal Abbey (abbey, Donegal, Ireland)

    Donegal: …are the ruins of the Franciscan Donegal Abbey (founded 1474). Donegal Castle, a stronghold of the O’Donnells, was rebuilt in the early 17th century. The town is noted for its handwoven tweed. Pop. (2002) 2,453; (2011) 2,607.

  • Donegall, Rory O’Donnell, baron of (Irish chieftain)

    Rory O’Donnell, 1st earl of Tyrconnell, Irish chieftain who rebelled against the English and died in exile. The second son of Sir Aodh O’Donnell, lord of Tyrconnell, he allied with his elder brother Hugh Roe O’Donnell, who transferred his authority as chief to Rory upon leaving for Spain. In 1602

  • Donegan, Anthony James (British musician)

    Anthony James Donegan, (“Lonnie”), Scottish musician (born April 29, 1931, Glasgow, Scot.—died Nov. 3, 2002, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, Eng.), became known as the king of skiffle—a blend of music styles that encompassed folk, country, jazz, blues, and jug band—and in the process served as the i

  • Donegan, Dorothy (American musician)

    Dorothy Donegan, American jazz pianist who was known for her flamboyant showmanship, her outrageous humour, and the mixture of musical styles she incorporated into her performances (b. April 6, 1922, Chicago, Ill.--d. May 19, 1998, Los Angeles,

  • Donegan, Lonnie (British musician)

    Anthony James Donegan, (“Lonnie”), Scottish musician (born April 29, 1931, Glasgow, Scot.—died Nov. 3, 2002, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, Eng.), became known as the king of skiffle—a blend of music styles that encompassed folk, country, jazz, blues, and jug band—and in the process served as the i

  • Donelaitis, Kristijonas (Lithuanian poet)

    Kristijonas Donelaitis, Lutheran pastor and poet who was one of the greatest Lithuanian poets and one of the first to be appreciated outside his country. Donelaitis studied theology and classical languages at the University of K?nigsberg (1736–40) and in 1743 became pastor of the village of

  • Donelson, Andrew J. (American politician)

    United States presidential election of 1856: Campaign and results: …as the Know-Nothing nominee, with Andrew J. Donelson of Tennessee as his running mate; the Whigs united behind Fillmore rather than proposing their own candidate.

  • Donelson, John (American explorer)

    Nashville: History: …1780 by another group under John Donelson. Fort Nashborough, built at the site and named for American Revolutionary War general Francis Nash, became the centre of the new community. (A replica of the fort stands in a park along the Cumberland River.) Henderson is also credited with having written the…

  • Donelson, Rachel (wife of Andrew Jackson)

    Rachel Jackson, wife of U.S. Army general and president-elect Andrew Jackson, who became the seventh president of the United States (1829–37). She died less than three months before his inauguration. Rachel, the daughter of Colonel John Donelson, a surveyor, and Rachel Stockley Donelson, enjoyed an

  • Donen, Stanley (American film and dance director)

    Stanley Donen, American motion-picture director and choreographer who was one of the most influential directors of movie musicals in the 1940s and ’50s. Donen, who was the son of a dress-shop owner, faced prejudice growing up in one of the few Jewish families in his South Carolina community and

  • Donenfeld, Harry (publisher)
  • donepezil hydrochloride (drug)

    anticholinesterase: …donepezil, which is marketed as Aricept, was found to marginally benefit some persons with early-onset Alzheimer disease, its use has been primarily limited to individuals with late-stage disease, for whom the benefits outweigh the risks of side effects.

  • Donerail (racehorse)

    Kentucky Derby: Records: …history occurred in 1913, when Donerail won at odds of 91–1. The first filly to win the Kentucky Derby was Regret in 1915; Genuine Risk (1980) and Winning Colors (1988) are the only other fillies to have won.

  • Donets Basin (region, Europe)

    Donets Basin, large mining and industrial region of southeastern Europe, notable for its large coal reserves. The coalfield lies in southeastern Ukraine and in the adjoining region of southwestern Russia. The principal exploited area of the field covers nearly 9,000 square miles (23,300 square km)

  • Donets River (river, Europe)

    Donets River, a tributary of the Don River, southwestern Russia and eastern Ukraine. The Donets is 650 miles (1,050 km) long and drains a basin of 39,000 square miles (100,000 square km). Rising in the Central Russian Upland, it flows south past Belgorod, Russia; enters Ukraine and passes to the

  • Donetsk (Ukraine)

    Donetsk, city, southeastern Ukraine, on the headwaters of the Kalmius River. In 1872 an ironworks was founded there by a Welshman, John Hughes (from whom the town’s pre-Revolutionary name Yuzivka was derived), to produce iron rails for the growing Russian rail network. Later steel rails were made.

  • Donetsko-Yuryevsky ironworks (industrial site, Alchevsk, Ukraine)

    Alchevsk: …with the establishment of the Donetsko-Yuryevsky ironworks. The plant developed into a large, integrated ironworks and steelworks, which was expanded greatly in the 1950s and ’60s. The city has been a major bituminous-coal mining centre, with coke-chemical and metalworking industries. Pop. (2001) 119,193; (2005 est.) 116,954.

  • Donetsky Basseyn (region, Europe)

    Donets Basin, large mining and industrial region of southeastern Europe, notable for its large coal reserves. The coalfield lies in southeastern Ukraine and in the adjoining region of southwestern Russia. The principal exploited area of the field covers nearly 9,000 square miles (23,300 square km)

  • Donetskyy Baseyn (region, Europe)

    Donets Basin, large mining and industrial region of southeastern Europe, notable for its large coal reserves. The coalfield lies in southeastern Ukraine and in the adjoining region of southwestern Russia. The principal exploited area of the field covers nearly 9,000 square miles (23,300 square km)

  • Dong (people)

    Dong, an ethnic minority of China found in southeastern Guizhou province and in neighbouring Zhuang Autonomous Region of Guangxi and Hunan province. According to most linguists the Dong speak a Kam-Sui language that is closely related to the Tai languages, and they call themselves Kam. The Dong

  • Dong Ah Construction Industrial Co., Ltd. (South Korean company)
  • Dong Duong (archaeological site, Vietnam)

    Southeast Asian arts: Art of the northern capital: 4th–11th century: …most important of these is Dong Duong, in Quang Nam. It is a ruined Buddhist monastery complex of the late 9th century, conceived on the most beautifully elaborated plan of structured space in Champa. The architectural detail is distinguished from the My Son work by its greater emphasis upon the…

  • Dong Hai (sea, Pacific Ocean)

    East China Sea, arm of the Pacific Ocean bordering the East Asian mainland and extending northeastward from the South China Sea, to which it is connected by the shallow Taiwan Strait between Taiwan and mainland China. The East China Sea and the South China Sea together form the China Sea. The East

  • Dong Han dynasty (Chinese history [25-220])

    China: Dong (Eastern) Han: The Han house was restored by Liu Xiu, better known as Guangwudi, who reigned from 25 to 57 ce. His claim had been contested by another member of the Liu house—Liu Xuan, better known as Liu Gengshi—who had been actually enthroned for…

  • Dong Han Suzong (emperor of Han dynasty)

    Zhangdi, posthumous name (shi) of an emperor (reigned ad 75–88) of the Han dynasty (206 bc–ad 220), whose reign marked the beginning of the dissipation of Han rule. The Zhangdi emperor’s reign was the third since the Liu family had restored the Han imperial dynasty following Wang Mang’s usurpation

  • Dong Jianhua (Chinese businessman and politician)

    Tung Chee-hwa, Chinese businessman and politician and first chief executive (1997–2005) of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (S.A.R.) of China. Tung was the son of C.Y. Tung, founder of Orient Overseas—now part of Orient Overseas (International) Limited (OOIL), one of the world’s largest

  • Dong Jin dynasty (Chinese history)

    Dong Jin, second phase of the Jin dynasty (265–420 ce), ruling China from 317 to 420 ce and forming one of the Six

  • Dong Kinh (national capital, Vietnam)

    Hanoi, city, capital of Vietnam. The city is situated in northern Vietnam on the western bank of the Red River, about 85 miles (140 km) inland from the South China Sea. In addition to being the national capital, Hanoi is also a province-level municipality (thanh pho), administered by the central

  • Dong Nai River (river, Vietnam)

    Dong Nai River, river rising in the central highlands (Annamese Cordillera) of southern Vietnam, northwest of Da Lat. Near its source the river has rapids and is known as the Da Dung River. It flows west and southwest for about 300 miles (480 km), joining the Saigon River southwest of Bien Hoa. At

  • Dong Qichang (Chinese artist)

    Dong Qichang, Chinese painter, calligrapher, and theoretician who was one of the finest artists of the late Ming period. The most distinguished connoisseur of his day, Dong Qichang set forward ideas that have continued to influence Chinese aesthetic theory. Dong Qichang was born to a poor but

  • Dong Son culture (prehistoric culture, Indochina)

    Dong Son culture, important prehistoric culture of Indochina; it is named for a village in northern Vietnam where many of its remains have been found. The Dong Son site shows that bronze culture was introduced into Indochina from the north, probably about 300 bc, the date of the earliest Dong Son

  • Dong Thap Muoi (region, Vietnam-Cambodia)

    Thap Muoi Plain, low, basinlike, alluvial swampy region, a northwestern extension of the Mekong delta, in southern Vietnam and eastern Cambodia. It is bounded on the southeast by the Tien Giang River, the main channel of the Mekong River, and also drains to a lesser extent into the parallel Vam Co

  • Dong Yuan (Chinese painter)

    Juran: …was supposedly a follower of Dong Yuan, a similarly little-known painter of the Five Dynasties in the court at Nanjing. No certain authentic works survive, but those considered to be in his style and in that of his teacher Dong make use of relaxed fibrous brushstrokes, wet ink washes, and…

  • Dong Zhongshu (Chinese scholar)

    Dong Zhongshu, scholar instrumental in establishing Confucianism in 136 bce as the state cult of China and as the basis of official political philosophy—a position it was to hold for 2,000 years. As a philosopher, Dong merged the Confucian and Yinyang schools of thought. As a chief minister to the

  • Dong Zhou dynasty (Chinese dynasty)

    education: Dong (Eastern) Zhou (770–256 bce): ” This was a period of social change brought about by the disintegration of the feudal order, the breakdown of traditional loyalties, the rise of cities and urban civilization, and the growth of commerce.

  • Dong Zhuo (Chinese general)

    Dong Zhuo, general whose seizure of power and tyrannical rule ended the Han dynasty (206 bce–220 ce) and divided the Chinese empire. In 190 ce Dong Zhuo burned Luoyang, the capital, and removed himself and the emperor to the ancient capital of Chang’an (now Xi’an). At his fief he built the walled

  • Dong, Pham Van (Vietnamese revolutionary)

    Pham Van Dong, Vietnamese revolutionary (born March 1, 1906, Quang Ngai province, Annam [now Vietnam]—died April 29, 2000, Hanoi, Vietnam), was an architect of Vietnam’s communist revolution; he was prime minister of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) from 1955 to 1976 and of the So

  • Dongan, Thomas, 2nd Earl of Limerick (British colonial governor)

    Thomas Dongan, 2nd earl of Limerick, British colonial governor of New York under Charles II and James II. A Roman Catholic and a member of a royalist family, Dongan was exiled after the English Civil Wars (1642–51) and served in an Irish regiment of the French army. Recalled to England in 1677, he

  • Dongba (religion)

    Naxi: Their indigenous religion, called Dongba, is a form of shamanism influenced by Tibetan Buddhism. Matriarchal family structure predominated among the Naxi until the mid-20th century, and remnants of it can still be observed.

  • Dongbei (historical region, China)

    Manchuria, historical region of northeastern China. Strictly speaking, it consists of the modern provinces (sheng) of Liaoning (south), Jilin (central), and Heilongjiang (north). Often, however, the northeastern portion of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region also is included. Manchuria is bounded

  • Dongbei Pingyuan (plain, China)

    Northeast Plain, heart of the central lowland of northeastern China (Manchuria). It has a surface area of about 135,000 square miles (350,000 square km), all of which lies below 1,000 feet (300 metres) above sea level. The plain, largely the product of erosion from the surrounding highlands, is

  • Dongchang (Chinese police agency)

    Yongle: Accession to the throne: …special eunuch agency called the Eastern Depot (Dongchang) charged with ferreting out treasonable activities. Although it did not become notorious in his own reign, it came to be a hated and feared secret police in collaboration with the imperial bodyguard in later decades and centuries.

  • Dongchuan (China)

    Yunnan: Resources and power: The copper industry around Dongchuan, which supplied most of the metal for minting coins in the Qing (Manchu) dynasty (1644–1911/12), has been modernized and expanded. This led to the creation of a special economic district at Dongchuan, northeast of Kunming. Dongchuan is also one of the centres of lead…

  • Dongen, Cornelis Theodorus Marie van (French painter)

    Kees van Dongen, Dutch-born French painter and printmaker who was one of the leading Fauvists and was particularly renowned for his stylized, sensuously rendered portraits of women. Van Dongen had artistic leanings early in his youth. He attended the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Rotterdam, Neth.,

  • Dongen, Kees van (French painter)

    Kees van Dongen, Dutch-born French painter and printmaker who was one of the leading Fauvists and was particularly renowned for his stylized, sensuously rendered portraits of women. Van Dongen had artistic leanings early in his youth. He attended the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Rotterdam, Neth.,

  • Dongfang Shuo Stealing the Peaches of Longevity (tapestry)

    tapestry: Eastern Asia: Many kesi, such as Dongfang Shuo Stealing the Peaches of Longevity, imitated paintings and were mounted on scrolls or album leaves in the same manner as the pictures they copied. Tapestries to cover large wall surfaces, such as the kesi (7 feet 3 inches by 5 feet 9 inches;…

  • Donghae (sea, Pacific Ocean)

    Sea of Japan, marginal sea of the western Pacific Ocean. It is bounded by Japan and Sakhalin Island to the east and by Russia and Korea on the Asian mainland to the west. Its area is 377,600 square miles (978,000 square km). It has a mean depth of 5,748 feet (1,752 metres) and a maximum depth of

  • Donghai (island, China)

    Leizhou Peninsula: …the east coast, Naozhou and Donghai, it forms two bays, Leizhou to the south of the islands and Zhanjiang to the north. The largest city on the peninsula is Zhanjiang, which faces the bay of the same name. Administratively, the peninsula forms part of Zhanjiang municipality. The peninsula forms part…

  • Donghui (people)

    Manchu, people who lived for many centuries mainly in Manchuria (now Northeast) and adjacent areas of China and who in the 17th century conquered China and ruled for more than 250 years. The term Manchu dates from the 16th century, but it is certain that the Manchu are descended from a group of

  • Dongjia (people)

    Dong, an ethnic minority of China found in southeastern Guizhou province and in neighbouring Zhuang Autonomous Region of Guangxi and Hunan province. According to most linguists the Dong speak a Kam-Sui language that is closely related to the Tai languages, and they call themselves Kam. The Dong

  • Donglin (Chinese history)

    Donglin, party of Chinese scholars and officials who attempted to combat the moral laxity and intellectual weakness they felt was undermining public life during the last years of the Ming dynasty (1368–1644). The party was founded by Gu Xiancheng, a government official forced out of office because

  • Donglin Dang (Chinese history)

    Donglin, party of Chinese scholars and officials who attempted to combat the moral laxity and intellectual weakness they felt was undermining public life during the last years of the Ming dynasty (1368–1644). The party was founded by Gu Xiancheng, a government official forced out of office because

  • Dongola (Sudan)

    Dongola, town, northern Sudan. It lies on the west bank of the Nile River, about 278 miles (448 km) northwest of Khartoum. The town is an agricultural centre for the surrounding area, which produces cotton, wheat, barley, sugarcane, and vegetables. Dongola is linked by road with Wādī ?alfā? and

  • Dongpo Academy of Classical Learning (academy, Danzhou, China)

    Hainan: Cultural life: The famous Dongpo Academy of Classical Learning (Dongpo Shuyuan)—located near the northwest-central city of Danzhou, first established in 1098, and where Su gave his lectures to his students—is now a tourist attraction. The so-called Temple of Five Lords (Wugongsi) near Haikuo, which commemorates five disgraced high-ranking central…

  • Dongpo Jushi (Chinese author)

    Su Shi, one of China’s greatest poets and essayists, who was also an accomplished calligrapher and a public official. A member of a literary family, the young Su Shi performed brilliantly in his official examinations and was rewarded with the first of the many official positions he occupied during

  • Dongpo Shuyuan (academy, Danzhou, China)

    Hainan: Cultural life: The famous Dongpo Academy of Classical Learning (Dongpo Shuyuan)—located near the northwest-central city of Danzhou, first established in 1098, and where Su gave his lectures to his students—is now a tourist attraction. The so-called Temple of Five Lords (Wugongsi) near Haikuo, which commemorates five disgraced high-ranking central…

  • Dongren (people)

    Dong, an ethnic minority of China found in southeastern Guizhou province and in neighbouring Zhuang Autonomous Region of Guangxi and Hunan province. According to most linguists the Dong speak a Kam-Sui language that is closely related to the Tai languages, and they call themselves Kam. The Dong

  • dongshuitian system (agricultural system, China)

    Sichuan: Agriculture and forestry: …the eastern basin is the dongshuitian (literally, “winter water-storage field”) system, in which large tracts of terraced fields are left fallow during the winter season and are used for the storage of water that is needed in the paddy fields in the spring; from the air they resemble a mosaic…

  • Dongting Hu (lake, China)

    Dongting Lake, large lake in northern Hunan province, south-central China. It lies in a basin to the south of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) and is connected to the Yangtze by four channels. Typically, some two-fifths of the river’s waters flow into the lake, the amount increasing during flood

  • Dongting Lake (lake, China)

    Dongting Lake, large lake in northern Hunan province, south-central China. It lies in a basin to the south of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) and is connected to the Yangtze by four channels. Typically, some two-fifths of the river’s waters flow into the lake, the amount increasing during flood

  • Dongxiang language

    Mongolian languages: …Monguor (Tu), Bao’an (Bonan), and Santa (Dongxiang) in the south—were isolated from the main body of Mongolian languages when the tide of Mongol conquest receded. These languages diverged from the main group of Mongolian dialects and to this day retain archaic features characteristic of Middle Mongolian that have been lost…

  • Dongxiwenhua ji qu zhexue (work by Liang Shuming)

    Liang Shuming: His influential Dongxiwenhua ji qu zhexue (1921; “The Cultures of East and West and Their Philosophies”) attempted to demonstrate to an increasingly iconoclastic and Westernized Chinese intelligentsia the modern relevance of Chinese, especially Confucian, culture. Characterizing the Western attitude as one of struggle, the Chinese attitude as…

  • Dongye (China)

    Fuzhou, city and capital of Fujian sheng (province), southeastern China. It is situated in the eastern part of the province on the north bank of the estuary of Fujian’s largest river, the Min River, a short distance from its mouth on the East China Sea. The Min gives the city access to the interior

  • Dongyuan (Chinese philosopher)

    Dai Zhen, Chinese empirical philosopher, considered by many to have been the greatest thinker of the Qing period (1644–1911/12). Born to poor parents, Dai educated himself by reading borrowed books. Although he passed his preliminary civil service examinations, he never passed the highly stylized

  • Dongyue (mountain, China)

    Mount Tai, mountain mass with several peaks along a southwest-northeast axis to the north of the city of Tai’an in Shandong province, eastern China. Mount Tai consists of a much-shattered fault block, mostly composed of archaic crystalline shales and granites and some ancient limestones. The

  • D?nhoff, Marion (German journalist)

    Marion D?nhoff, (Marion Hedda Ilse Gr?fin [Countess] D?nhoff), German journalist (born Dec. 2, 1909, Castle Friedrichstein, near K?nigsberg, East Prussia [now Kaliningrad, Russia]—died March 11, 2002, Berlin, Ger.), was known as the doyenne of German journalism for her nearly 60-year association w

  • D?nhoff, Marion Hedda Ilse Gr?fin (German journalist)

    Marion D?nhoff, (Marion Hedda Ilse Gr?fin [Countess] D?nhoff), German journalist (born Dec. 2, 1909, Castle Friedrichstein, near K?nigsberg, East Prussia [now Kaliningrad, Russia]—died March 11, 2002, Berlin, Ger.), was known as the doyenne of German journalism for her nearly 60-year association w

  • Doni Tondo (painting by Michelangelo)

    tondo: …for a painting of the Holy Family (Uffizi) commissioned by the Doni family.

  • Doni, Anton Francesco (Italian writer)

    short story: Spreading popularity: …unique in tales of ribaldry; Anton Francesco Doni included several tales of surprise and irony in his miscellany, I marmi (“The Marbles”); and Gianfrancesco Straparola experimented with common folktales and with dialects in his collection, Le piacevoli notti (“The Pleasant Nights”). In the early 17th century, Giambattista Basile attempted to…

  • Dōnin Hirata I (Japanese artist)

    enamelwork: Japan: When Dōnin Hirata I (1591–1646) made enamelled wares, having learned the technique from Koreans, his art was highly appreciated by Tokugawa Ieyasu, then the shogun of Japan, under whose patronage Hirata worked in Kyōto. There is a suit of armour with enamelled metal fittings ascribed to…

  • D?nitz, Karl (German naval commander)

    Karl D?nitz, German naval officer and creator of Germany’s World War II U-boat fleet who for a few days succeeded Adolf Hitler as German head of state. During World War I, D?nitz served as a submarine officer in the Black Sea and the Mediterranean. In the aftermath of Hitler’s accession to power,

  • Donizetti, Domenico Gaetano Maria (Italian opera composer)

    Gaetano Donizetti, Italian opera composer whose numerous operas in both Italian and French represent a transitional stage in operatic development between Rossini and Verdi. Among his major works are Lucia di Lammermoor (1835), La fille du régiment (1840), and La favorite (1840). In his serious

  • Donizetti, Gaetano (Italian opera composer)

    Gaetano Donizetti, Italian opera composer whose numerous operas in both Italian and French represent a transitional stage in operatic development between Rossini and Verdi. Among his major works are Lucia di Lammermoor (1835), La fille du régiment (1840), and La favorite (1840). In his serious

  • donjon (architecture)

    Keep, English term corresponding to the French donjon for the strongest portion of the fortification of a castle, the place of last resort in case of siege or attack. The keep was either a single tower or a larger fortified enclosure. Approximately round keeps, such as those in Berkeley Castle or

  • donkey (mammal)

    Donkey, (Equus asinus), domestic ass belonging to the horse family, Equidae, and descended from the African wild ass (Equus africanus; see ass). It is known to have been used as a beast of burden since 4000 bce. The average donkey stands 101.6 cm (40 inches) at the shoulder, but different breeds

  • Donkey Kong (electronic game)

    Donkey Kong, electronic game, originally released in 1981 by the Japanese Nintendo Company Ltd., that spawned a popular franchise and helped start the video game revolution of the 1980s. The arcade machine marked the first appearance of Donkey Kong, a rampaging ape who rolled barrels down a series

  • Donkey Kong Country (electronic game series)

    Donkey Kong: …sequels, including the critically acclaimed Donkey Kong Country series, and it inspired a cartoon television show and a documentary.

  • donkey orchid (plant)

    Donkey orchid, (genus Diuris), genus of about 60 species of terrestrial orchids (family Orchidaceae). One species is found in Java and Timor, and the others are native to Australia. The common donkey orchid (Diuris longifolia) bears three to five purplish flowers about 4 cm (1.5 inches) long. Other

  • Donkin, Bryan (British industrialist)

    Bryan Donkin, developer of a commercial application of the so-called Fourdrinier machine for making paper and inventor of the composition roller used in printing. While serving as an apprentice to a papermaker, John Hall, in Dartford, Kent, Donkin was engaged to perfect a papermaking machine that

  • Donleavy, J. P. (Irish-American author)

    J.P. Donleavy, American-born Irish author of the comic novel The Ginger Man (Paris, 1955; U.S., 1958), which introduced Dangerfield, a crass, comic antihero. Donleavy’s works are noted for their coarse sense of humour and for characters who remain deeply attached to life despite its flaws. Donleavy

  • Donleavy, James Patrick (Irish-American author)

    J.P. Donleavy, American-born Irish author of the comic novel The Ginger Man (Paris, 1955; U.S., 1958), which introduced Dangerfield, a crass, comic antihero. Donleavy’s works are noted for their coarse sense of humour and for characters who remain deeply attached to life despite its flaws. Donleavy

  • Donlevy, Brian (American actor)

    Stuart Heisler: Films of the 1940s: …fanciful Dalton Trumbo script, featured Brian Donlevy as the ghost of Andrew Jackson, back to aid a do-gooder (played by William Holden). Arguably better was The Glass Key (1942), a terse adaptation of the 1930 Dashiell Hammett novel, which had previously been filmed in 1935. Heisler’s version featured the pairing…

  • Donmar Warehouse Theatre (British theatrical company)

    Michael Grandage: …he became involved with London’s Donmar Warehouse, becoming an associate director in 2000 and succeeding Sam Mendes as artistic director in 2002.

  • D?nme (Jewish sect)

    D?nme, (Turkish: “Convert”), Jewish sect founded in Salonika (now Thessaloníki, Greece) in the late 17th century, after the conversion to Islām of Shabbetai Tzevi, whom the sectarians believed to be the Messiah. The D?nme, who numbered about 15,000 in the late 20th century, are found primarily in I

  • D?nmeh (Jewish sect)

    D?nme, (Turkish: “Convert”), Jewish sect founded in Salonika (now Thessaloníki, Greece) in the late 17th century, after the conversion to Islām of Shabbetai Tzevi, whom the sectarians believed to be the Messiah. The D?nme, who numbered about 15,000 in the late 20th century, are found primarily in I

  • Donn (Celtic deity)

    Celtic religion: Cosmology and eschatology: Donn, god of the dead and ancestor of all the Irish, reigned over Tech Duinn, which was imagined as on or under Bull Island off the Beare Peninsula, and to him all men returned except the happy few.

  • Donn Cuailnge (Celtic deity)

    Celtic religion: Zoomorphic deities: …is the divine bull, the Donn Cuailnge (“Brown Bull of Cooley”), which has a central role in the great Irish hero-tale Táin Bó Cuailnge (“The Cattle Raid of Cooley”) and which recalls the Tarvos Trigaranus (“The Bull of the Three Cranes”) pictured on reliefs from the cathedral at Trier, W.Ger.,…

  • Donn, Bertram (American astronomer)

    comet: Cometary nuclei: …first proposed by American astronomer Bertram Donn and British astronomer David Hughes in 1982, or “primordial rubble piles,” proposed by American astronomer Paul Weissman (the author of this article) in 1986, with low binding strength and high porosity. Key data supporting these models are estimates of nucleus bulk density, ranging…

  • Donna mi prega (poem by Cavalcanti)

    Guido Cavalcanti: …which the most famous is “Donna mi prega” (“A Lady Asks Me”), a beautiful and complex philosophical analysis of love, the subject of many later commentaries. Others are sonnets and ballate (ballads), the latter type usually considered his best. One of his best-known ballate was also one of his last,…

  • Donna Reed Show, The (American television series)

    Donna Reed: …in the long-running television sitcom The Donna Reed Show (1958–66); she was nominated four times (1959–62) for Emmy Awards and in 1963 won a Golden Globe Award for that role. Following the end of that series, she acted only sporadically. She starred in TV movies in 1979 and 1983, guest-starred…

  • Donnadieu, Marguerite (French author)

    Marguerite Duras, French novelist, screenwriter, scenarist, playwright, and film director, internationally known for her screenplays of Hiroshima mon amour (1959) and India Song (1975). The novel L’Amant (1984; The Lover; film, 1992) won the prestigious Prix Goncourt in 1984. Duras spent most of

  • Donnai River (river, Vietnam)

    Dong Nai River, river rising in the central highlands (Annamese Cordillera) of southern Vietnam, northwest of Da Lat. Near its source the river has rapids and is known as the Da Dung River. It flows west and southwest for about 300 miles (480 km), joining the Saigon River southwest of Bien Hoa. At

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    Frederick George Donnan: …have both become associated with Donnan’s name.

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    Frederick George Donnan, British chemist whose work was instrumental in the development of colloid chemistry. Donnan was educated at Queen’s College in Belfast, N.Ire., and at the Universities of Leipzig, Berlin, and London. From 1904 to 1913 he taught at the University of Liverpool, and from 1913

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