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  • Allegany (county, New York, United States)

    Allegany, county, southwestern New York state, U.S., bordered to the south by Pennsylvania and comprising a region of moderate relief. The principal waterways are the Genesee River and Rushford and Cuba lakes. Public lands include the Oil Spring Indian Reservation and state wildlife management

  • Allegany (county, Maryland, United States)

    Allegany, county, western Maryland, U.S. It consists of an irregular neck of land between Pennsylvania to the north and West Virginia to the south (the North Branch Potomac River constituting the border with West Virginia). The county rests on part of the Allegheny Plateau and includes Rocky Gap

  • Alleghenian orogeny (geology)

    Alleghenian orogeny, mountain-building event, occurring almost entirely within the Permian Period (299 million to 251 million years ago), that created the Appalachian Mountains. The Alleghenian orogeny resulted from the collision of the central and southern Appalachian continental margin of North

  • Alleghenies (plateau, United States)

    Allegheny Plateau, western section of the Appalachian Mountains, U.S., extending southwestward from the Mohawk River valley in central New York to the Cumberland Plateau in southern West Virginia. Generally sloping toward the northwest, the plateau has been dissected by streams to form the

  • Alleghenies (American baseball team)

    Pittsburgh Pirates, American professional baseball team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Sometimes referred to as the “Bucs,” the Pirates are among the oldest teams in baseball and have won the World Series five times (1909, 1925, 1960, 1971, and 1979). The team that would become the Pirates was

  • Alleghenies (mountains, United States)

    Allegheny Mountains, mountainous eastern part of the Allegheny Plateau in the Appalachian Mountains, U.S. The Allegheny range extends south-southwestward for more than 500 miles (800 km) from north-central Pennsylvania to southwestern Virginia. Rising to Mount Davis (3,213 feet [979 m]; highest

  • Allegheny (county, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Allegheny, county, southwestern Pennsylvania, U.S., consisting of a hilly region on the Allegheny Plateau bounded to the southeast by the Monongahela and Youghiogheny rivers and to the northeast by the Allegheny River. The Ohio, Allegheny, and Monongahela rivers converge in the centre of the county

  • Allegheny Airlines, Inc. (American company)

    US Airways, former American airline that was incorporated on March 5, 1937, as All American Aviation, Inc. It underwent numerous name changes before becoming US Airways in 1997. In 2015, two years after announcing plans to merge with American Airlines, the carrier flew its last flight. The company

  • Allegheny barberry (plant)

    barberry: The American or Allegheny barberry (B. canadensis) is native to eastern North America. Japanese barberry (B. thunbergii) often is cultivated as a hedge or ornamental shrub for its scarlet fall foliage and bright-red, long-lasting berries. Several varieties with purple or yellow foliage, spinelessness, or dwarf habit…

  • Allegheny chinquapin (plant)
  • Allegheny College (college, Meadville, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Allegheny College, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Meadville, Pennsylvania, U.S. The college offers bachelor’s degrees in the liberal arts and sciences. It also sponsors study-abroad programs in various countries. The college, though affiliated with the United Methodist

  • Allegheny County Court House and Jail (building, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States)

    H.H. Richardson: …at Harvard University, at the Allegheny County Courthouse and Jail (1884–87) in Pittsburgh, at the Glessner House in Chicago (1885–87), or in the series of libraries in the small towns around Boston, from Woburn and North Easton to Quincy and Malden. The Crane Memorial Library in Quincy, Massachusetts (1880–82), with…

  • Allegheny Front (geological feature, West Virginia, United States)

    West Virginia: Relief: …these are separated by the Allegheny Front, dividing the waters that flow to the Atlantic Ocean from those flowing to the Gulf of Mexico. The Appalachian Plateau Province covers the western two-thirds of the state and coincides with the Ohio River drainage basin. It is a region severely dissected by…

  • Allegheny Mountains (mountains, United States)

    Allegheny Mountains, mountainous eastern part of the Allegheny Plateau in the Appalachian Mountains, U.S. The Allegheny range extends south-southwestward for more than 500 miles (800 km) from north-central Pennsylvania to southwestern Virginia. Rising to Mount Davis (3,213 feet [979 m]; highest

  • Allegheny Plateau (plateau, United States)

    Allegheny Plateau, western section of the Appalachian Mountains, U.S., extending southwestward from the Mohawk River valley in central New York to the Cumberland Plateau in southern West Virginia. Generally sloping toward the northwest, the plateau has been dissected by streams to form the

  • Allegheny Portage Railroad (railway, United States)

    tunnels and underground excavations: Canal and railroad tunnels: …a 701-foot construction on the Allegheny Portage Railroad. Built in 1831–33, it was a combination of canal and railroad systems, carrying canal barges over a summit. Though plans for a transport link from Boston to the Hudson River had first called for a canal tunnel to pass under the Berkshire…

  • Allegheny River (river, United States)

    Allegheny River, river rising in the hilly plateau region of Potter county, Pennsylvania, U.S., and flowing generally northward for about 80 miles (130 km). The river enters New York state where the Allegheny Reservoir is impounded at Allegany State Park. Turning southwest, it continues for 120

  • Allegheny serviceberry (plant)

    serviceberry: Common species: …metres (26 feet); and the Allegheny serviceberry (A. laevis), which is similar to A. canadensis but is taller and has more nodding flower clusters. The downy serviceberry (A. arborea) is also similar to A. canadensis but is more vigorous and has larger hanging flower clusters. The apple serviceberry (Amelanchier ×grandiflora),…

  • Allegheny vine (plant)

    fumitory: The related climbing fumitory (Adlumia fungosa), also known as Allegheny vine or mountain fringe, is a sprawling herbaceous biennial that coils its long leafstalks around supports. It reaches 3.5 metres (11.5 feet) in height and has clusters of white or pinkish tubular flowers borne among delicately cut…

  • Allegheny woodrat (rodent)

    woodrat: … construction is that of the Allegheny woodrat (N. magister). Although it is merely a cup made of plants, the rat protects it with a small pile of sticks among boulders on a cliff ledge or inside a cave. The most elaborate configuration is the huge stick nest of the dusky-footed…

  • Allegiant (novel by Roth)

    Veronica Roth: …base grew quickly, and when Allegiant came out in 2013, it became the most-preordered book ever issued by HarperCollins. The trilogy was a huge commercial success, with more than 30 million copies sold by 2015.

  • Allegoria e derisione (work by Pratolini)

    Vasco Pratolini: The final volume, Allegoria e derisione (1966; “Allegory and Derision”), deals with the triumph and fall of Fascism, focusing on the moral and intellectual conflicts of the Florentine intelligentsia.

  • allegorical interpretation (biblical criticism)

    biblical literature: Allegorical interpretation: Allegorical interpretation places on biblical literature a meaning that, with rare exceptions, it was never intended to convey. Yet at times this interpretation seemed imperative. If the literal sense, on which heretics such as the 2nd-century biblical critic Marcion and anti-Christian polemicists such…

  • allegorical portraiture (art)

    Jean-Marc Nattier: …revived the genre of the allegorical portrait, in which a living person is depicted as a Greco-Roman goddess or other mythological figure. Nattier’s graceful and charming portraits of court ladies in this mode were very fashionable, partly because he could beautify a sitter while also retaining her likeness. He served…

  • Allegories (work by Lorenzetti)

    Ambrogio Lorenzetti: …are most evident in the Allegories in the Palazzo Pubblico, the most important Sienese fresco decoration. In it Ambrogio is seen as an acute observer, an empirical explorer of linear and aerial perspective, a student of Classical works of art, and a political and moral philosopher. His desire to depict…

  • allegory (art and literature)

    Allegory, a symbolic fictional narrative that conveys a meaning not explicitly set forth in the narrative. Allegory, which encompasses such forms as fable, parable, and apologue, may have meaning on two or more levels that the reader can understand only through an interpretive process. (See also

  • Allegory and Derision (work by Pratolini)

    Vasco Pratolini: The final volume, Allegoria e derisione (1966; “Allegory and Derision”), deals with the triumph and fall of Fascism, focusing on the moral and intellectual conflicts of the Florentine intelligentsia.

  • Allegory of Divine Providence and Barberini Power (painting by Pietro)

    Western painting: Early and High Baroque in Italy: …a prelude to the gigantic “Allegory of Divine Providence and Barberini Power,” which Pietro was to paint on the vault of the Great Hall of the Palazzo Barberini, Rome (1633–39). Pietro continued with this style of monumental painting for the remainder of his career, and it became the model for…

  • Allegory of Divine Wisdom (painting by Sacchi)

    Andrea Sacchi: Sacchi’s ceiling fresco, Allegory of Divine Wisdom (1629–33), is a grave static work, markedly Raphaelesque in conception and containing relatively few figures, in contrast to Pietro’s full Baroque Triumph of Divine Providence in an adjoining room. Sacchi’s two altarpieces in Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini, Rome (1631–38),…

  • Allegory of Fertility (painting by Jordaens)

    Jacob Jordaens: …tapestries, and such paintings as Allegory of Fertility (c. 1625) reveal his training as a decorator. He never went to Italy as did other Flemish artists of his time, and his work is essentially Flemish in its exaggerated treatment of form and its crude humour. Jordaens was greatly influenced by…

  • Allegory of Inclination (painting by Gentileschi)

    Artemisia Gentileschi: …Medici court and painted an Allegory of Inclination (c. 1616) for the series of frescoes honouring the life of Michelangelo in the Casa Buonarotti. Her colours are more brilliant than her father’s, and she continued to employ the tenebrism made popular by Caravaggio long after her father had abandoned that…

  • Allegory of Love: A Study in Medieval Tradition, The (work by Lewis)

    courtly love: Lewis’s The Allegory of Love (1936), became more pronounced in later romances.

  • Allegory of Prudence, An (work by Titian)

    Titian: Portraits: …the Triple Portrait Mask, or An Allegory of Prudence, in which Titian, gray-bearded and wearing a rose-coloured cap, represents old age, his son Orazio represents maturity, and presumably Marco Vecellio stands for youth.

  • Allegory of Spring (painting by Botticelli)

    Sandro Botticelli: Mythological paintings: …of Botticelli’s most famous works: Primavera (c. 1477–82), Pallas and the Centaur (c. 1485), Venus and Mars (c. 1485), and The Birth of Venus (c. 1485). The Primavera, or Allegory of Spring, and The Birth of Venus were painted for the home of Lorenzo di Pierfrancesco de’ Medici. All four…

  • allegory of the cave (Platonic philosophy)

    Western philosophy: Philosophy: In the famous myth of the cave in the seventh book of the Republic, Plato likened the ordinary person to a man sitting in a cave looking at a wall on which he sees nothing but the shadows of real things behind his back, and he likened the…

  • Allegory of the Missionary Work of the Jesuits (painting by Pozzo)

    Western painting: Early and High Baroque in Italy: After this, the “Allegory of the Missionary Work of the Jesuits,” painted by Andrea Pozzo on the nave vault of San Ignazio, Rome (1691–94), seems almost an anticlimax, despite its gigantic size and hypertrophic illusionism. Concurrently, the Baroque-versus-classicism controversy took on a new lease on life, with Gaulli…

  • Allegory of the Reign of Rudolf II (painting by Spranger)

    Western painting: Bohemia: Spranger’s “Allegory of Rudolf II” indicates the quality of Rudolf’s court art and its clear Mannerist sympathies—sensually graceful figures clad in the dress of classical antiquity and a cultivated facility in composition and execution.

  • Allegresse (sculpture by Vonnoh)

    Bessie Potter Vonnoh: …for sculpture for her work Allegresse (1921). She was the recipient of several other prizes throughout her career, including a bronze medal in 1900 for one of her sculptures at the Paris exposition and a gold medal in 1904 for her sculpture at the St. Louis exposition, and she was…

  • Allégret, Marc (French director)

    Marc Allégret, French motion-picture director known for his exacting film technique. Allégret was educated in law in Paris, but while accompanying his uncle André Gide on a trip to Africa, he recorded the trip on film. He served as an assistant director to Robert Florey and Augusto Genina and in

  • Allégret, Yves (French director)

    Yves Allégret, French motion-picture director who gained fame for his work in the “film noir” genre that was popular in the late 1940s. Allégret began his film career working as an assistant to his older brother, the director Marc Allégret, and for Augusto Genina and Jean Renoir. Entering films

  • Allégret, Yves Edouard (French director)

    Yves Allégret, French motion-picture director who gained fame for his work in the “film noir” genre that was popular in the late 1940s. Allégret began his film career working as an assistant to his older brother, the director Marc Allégret, and for Augusto Genina and Jean Renoir. Entering films

  • Allegri, Antonio (Italian artist)

    Correggio, most important Renaissance painter of the school of Parma, whose late works influenced the style of many Baroque and Rococo artists. His first important works are the convent ceiling of San Paolo (c. 1519), Parma, depicting allegories on humanist themes, and the frescoes in San Giovanni

  • Allegria di naufragi (work by Ungaretti)

    Giuseppe Ungaretti: …direction, as is apparent in Allegria di naufragi (1919; “Gay Shipwrecks”), which shows the influence of Giacomo Leopardi and includes revised poems from Ungaretti’s first volume.

  • Allegro spiritoso (Rondo alla campanella) (work by Paganini)

    La campanella, (Italian: “The Little Bell”) final movement of the Violin Concerto No. 2 in B Minor, Op. 7, by Italian composer and violinist Niccolò Paganini, renowned for its intricate and technically demanding solo passages and for the bell-like effects featured in both the solo and orchestral

  • Allegro, L’? (poem by Milton)

    L’Allegro, early lyric poem by John Milton, written in 1631 and published in his Poems (1645). It was written in rhymed octosyllabics. A contrasting companion piece to his “Il Penseroso,” “L’Allegro” invokes the goddess Mirth, with whom the poet wants to live, first in pastoral simplicity and then

  • allele (biology)

    Allele, any one of two or more genes that may occur alternatively at a given site (locus) on a chromosome. Alleles may occur in pairs, or there may be multiple alleles affecting the expression (phenotype) of a particular trait. The combination of alleles that an organism carries constitutes its

  • allele frequency (genetics)

    heredity: Population genetics: In population genetics, allele frequency is the measurement of the commonness of an allele. The convention is to let the frequency of a dominant allele be p and that of a recessive allele q. Both are generally expressed as decimal fractions. In the above example, p changes from…

  • allelengyon (Byzantine tax)

    Byzantine Empire: Social and economic change: …outstanding taxes known as the allelengyon now devolved not on the rest of the village community but on the nearest large landowner, whether lay or ecclesiastical. Basil’s conquest of Bulgaria somewhat altered the social and economic pattern of the empire, for new themes were created there in which there was…

  • allelic heterogeneity (genetics)

    human genetic disease: Autosomal dominant inheritance: …in the affected population (allelic heterogeneity). In some cases even mutations in different genes can lead to the same clinical disorder (genetic heterogeneity). Achondroplasia is characterized by allelic homogeneity, such that essentially all affected individuals carry exactly the same mutation.

  • allelic homogeneity (genetics)

    human genetic disease: Autosomal dominant inheritance: …the same molecular defect (allelic homogeneity), or they may be heterogeneous, such that tens or even hundreds of different mutations, all affecting the same gene, may be seen in the affected population (allelic heterogeneity). In some cases even mutations in different genes can lead to the same clinical disorder…

  • allelochemical (chemistry)

    community ecology: Specialization in grazing: These compounds, called allelochemicals, are found in almost all plant species, and their great diversity suggests that chemical defense against herbivores and pathogens has always been an important part of plant evolution.

  • allelomorph (biology)

    Allele, any one of two or more genes that may occur alternatively at a given site (locus) on a chromosome. Alleles may occur in pairs, or there may be multiple alleles affecting the expression (phenotype) of a particular trait. The combination of alleles that an organism carries constitutes its

  • Alleluia (work by Thompson)

    Alleluia, a short a cappella choral work by the American composer Randall Thompson that premiered on July 8, 1940, at the Berkshire Music Center (now the Tanglewood Music Center), the summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO), near Lenox, Massachusetts. It has opened Tanglewood’s summer

  • alleluia (religious music)

    Hallelujah, Hebrew liturgical expression meaning “praise ye Yah” (“praise the Lord”). It appears in the Hebrew Bible in several psalms, usually at the beginning or end of the psalm or in both places. In ancient Judaism it was probably chanted as an antiphon by the Levite choir. In the New Testament

  • Alleluia Nativitas (music by Pérotin)

    counterpoint: Counterpoint in the Middle Ages: In his three-part Alleluia Nativitas, the voices are in different rhythmic modes, and they are also distinguished by different phrase lengths, consisting of more or fewer repetitions of the rhythmic pattern.

  • Allelujah! (play by Bennett)

    Alan Bennett: …of an embattled Yorkshire hospital, Allelujah! (2018) was viewed as a critique on Britain’s National Health Service.

  • allemande (dance and music)

    Allemande, processional couple dance with stately, flowing steps, fashionable in 16th-century aristocratic circles; also an 18th-century figure dance. The earlier dance apparently originated in Germany but became fashionable both at the French court (whence its name, which in French means

  • allemontite (mineral)

    Allemontite, the mineral arsenic antimonide (AsSb). It commonly occurs in veins, as at Allemont, Isère, Fr.; Valtellina, Italy; and the Comstock Lode, Nevada. It also is present in a lithium pegmatite at Varutr?sk, Swed. Polished sections of most specimens of allemontite show an intergrowth of

  • Allen Telescope Array

    extraterrestrial intelligence: Radio searches: The Allen Telescope Array (ATA, named after its principal funder, American technologist Paul Allen) has 42 small (6 metres [20 feet] in diameter) antennas. When complete, the ATA will have 350 antennas and be hundreds of times faster than previous experiments in the search for transmissions…

  • Allen Toussaint

    During the 1960s Allen Toussaint took over the mantle of the Crescent City’s musical master chef from Dave Bartholomew. Acting as songwriter, pianist, and producer, Toussaint was responsible for national hits by Ernie K-Doe, Chris Kenner, Jessie Hill, Aaron Neville, Irma Thomas, and the Showmen,

  • Allen wrench (tool)

    wrench: …usually referred to as an Allen wrench; it consists of a hexagonal bar of tool steel shaped into the form of an L, either end of which fits into the recess.

  • Allen’s bush baby (primate)

    bush baby: The larger Allen’s bush baby (G. alleni) and its relatives live in the rainforests of west-central Africa, where they feed on fallen fruits and the insects that they find in them; they may be generically distinct.

  • Allen’s hummingbird (bird)

    hummingbird: …and Central America and the Allen’s hummingbird breeds in the coastal regions of California.

  • Allen, Arthur Leigh (American schoolteacher)

    Zodiac killer: …suspect most often cited was Arthur Leigh Allen (1933–92), a Vallejo, California, schoolteacher who had been institutionalized in 1975 for child molestation, though his identification with the Zodiac killer has never been substantiated.

  • Allen, Bennie (American billiards player)

    Ralph Greenleaf: …Greenleaf attained prominence by defeating Bennie Allen, at that time (1913–15) the world pocket billiards champion, in an exhibition match at Monmouth. In Detroit, Mich., in 1929 he made a run of 126 (a record for championship play on a table measuring 5 by 10 ft [152 by 305 cm]),…

  • Allen, Betty (American opera singer)

    Betty Allen, (Elizabeth Louise Allen), American opera singer (born March 17, 1927, Campbell, Ohio—died June 22, 2009, Valhalla, N.Y.), was part of the post-World War II wave of African American singers on the international stage. Allen was first exposed to opera by listening to a neighbour’s radio,

  • Allen, Bill (American disc jockey)

    WLAC: Nashville's Late Night R & B Beacon: Bill (“Hoss”) Allen—brought fame to themselves and WLAC by playing rhythm and blues, at least partly in response to the requests of returning World War II veterans who had been exposed to the new music in other parts of the country. Nobles, who joined WLAC…

  • Allen, Bill J. (American businessman)

    Ted Stevens: …investigating the senator’s ties to Bill J. Allen, a former oil-service company executive who had been accused of bribing members of the state legislature. After Allen claimed that he had paid for renovations to Stevens’s home in Girdwood, Alaska, and even had provided workers for the job, Stevens was indicted…

  • Allen, Bog of (peat bogs, Ireland)

    Bog of Allen, group of peat bogs between the Liffey and the Shannon rivers in east-central Ireland in Counties Kildare, Offaly, Laoighis, and Westmeath. Some 370 square miles (958 square km) in area, it is developed extensively for fuel for power stations; the cutover land is used for grazing. The

  • Allen, Bryan (American athlete)

    Paul Beattie MacCready: …and piloted by 137-pound (62-kilogram) Bryan Allen, a bicyclist and hang-glider enthusiast, completed the course required to win the Kremer Prize of £50,000 ($95,000), clearing a 10-foot- (3-metre-) high start-and-finish line while making a figure-eight flight around two pylons set half a mile apart. The total distance flown was 1.15…

  • Allen, Dave (Irish comedian)

    Dave Allen, (David Tynan O’Mahoney), Irish comedian (born July 6, 1936, Tallaght, County Dublin, Ire.—died March 10, 2005, London, Eng.), mocked the absurdities of society, politics, and religion—particularly the Roman Catholic Church and its clergy—usually while he perched casually on a tall c

  • Allen, Dave (British musician)

    Gang of Four: March 25, 1956, London), and Dave Allen (b. December 23, 1955, Kendal, Cumbria).

  • Allen, Dede (American film editor)

    Dede Allen, (Dorothea Corothers Allen), American film editor (born Dec. 3, 1923, Cleveland, Ohio—died April 17, 2010, Los Angeles, Calif.), helped to revolutionize film editing in Hollywood with her innovative work on such major motion pictures as The Hustler (1961) and Bonnie and Clyde (1967).

  • Allen, Dorothea Corothers (American film editor)

    Dede Allen, (Dorothea Corothers Allen), American film editor (born Dec. 3, 1923, Cleveland, Ohio—died April 17, 2010, Los Angeles, Calif.), helped to revolutionize film editing in Hollywood with her innovative work on such major motion pictures as The Hustler (1961) and Bonnie and Clyde (1967).

  • Allen, E. J. (American detective)

    Allan Pinkerton, Scottish-born detective and founder of a famous American private detective agency. Pinkerton was the son of a police sergeant who died when Allan was a child, leaving the family in great poverty. Allan found work as a cooper and soon became involved in Chartism, a mass movement

  • Allen, Edgar (American embryologist)

    Edward Adelbert Doisy: …he worked with the embryologist Edgar Allen in developing assay techniques that facilitated research on sex hormones. Doisy and his associates isolated the sex hormones estrone (theelin, 1929; the first estrogen to be crystallized), estriol (theelol, 1930), and estradiol (dihydrotheelin, 1935). Vitamin K, a substance that encourages blood clotting, had…

  • Allen, Elizabeth Anne Chase Akers (American journalist and poet)

    Elizabeth Anne Chase Akers Allen, American journalist and poet, remembered chiefly for her sentimental poem “Rock Me to Sleep,” which found especial popularity during the Civil War. Elizabeth Chase grew up in Farmington, Maine, where she attended Farmington Academy (later Maine State Teachers

  • Allen, Elizabeth Louise (American opera singer)

    Betty Allen, (Elizabeth Louise Allen), American opera singer (born March 17, 1927, Campbell, Ohio—died June 22, 2009, Valhalla, N.Y.), was part of the post-World War II wave of African American singers on the international stage. Allen was first exposed to opera by listening to a neighbour’s radio,

  • Allen, Ethan (United States soldier)

    Ethan Allen, soldier and frontiersman, leader of the Green Mountain Boys during the American Revolution. After fighting in the French and Indian War (1754–63), Allen settled in what is now Vermont. At the outbreak of the American Revolution, he raised his force of Green Mountain Boys (organized in

  • Allen, Florence Ellinwood (American jurist)

    Florence Ellinwood Allen, American jurist who became the first woman to serve on the bench in a number of state courts and one federal jurisdiction. Allen was a descendant of American Revolutionary War hero Ethan Allen. She graduated from Western Reserve University’s College for Women in 1904 and

  • Allen, Forrest Clare (American basketball coach)

    Phog Allen, American college basketball coach who is regarded as the first great basketball coach. He was also instrumental in making basketball an Olympic sport. From 1905 to 1907 at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Allen played for James Naismith, who invented basketball. Allen coached the

  • Allen, Frances E. (American computer scientist)

    Frances E. Allen, American computer scientist and in 2006 the first woman to win the A.M. Turing Award, the highest honour in computer science, for her “pioneering contributions to the theory and practice of optimizing compiler techniques that laid the foundation for modern optimizing compilers and

  • Allen, Fred (American comedian)

    Fred Allen, American humorist whose laconic style, dry wit, and superb timing influenced a generation of radio and television performers. While working as a stack boy in the Boston Public Library, the young Sullivan came across a book on juggling from which he picked up that craft. He began

  • Allen, Gene (American art director)
  • Allen, George (American football coach)

    George Allen, American professional football coach. Allen attended Alma College (Michigan) and Marquette University (Wisconsin) and received an M.S. from the University of Michigan (1947). After coaching teams at Morningside College (Iowa) and Whittier College (California), he entered the National

  • Allen, George (United States senator)

    Tim Kaine: …narrowly defeated his Republican opponent, George Allen, the son of the popular Washington Redskins football coach of the same name. Kaine took office in 2013.

  • Allen, George Herbert (American football coach)

    George Allen, American professional football coach. Allen attended Alma College (Michigan) and Marquette University (Wisconsin) and received an M.S. from the University of Michigan (1947). After coaching teams at Morningside College (Iowa) and Whittier College (California), he entered the National

  • Allen, Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie (American comedian)

    Gracie Allen, American comedian who, with her husband, George Burns, formed the comedy team Burns and Allen. Allen made her vaudeville stage debut at age three with her father, the singer and dancer Edward Allen. She performed in an act with her sisters during her teen years but had abandoned the

  • Allen, Gracie (American comedian)

    Gracie Allen, American comedian who, with her husband, George Burns, formed the comedy team Burns and Allen. Allen made her vaudeville stage debut at age three with her father, the singer and dancer Edward Allen. She performed in an act with her sisters during her teen years but had abandoned the

  • Allen, Henry (American musician)

    Henry Allen, African-American jazz musician, one of the major trumpeters of the swing era, he also sang and led small bands. The son of a longtime New Orleans brass-band leader, Allen played in his father’s band before joining King Oliver’s big band in the Midwest in 1927 and then Luis Russell’s

  • Allen, Henry James, Jr. (American musician)

    Henry Allen, African-American jazz musician, one of the major trumpeters of the swing era, he also sang and led small bands. The son of a longtime New Orleans brass-band leader, Allen played in his father’s band before joining King Oliver’s big band in the Midwest in 1927 and then Luis Russell’s

  • Allen, Hervey (American author)

    Hervey Allen, American poet, biographer, and novelist who had a great impact on popular literature with his historical novel Anthony Adverse. Allen’s first published work was a book of poetry, Ballads of the Border (1916). During the 1920s he established a reputation as a poet, publishing several

  • Allen, Heywood (American actor and director)

    Woody Allen, American motion-picture director, screenwriter, actor, comedian, playwright, and author, best known for his bittersweet comic films containing elements of parody, slapstick, and the absurd but who also made weighty dramas, often with dark themes and bleak landscapes reminiscent of the

  • Allen, Hoss (American disc jockey)

    WLAC: Nashville's Late Night R & B Beacon: Bill (“Hoss”) Allen—brought fame to themselves and WLAC by playing rhythm and blues, at least partly in response to the requests of returning World War II veterans who had been exposed to the new music in other parts of the country. Nobles, who joined WLAC…

  • Allen, Ivan Earnest, Jr. (American politician)

    Ivan Earnest Allen, Jr., American politician (born March 15, 1911, Atlanta, Ga.—died July 2, 2003, Atlanta), served as mayor of Atlanta from 1962 to 1970, and, having discarded his previous segregationist stance, led the city in integrating schools, businesses, and workforces at a time when other S

  • Allen, James Alfred Van (American physicist)

    James A. Van Allen, American physicist, whose discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts, two zones of radiation encircling Earth, brought about new understanding of cosmic radiation and its effects on Earth. Van Allen attended Iowa Wesleyan College (B.S., 1935) and the University of Iowa (M.S.,

  • Allen, Jay Presson (American screenwriter and playwright)

    Jay Presson Allen, (Jacqueline Presson), American screenwriter and playwright (born March 3, 1922, Fort Worth, Texas—died May 1, 2006, New York, N.Y.), was best known for the scripts she adapted from novels and was credited with having developed some of the best and most memorable women’s stage a

  • Allen, Jo Lynn (American businesswoman and philanthropist)

    Paul Allen: …Allen cofounded, with his sister Jo Lynn (“Jody”) Allen Patton, the personal holding company Vulcan Inc. to oversee his investments. He became the owner of the professional basketball team the Portland Trail Blazers (from 1988) and a cofounder, with Patton, of the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation (1990)—a private foundation…

  • Allen, Jody (American businesswoman and philanthropist)

    Paul Allen: …Allen cofounded, with his sister Jo Lynn (“Jody”) Allen Patton, the personal holding company Vulcan Inc. to oversee his investments. He became the owner of the professional basketball team the Portland Trail Blazers (from 1988) and a cofounder, with Patton, of the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation (1990)—a private foundation…

  • Allen, John (American designer)

    roller coaster: Introduction of steel coasters: …need a degree in psychology,” John Allen, president of Philadelphia Toboggan, once said. “A roller coaster is as theatrically contrived as a Broadway play.” Allen’s advancements in roller coaster technology and design techniques included precise engineering, parabolic hill shapes, and aluminum cars. But the advent of steel coasters did not…

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