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  • Amenophis II (king of Egypt)

    Amenhotep II, king of ancient Egypt (reigned c. 1426–00 bce), son of Thutmose III. Ruling at the height of Egypt’s imperial era, he strove to maintain his father’s conquests by physical and military skills. Amenhotep II’s upbringing was carefully guided by his warrior father, with great emphasis on

  • Amenophis III (king of Egypt)

    Amenhotep III, king of ancient Egypt (reigned 1390–53 bce) in a period of peaceful prosperity, who devoted himself to expanding diplomatic contacts and to extensive building in Egypt and Nubia. In the fifth year of his reign, Amenhotep conducted campaigns against a territory called Akuyata in

  • Amenophis IV (king of Egypt)

    Akhenaten, king (1353–36 bce) of ancient Egypt of the 18th dynasty, who established a new cult dedicated to the Aton, the sun’s disk (hence his assumed name, Akhenaten, meaning “beneficial to Aton”). Few scholars now agree with the contention that Amenhotep III associated his son Amenhotep IV on

  • amenorrhea (physical disorder)

    Amenorrhea, failure to menstruate. Menstruation is the normal cyclic bleeding from the uterus in the female reproductive tract that occurs at approximately four-week intervals. Primary amenorrhea is the delay or failure to start menstruating upon reaching the age of 16, while secondary amenorrhea

  • amenorrhoea (physical disorder)

    Amenorrhea, failure to menstruate. Menstruation is the normal cyclic bleeding from the uterus in the female reproductive tract that occurs at approximately four-week intervals. Primary amenorrhea is the delay or failure to start menstruating upon reaching the age of 16, while secondary amenorrhea

  • Amenouzume (Japanese deity)

    Amenouzume, in Japanese mythology, the celestial goddess who performed a spontaneous dance enticing the sun goddess Amaterasu out of the cave in which she had secluded herself and had thus deprived the world of light. Amenouzume decorated herself with club moss and leaves of the sakaki tree, lit b

  • Amenouzume No Mikoto (Japanese deity)

    Amenouzume, in Japanese mythology, the celestial goddess who performed a spontaneous dance enticing the sun goddess Amaterasu out of the cave in which she had secluded herself and had thus deprived the world of light. Amenouzume decorated herself with club moss and leaves of the sakaki tree, lit b

  • amensalism (biology)

    Amensalism, association between organisms of two different species in which one is inhibited or destroyed and the other is unaffected. There are two basic modes: competition (q.v.), in which a larger or stronger organism excludes a smaller or weaker one from living space or deprives it of food,

  • ament (flower cluster)

    Catkin, Elongated cluster of single-sex flowers bearing scaly bracts and usually lacking petals. Many trees bear catkins, including willows, birches, and oaks. Wind carries pollen from male to female catkins or from male catkins to female flowers that take a different form (e.g., in

  • Ament, Jeff (American musician)

    Pearl Jam: …20, 1966, Seattle, Washington), bassist Jeff Ament (b. March 10, 1963, Havre, Montana), lead guitarist Mike McCready (b. April 5, 1966, Pensacola, Florida), and drummer Dave Krusen (b. March 10, 1966, Tacoma, Washington). Later members included Jack Irons (b. July 18, 1962, Los Angeles, California), Dave Abbruzzese (b. May 17,…

  • Amenta (Ceramese mythology)

    dema deity: …myth, a dema man named Amenta found a coconut speared on a boar’s tusk and in a dream was instructed to plant it. In six days a palm had sprung from the nut and flowered. Amenta cut his finger, and his blood dripped on the blossom. Nine days later a…

  • Amentaceae (plant family)

    Fagales: …in an artificial group called Amentiferae. The chief features of the members of Amentiferae were staminate flowers, and frequently also pistillate flowers, in catkins, reduced or absent sepals and petals, and a general trend toward wind pollination (anemophily). Fagales is now placed in the Rosid I group among the core…

  • Amentiferae (plant family)

    Fagales: …in an artificial group called Amentiferae. The chief features of the members of Amentiferae were staminate flowers, and frequently also pistillate flowers, in catkins, reduced or absent sepals and petals, and a general trend toward wind pollination (anemophily). Fagales is now placed in the Rosid I group among the core…

  • Amer (people)

    Tigre: …Tigre is that of the Amer (Beni Amer), a branch of the historically important Beja peoples. These Muslims all recognize the religious supremacy of the Mirghanīyah family of eastern Sudan. Another group, the Bet-Asgade (Bet Asgede), converted from Ethiopic Christianity to Islam. The life of the nomadic herdsman, so characteristic…

  • Amer (India)

    Amer, former town, east-central Rajasthan state, northwestern India. Amer is now part of the Jaipur urban agglomeration. It is noted for its Amer (or Amber) Palace (also called Amer Fort), which is part of several other Rajput fortresses that collectively were designated a UNESCO World Heritage

  • Amer Fort (fortress, Amer, India)

    Amer: It is noted for its Amer (or Amber) Palace (also called Amer Fort), which is part of several other Rajput fortresses that collectively were designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2013.

  • Amer Palace (fortress, Amer, India)

    Amer: It is noted for its Amer (or Amber) Palace (also called Amer Fort), which is part of several other Rajput fortresses that collectively were designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2013.

  • Amer, Ghada (Egyptian artist)

    African art: African art in the 20th century and beyond: …Klee—and the striking installations of Ghada Amer of Egypt, which employ textile arts to comment on issues related to female sexuality, underscore the range and multinational focus of contemporary art production.

  • Amerada Corporation (American company)

    Amerada Hess Corporation, integrated American petroleum company involved in exploration and development of oil and natural-gas resources, and the transportation, production, marketing, and sale of petroleum products. Headquarters are in New York City. The company was incorporated in 1920 as Amerada

  • Amerada Hess Corporation (American company)

    Amerada Hess Corporation, integrated American petroleum company involved in exploration and development of oil and natural-gas resources, and the transportation, production, marketing, and sale of petroleum products. Headquarters are in New York City. The company was incorporated in 1920 as Amerada

  • Amerada Petroleum Corporation (American company)

    Amerada Hess Corporation, integrated American petroleum company involved in exploration and development of oil and natural-gas resources, and the transportation, production, marketing, and sale of petroleum products. Headquarters are in New York City. The company was incorporated in 1920 as Amerada

  • Amerasia Basin (basin, Arctic Ocean)

    Arctic Ocean: Origin: The origin of the Amerasia Basin is far less clear. Most researchers favour a hypothesis of opening by rotation of the Arctic-Alaska lithospheric plate away from the North American Plate during the Cretaceous Period (about 145 to 65 million years ago). Better understanding of the origin of the Arctic…

  • amercement (English law)

    Amercement, in English law, an arbitrary financial penalty, formerly imposed on an offender by his peers or at the discretion of the court or the lord. Although the word has become practically synonymous with “fine,” there is a distinction in that fines are fixed by statute, whereas amercements

  • Ameretat (Zoroastrianism)

    amesha spenta: Haurvatāt (Wholeness or Perfection) and Ameretāt (Immortality) are often mentioned together as sisters. They preside over water and plants and may come to the believer as a reward for participation in the natures of the other amesha spentas.

  • América (work by Ixtolinque)

    Latin American art: Neoclassicism: His works include América (1830), a Neoclassical marble allegorical female figure, which he rendered with the same plumed Tupinambá headdress mentioned earlier but with European rather than Indian features. (Ultimately, the academy he headed had to close for lack of financial support from the state, which was then…

  • America (continents)

    Americas, the two continents, North and South America, of the Western Hemisphere. The climatic zones of the two continents are quite different. In North America, subarctic climate prevails in the north, gradually warming southward and finally becoming tropical near the southern isthmus. In South

  • America (yacht)

    America's Cup: …cup was won by the America, a 100-foot (30-metre) schooner from New York City, and subsequently became known as the America’s Cup. The American winners of the cup donated it to the New York Yacht Club in 1857 for a perpetual international challenge competition. In 1987 the San Diego Yacht…

  • America (television series)

    Alistair Cooke: …in his BBC-produced television series America (1972–73). In 13 installments, filmed on location throughout the United States, Cooke surveyed some 500 years of American history in an eclectic and personal but highly coherent narrative. Alistair Cooke’s America (1973), the book based on the award-winning program, was a best-seller in the…

  • America

    United States, country in North America, a federal republic of 50 states. Besides the 48 conterminous states that occupy the middle latitudes of the continent, the United States includes the state of Alaska, at the northwestern extreme of North America, and the island state of Hawaii, in the

  • America (sculpture by Cattelan)

    Maurizio Cattelan: Indeed, his America sculpture, a functioning solid-gold toilet, which was installed in a restroom at the Guggenheim from 2016 to 2017, drew long lines from good-humoured visitors and caused a social media frenzy. The artwork, estimated to be worth more than $4 million, was later stolen from…

  • America Again: Re-becoming the Greatness We Never Weren’t (work by Colbert)

    Stephen Colbert: …children’s book, was for adults—and America Again: Re-becoming the Greatness We Never Weren’t.

  • America and the World War (work by Roosevelt)

    Preparedness Movement: …two books on the subject, America and the World War (1915) and Fear God and Take Your Own Part (1916), that helped popularize the Preparedness Movement.

  • America at the Crossroads: Democracy, Power, and the Neoconservative Legacy (work by Fukuyama)

    Francis Fukuyama: In America at the Crossroads: Democracy, Power, and the Neoconservative Legacy (2006), he criticized neoconservatives and Republican Pres. George W. Bush and his administration’s policies after the September 11 attacks. In the 2008 presidential election he supported the Democratic candidate—and eventual winner—Barack Obama.

  • America First Committee (United States history)

    America First Committee, influential political pressure group in the United States (1940–41) that opposed aid to the Allies in World War II because it feared direct American military involvement in the conflict. The committee claimed a membership of 800,000 and attracted such leaders as General

  • América Móvil (Mexican company)

    Telmex SA: …in Telmex was acquired by América Móvil—Latin America’s leading mobile-phone company—which had been spun off from Telmex in 2001, although Slim retained ownership of it.

  • America NT & SA, Bank of

    Bank of America NT & SA, subsidiary of BankAmerica Corporation

  • America Online (American company)

    AOL, one of the largest Internet-access subscription service companies in the United States, providing a range of Web services for users. AOL was one of the first companies to establish a strong sense of community among its users through buddy lists and instant messaging services, which transmit

  • America Play, The (play by Parks)

    Suzan-Lori Parks: …Whole Entire World (produced 1990); The America Play (produced 1994), about a man obsessed with Abraham Lincoln; In the Blood (produced 1999), which updates Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter; and The Book of Grace (produced 2010), a biblically inflected examination of the familial relations of a racist patriarch. In 2006–07…

  • America the Beautiful (song by Bates)

    Katharine Lee Bates: …text of the national hymn “America the Beautiful.”

  • America We Deserve, The (work by Trump)

    Donald Trump: Politics: …published a book that year, The America We Deserve, in which he set forth his socially liberal and economically conservative political views. Trump later rejoined the Republican Party, and he maintained a high public profile during the 2012 presidential election. Although he did not run for office at that time,…

  • America’s Army (electronic game)

    America’s Army, army training simulator and electronic game used for army recruitment and training. It was created in 2002 by Lieut. Col. Casey Wardynski of the U.S. Army. The game is maintained and managed by the U.S. Army and received positive reviews for its realistic depiction of a soldier’s

  • America’s Best Comics (American comic book imprint)

    America’s Best Comics (ABC), American comic book imprint launched in 1999 by comic creator Alan Moore. An imprint of WildStorm, an independent publisher founded by artist Jim Lee, America’s Best Comics (ABC) was intended to provide Moore with a creative avenue that was separate from mainstream

  • America’s Blue Yodeler (American singer)

    Jimmie Rodgers, American singer, songwriter, and guitarist, one of the principal figures in the emergence of the country and western style of popular music. Rodgers, whose mother died when he was a young boy, was the son of an itinerant railroad gang foreman, and his youth was spent in a variety of

  • America’s Coming of Age (work by Brooks)

    Van Wyck Brooks: …in his first major work, America’s Coming-of-Age (1915), which made a strong impact with its thesis that the Puritan duality that separated spiritual and money matters had resulted in a corresponding split in contemporary American culture between “highbrow” and “lowbrow” publics, neither of which was helpful to the writer.

  • America’s Cup (yacht race and trophy)

    America’s Cup, one of the oldest and best-known trophies in international sailing yacht competition. It was first offered as the Hundred Guinea Cup on August 20, 1851, by the Royal Yacht Squadron of Great Britain for a race around the Isle of Wight. The cup was won by the America, a 100-foot

  • America’s Economic Supremacy (work by Adams)

    Brooks Adams: His America’s Economic Supremacy (1900) accurately foresaw that within 50 years there would be in the world only two powers, Russia and the United States, the latter possessing economic supremacy. In 1913 he published The Theory of Social Revolutions, a study of defects in the American…

  • America’s Funniest Home Videos (American television program)

    Television in the United States: Reality TV: ABC introduced America’s Funniest Home Videos (ABC, begun 1990), featuring tapes sent in by home viewers hoping to win prize money. When that show immediately reached the Nielsen top 10, it was followed by America’s Funniest People (ABC, 1990–94), a sort of updated version of Real People…

  • America’s Funniest People (American television show)

    Television in the United States: Reality TV: …10, it was followed by America’s Funniest People (ABC, 1990–94), a sort of updated version of Real People that mixed professional and amateur video productions.

  • America’s Got Talent (American television show)

    Tyra Banks: Television shows: …hosting the reality TV series America’s Got Talent.

  • America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response Alert (safety warning)

    texting: …Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response (AMBER) Alert warnings of child abductions in the United States began to be sent by text to those who chose to receive them, and, as of 2018, 924 children had been recovered.

  • America’s Most Wanted (American television program)

    Television in the United States: Reality TV: America’s Most Wanted (Fox/Lifetime, 1988–2012) and Unsolved Mysteries (NBC/CBS, 1988–99; Lifetime, 2001–02) used actors to dramatize stories about crimes for which the suspects were still at large. Traditional journalists decried the use of these reenactments, but hundreds of criminals were apprehended as a result of…

  • America’s National Game (book by Spalding)

    baseball: Baseball and the arts: Spalding’s America’s National Game (1911), generally regarded as the first attempts at writing a standard history of baseball, cite “Casey at the Bat” as the best baseball poem ever written. Spalding goes so far as to proclaim that “Love has its sonnets galore; War its epics…

  • America’s Next Top Model (television show)

    Tyra Banks: Television shows: …host and executive producer of America’s Next Top Model, a weekly prime-time reality talent show that chronicled the search for a promising fashion model from a lineup of neophytes. It swiftly became one of the highest-rated shows in the history of the UPN (United Paramount Network). The show later aired…

  • America, A Prophecy (work by Blake)

    Urizen: …the so-called “Prophetic Books,” including America, a Prophecy (1793), The Book of Urizen (1794), and The Song of Los (1795), and then, more ambitiously, in the unfinished manuscript Vala, or The Four Zoas, written from approximately 1796 to 1807. In an engraving from Europe, a Prophecy (1794), Blake depicts Urizen…

  • America, America (film by Kazan [1963])

    Elia Kazan: Films, stage work, and writing of the 1960s and ’70s: America, America (1963) was an intensely personal project based on the experiences of Kazan’s immigrant uncle. A film of undeniable power, it earned Kazan his final Academy Award nomination for best director. Kazan followed it by directing Miller’s After the Fall (1964) on the stage…

  • America, Bank of (American bank)

    A.P. Giannini: …California-based Bank of Italy—later the Bank of America—which, by the 1930s, was the world’s largest commercial bank. He was a major pioneer of branch banking.

  • America, Their America (work by Clark)

    John Pepper Clark: …foundation grant resulted in his America, Their America (1964), in which he attacks American middle-class values, from capitalism to black American life-styles. After a year’s research at Ibadan’s Institute of African Studies, he became a lecturer in English at the University of Lagos and coeditor of the literary journal Black…

  • America, Volunteers of (American religious organization)

    Volunteers of America, religious social-welfare organization in the United States that offers spiritual and material aid to those in need. It was founded in New York City in 1896 by Ballington and Maud Booth as a result of a schism in the Salvation Army and is organized along quasi-military lines.

  • America: Farm to Table (cookbook by Batali)

    Mario Batali: …My Home to Yours (2011), America: Farm to Table (2014; cowritten with Jim Webster), and Big American Cookbook: 250 Favorite Recipes from Across the USA (2016). He was also profiled in Bill Buford’s Heat (2006), which follows Buford as he tries his hand as an amateur chef in Babbo’s kitchen.

  • Américains, Les (work by Frank)

    United States: The visual arts and postmodernism: Frank’s book The Americans (l956), the record of a tour of the United States that combined the sense of accident of a family slide show with a sense of the ominous worthy of the Italian painter Giorgio de Chirico, was the masterpiece of this vision; and no…

  • American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (American organization)

    American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP), professional organization founded in 1985 that seeks to educate the public and influence public policy with regard to addictive illness while increasing the overall effectiveness of psychiatric care in the United States related to addictions.

  • American Academy of Arts and Sciences (honorary society)

    American Academy of Arts and Sciences, honorary society incorporated on May 4, 1780, in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., for the purpose of cultivating “every art and science.” Its membership—more than 4,500 fellows in the United States and about 600 foreign honorary fellows (all scholars and national

  • American Academy of Pediatrics (American organization)

    circumcision: …credence in 1971 when the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) found that there was “no absolute medical indication for routine circumcision.” In 2012, following an extensive review of scientific research, the AAP issued an updated policy statement, in which it concluded that circumcision does in fact offer certain health advantages…

  • American Action Painters, The (essay by Rosenberg)

    Harold Rosenberg: …published his influential essay “The American Action Painters” in Art News, a publication that would later become identified with both his views on art and his poetic literary style. In that essay he championed the idea of the artist’s canvas as “an arena in which to act,” strategically distancing…

  • American Airlines (American company)

    American Airlines, major American airline serving nearly 50 countries across the globe and a founding member of the oneworld global alliance. Its parent, or holding, company, AMR Corp. (created in 1982), also has holdings in food-catering services, hotels and inns, airport ground-transportation and

  • American Airlines flight 77 (terrorist hijacking, Arlington, Virginia, United States [2001])

    American Airlines flight 77, flight scheduled to travel from Dulles International Airport near Washington, D.C., to Los Angeles International Airport on September 11, 2001, that was hijacked by terrorists and deliberately crashed into the Pentagon as part of the September 11 attacks. The American

  • American alligator (reptile)

    alligator: The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), the larger of the two species, is found in the southeastern United States. It is black with yellow banding when young and is generally brownish when adult. The maximum length is about 5.8 metres (19 feet), but it more typically ranges…

  • American Amateur Baseball Congress (sports organization)

    baseball: Amateur baseball: The American Amateur Baseball Congress (founded 1935) conducts programs for youths age 8 to 19 and adults in seven divisions. By the late 1990s Little League (founded 1939), originally for boys 8 to 12 years old, had about 2,500,000 players in its baseball program and 400,000…

  • American Anarchist (film by Siskel [2016])

    William Powell: …documentary film by Charlie Siskel, American Anarchist.

  • American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society (United States history)

    Arthur Tappan: …created a new organization, the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society. He advocated trying to achieve abolition through the political process and backed the Liberty Party in the 1840s. With the passage of the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850, however, both of the Tappan brothers became more radical. Arthur Tappan openly…

  • American antelope (mammal)

    Pronghorn, (Antilocapra americana), North American hoofed mammal, the sole living member of the old ruminant family Antilocapridae (order Artiodactyla). It is the only animal that has branching horns and sheds them annually. This graceful denizen of open plains and semideserts is reddish brown and

  • American Anthropological Association (American organization)

    Elsie Clews Parsons: …be elected president of the American Anthropological Association, but she did not live to deliver her inaugural address, which dealt with the abuse of anthropology to further racist schemes.

  • American Anti-Slavery Society (United States history)

    American Anti-Slavery Society, (1833–70), promoter, with its state and local auxiliaries, of the cause of immediate abolition of slavery in the United States. As the main activist arm of the Abolition Movement (see abolitionism), the society was founded in 1833 under the leadership of William Lloyd

  • American Appliance Company (American company)

    Raytheon Company, major American industrial corporation with core manufacturing concentrations in defense and aerospace electronics. Established in 1922, the company reincorporated in 1928 and adopted its present name in 1959. Its electronics and defense-systems units produce air-, sea-, and

  • American arborvitae (plant)

    American arborvitae, (Thuja occidentalis), ornamental and timber evergreen conifer of the cypress family (Cupressaceae), native to eastern North America. In the lumber trade it is called, among other names, white cedar, eastern white cedar, and New Brunswick cedar. Often 20 m (65 feet) tall, the

  • American Arithmometer Company (American company)

    William Seward Burroughs: Louis businessmen, he organized the American Arithmometer Company in 1886; after much trial and error he patented a practical model in 1892. (See the photograph.) Although the machine was a commercial success, he died before receiving much money from it. A year before his death he received the John Scott…

  • American Art Association (American auction house)

    art market: The growth of the auction market: … in the United States, the American Art Association, opened in 1883, but auctioneering business was slow to develop there.

  • American Assassin (film by Cuesta [2017])

    Michael Keaton: …a young CIA recruit in American Assassin (2017), which was based on the best-selling novel of the same name. He later was cast as the owner of an amusement park in Dumbo (2019), Tim Burton’s live-action remake of the 1941 Disney classic.

  • American Association (sports organization)

    baseball: League formation: In 1881 the American Association was formed with teams from cities that were not members of the National League and teams that had been expelled from the league (such as Cincinnati, which was disciplined in 1880 for playing games on Sunday and allowing liquor on the grounds). In…

  • American Association for Public Opinion Research (American interest group)

    public opinion: Nonscientific polling: Interest groups such as the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR), the European Society for Opinion Marketing and Research, and the World Association for Public Opinion Research serve a watchdog role regarding opinion polling. To assist reporters as well as the general public in their understanding of poll results,…

  • American Association for the Advancement of Science (American science organization)

    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the largest general scientific society in the United States. It was founded in 1847 in Boston, Mass., by a number of geologists and naturalists and held its first meeting in Philadelphia, Pa., in 1848. Its goals are to further the work of

  • American Association of Political Consultants (American organization)

    American Association of Political Consultants (AAPC), professional organization founded in 1969 for political consultants, lobbyists, media producers, fund-raisers, and campaign workers at all levels of government. The American Association of Political Consultants (AAPC) is a multi-partisan

  • American Association of Retired Persons (American organization)

    American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that works to address the needs and interests of middle-aged and elderly people in the United States. Its membership is open to all persons age 50 or older, whether working or retired. It is headquartered in

  • American Association of University Professors (American organization)

    American Association of University Professors (AAUP), organization of faculty and researchers employed at American colleges and universities, established in 1915. Among its primary goals are to promote and protect academic freedom and shared governance in institutions of higher learning, to ensure

  • American Association of University Women (American organization)

    American Association of University Women (AAUW), American organization founded in 1881 and dedicated to promoting “education and equity for all women and girls.” The AAUW was founded in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1881 by 17 college women. At the time, many barriers hindered women from pursuing

  • American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (American organization)

    Isaac Newton Kerlin: …Persons (now known as the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities). Kerlin would serve as the secretary-treasurer of that organization for the next 16 years, publishing and disseminating the proceedings of the group’s annual meetings. After the deaths of Samuel Gridley Howe in 1876 and Séguin in 1880, Kerlin…

  • American Astronomical Society (American organization)

    Margaret Burbidge: Cannon Prize from the American Astronomical Society (AAS) because, as it was an award for women only, it represented for her another facet of the same discrimination. Her action led to the formation of a standing AAS committee for the status of women in astronomy. Burbidge later became a…

  • American Asylum for Deaf-mutes (school, Hartford, Connecticut, United States)

    Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet: …and Laurent Clerc established the American Asylum for Deaf-mutes at Hartford, Conn., in support of which the U.S. Congress made a land grant. For more than 50 years this school was the main training centre for instructors of the deaf.

  • American Athletic Conference (American athletic organization)

    American Athletic Conference, American collegiate athletic organization that was founded in 2013. The conference consists of the Universities of Central Florida, Cincinnati, Connecticut, Houston, Memphis, South Florida, and Tulsa as well as East Carolina, Southern Methodist, Temple, Tulane, and

  • American Automobile Association

    automobile club: The American Automobile Association (AAA) was established in 1902, consolidating nine earlier auto clubs. By the last quarter of the century there were more than 100 national auto clubs and associations affiliated throughout the world, linked by reciprocal agreements.

  • American avocet (bird)

    avocet: The slightly larger American avocet (R. americana), which is about 45 cm (18 inches) long (including the bill), differs chiefly in having the head and neck pinkish brown in breeding season, white in winter. It nests in western North America and winters from California and Texas to Guatemala.…

  • American badger (mammal)

    badger: The American badger, the only New World species, is usually found in open, dry country of western North America. Muscular, short-necked, and flat-bodied, it has a broad, flattened head and short legs and tail. The colour of the coat is grayish and grizzled, dark at the…

  • American bald eagle (bird)

    Bald eagle, (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), the only eagle solely native to North America, and the national bird of the United States. The bald eagle is actually a sea eagle (Haliaeetus species) that commonly occurs inland along rivers and large lakes. The adult male is about 90 cm (36 inches) long and

  • American Ballads (work by Gould)

    American Ballads, six-movement orchestral piece on patriotic themes by American composer Morton Gould that premiered on April 24, 1976, during the U.S. Bicentennial. The piece was funded by the New York State Council on the Arts and first performed by the Queens Symphony, with Gould conducting.

  • American Ballads: Settings of American Tunes for Orchestra (work by Gould)

    American Ballads, six-movement orchestral piece on patriotic themes by American composer Morton Gould that premiered on April 24, 1976, during the U.S. Bicentennial. The piece was funded by the New York State Council on the Arts and first performed by the Queens Symphony, with Gould conducting.

  • American Ballet (American ballet company)

    American Ballet, company founded in conjunction with the School of American Ballet in 1934 by Lincoln Kirstein and Edward Warburg, with George Balanchine as artistic director. Its initial performances were held in 1934 in Hartford, Conn., U.S. In 1935 it became the resident ballet company for the

  • American Ballet Caravan (American ballet company)

    American Ballet, company founded in conjunction with the School of American Ballet in 1934 by Lincoln Kirstein and Edward Warburg, with George Balanchine as artistic director. Its initial performances were held in 1934 in Hartford, Conn., U.S. In 1935 it became the resident ballet company for the

  • American Ballet Theatre (American ballet company)

    American Ballet Theatre, ballet company based in New York City and having an affiliated school. It was founded in 1939 by Lucia Chase and Richard Pleasant and presented its first performance on January 11, 1940. Chase was director, with Oliver Smith, from 1945 to 1980. The dancer Mikhail

  • American Ballet, School of (American school of dance)

    American Ballet: …founded in conjunction with the School of American Ballet in 1934 by Lincoln Kirstein and Edward Warburg, with George Balanchine as artistic director. Its initial performances were held in 1934 in Hartford, Conn., U.S. In 1935 it became the resident ballet company for the Metropolitan Opera in New York City,…

  • American Bandstand

    From 1957 through 1963 Philadelphia was the “Home of the Hits,” a reflection of the power of Dick Clark’s American Bandstand television show, carried nationally on the American Broadcasting Company network. The program’s format was simple: singers mimed to their records, and the show’s teenage

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