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  • Aberfan (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Merthyr Tydfil: Aberfan, in the south, was the site of a major disaster in 1966, when a rain-soaked slag heap avalanched upon the mining village, killing 144 people, 116 of them children. Extensive land reclamation programs have eliminated slag heaps and other eyesores in the valley to…

  • Abergavenny (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Abergavenny, town (community), historic and present county of Monmouthshire (Sir Fynwy), southern Wales. It lies at the confluence of the Rivers Gavenny and Usk. The strategic nature of the site, guarding a main valley corridor between the Black Mountains and the Brecon Beacons into South Wales,

  • Abergele (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Conwy: The town of Abergele, located east of Colwyn Bay, was one of the first places in North Wales where “sea bathing” became popular. It is now a thriving market centre with weekly cattle markets. The coastal resorts of Conwy, Penmaenmawr, Llanfairfechan, and Llandudno all have lengthy sand beaches.…

  • Aberhart, William (Canadian politician)

    William Aberhart, the first Social Credit Party premier of Alberta, during and after the Great Depression. Trained as a teacher, Aberhart was a high-school principal and Protestant lay preacher in Calgary, Alta. (1910–35). Beginning in the mid-1920s he became widely known as a radio evangelist,

  • Aberhonddu (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Brecon, cathedral town, Powys county, historic county of Brecknockshire, southern Wales. It lies on the River Usk where it is joined by the Rivers Honddu and Tarell, in the northern portion of Brecon Beacons National Park. The town grew up around a Norman castle built in 1092. The Benedictine

  • Abernathy, Ralph David (American religious leader and civil-rights activist)

    Ralph David Abernathy, black American pastor and civil rights leader who was Martin Luther King’s chief aide and closest associate during the civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s. The son of a successful farmer, Abernathy was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1948 and graduated with a B.S.

  • Abernon, Sir John D’ (English aristocrat)

    metalwork: England: …in existence is that of Sir John D’Abernon (died 1277) at Stoke d’Abernon, Surrey. Traces can still be seen in many brasses of the colours that originally enlivened them.

  • Abernon, Yehudi Menuhin, Lord Menuhin of Stoke d’ (American violinist and conductor)

    Yehudi Menuhin, Lord Menuhin of Stoke d’Abernon, one of the leading violin virtuosos of the 20th century. Menuhin grew up in San Francisco, where he studied violin from age four and where his performance of Felix Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto at age seven caused a sensation. He studied in Paris

  • Aberpennar (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Mountain Ash, industrial town, Rhondda Cynon Taff county borough, historic county of Glamorgan (Morgannwg), southern Wales. It lies on a small tributary of the River Taff, about 6 miles (10 km) north of Pontypridd. The town’s growth dates almost entirely from about 1850 with the exploitation of

  • aberration (optics)

    Aberration, in optical systems, such as lenses and curved mirrors, the deviation of light rays through lenses, causing images of objects to be blurred. In an ideal system, every point on the object will focus to a point of zero size on the image. Practically, however, each image point occupies a

  • aberration, constant of (astronomy)

    Constant of aberration, in astronomy, the maximum amount of the apparent yearly aberrational displacement of a star or other celestial body, resulting from Earth’s orbital motion around the Sun. The value of the constant, 20.49551″ of arc, depends on the ratio of Earth’s orbital velocity to the

  • Abert, Lake (lake, Oregon, United States)

    lake: Basins formed by tectonism, volcanism, and landslides: Abert Lake, in Oregon, lies in the depression formed by a tilted fault block against the higher block. Indeed, many lakes in the western United States are located in depressions formed through faulting, including Lake Tahoe, in the Sierra Nevada, California. Great Salt Lake, Utah,…

  • Abertawe (county, Wales, United Kingdom)

    Swansea, county, southwestern Wales, comprising the city of Swansea as well as the entire peninsula of Gower in the south and west, the lower valley of the River Loughor in the northwest, and the foothills of Black Mountain in the north. Gower is a rolling plateau noted for its sandy beaches and

  • Abertawe (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Swansea, city, Swansea county, historic county of Glamorgan (Morgannwg), southwestern Wales. It lies along the Bristol Channel at the mouth of the River Tawe. Swansea is the second largest city in Wales (after Cardiff). In the early 12th century the Norman Henry de Newburgh built a castle there,

  • Aberteifi (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Cardigan, town, Ceredigion county (historic county of Cardiganshire), southwestern Wales. It lies on the River Teifi, a short distance from its mouth on Cardigan Bay. The town grew up adjacent to a 12th-century Norman castle overlooking the Teifi. An arched bridge across the river is said to date

  • Abertillery (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Abertillery, town, Blaenau Gwent county borough, historic county of Monmouthshire (Sir Fynwy), southern Wales. It is located in the valley of the River Ebbw. Coal mining was its main economic interest from about 1850 until the last mines closed in the 1980s. Nantyglo, to the north, was the site of

  • Aberystwyth (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Aberystwyth, coastal town, Ceredigion county, historic county of Cardiganshire, western Wales. It is situated where the River Rheidol flows into Cardigan Bay. Traces of extensive Iron Age earthworks have been found on the hill Pen Dinas, which overlooks the old port and town. The medieval walled

  • Aberystwyth Grit Formation (geological formation, United Kingdom)

    Silurian Period: Platform margins: …and fine sandstones constituting the Aberystwyth Grit Formation to a deepwater basinal setting in west-central Wales. Less commonly, Silurian shales passively accumulated in broad platform settings. The Longmaqi Formation of the Yangtze platform in South China is one such shale body, which indicates the base of the Silurian System throughout…

  • abetalipoproteinemia (pathology)

    metabolic disease: Lipoprotein disorders: …of microsomal transfer protein causes abetalipoproteinemia, an autosomal recessive condition characterized by the virtual absence of VLDL and LDL. Triglycerides accumulate in the gastrointestinal tract and liver, and there are low blood levels of cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. Persons with abetalipoproteinemia have severe fat malabsorption and develop neurological symptoms…

  • abettor (law)

    Abettor, in law, a person who becomes equally guilty in the crime of another by knowingly and voluntarily aiding the criminal during the act itself. An abettor is one kind of accomplice (q.v.), the other being an accessory, who aids the criminal prior to or after the

  • ABG test (medicine)

    oxygen therapy: Flow rate: …in the blood include the arterial blood gas (ABG) test and the pulse oximetry test. In the ABG test, blood is drawn from an artery, and blood acidity, oxygen, and carbon dioxide levels are measured. In pulse oximetry, a probe, generally placed over the end of a finger, is used…

  • Abgar legend (Christian legend)

    Abgar legend, in early Christian times, a popular myth that Jesus had an exchange of letters with King Abgar V Ukkama of Osroene, whose capital was Edessa, a Mesopotamian city on the northern fringe of the Syrian plateau. According to the legend, the king, afflicted with leprosy, had heard of

  • Abgar VII (king of Osro?ne)

    Osro?ne: …the Roman emperor Trajan deposed Abgar VII, king of Osro?ne, after quelling a Mesopotamian revolt of ad 116, and foreign princes occupied the throne. In ad 123, however, Ma?nu VII, brother of Abgar, became king under the protection of the emperor Hadrian. Thereafter the state maintained some autonomy until 216,…

  • Abgesang (music)

    minnesinger: … and a third section, or Abgesang (the terms derive from the later meistersingers); the formal ratio between Aufgesang and Abgesang is variable. The basic aab pattern was subject to much variation (see Bar form).

  • Abhā (Saudi Arabia)

    Abhā, city, southwestern Saudi Arabia. It is situated on a plain at the western edge of Mount al-Hijāz and is surrounded by hills. The valley of the Wadi Abhā near the city is filled with gardens, fields, and streams. The city consists of four quarters, the largest of which contains an old

  • Abhainn Mhór, An (river, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    River Blackwater, river in Northern Ireland, rising in the uplands near the Dungannon Fermanagh district boundaries and fed by a network of small streams northeast of a drainage divide near Fivemiletown. The river flows northeast through southern Dungannon district and then turns southeast, forming

  • Abhainn Mhór, An (river, Ireland)

    River Blackwater, river rising in the uplands on the border of Counties Cork and Kerry, Ireland, and flowing 104 miles (167 km) to the sea at Youghal, County Cork. In its upper course the Blackwater flows between uplands and a sandstone ridge with summits above 2,200 feet (670 m). East–west lines

  • Abhandlung über den Ursprung der Sprache (work by Herder)

    Johann Gottfried von Herder: Career at Bückeburg: …which outlines his metaphysics, and Abhandlung über den Ursprung der Sprache (1772; “Essay on the Origin of Language”), which finds the origin of language in human nature. For Herder, knowledge is possible only through the medium of language. Although the individual and the world are united in feeling, they separate…

  • Abhandlung über die Shakespearo-Manie (work by Grabbe)

    Christian Dietrich Grabbe: He is also known for Abhandlung über die Shakespearo-Manie (1827; “Essay on Shakespeare Mania”), in which he attacks Shakespeare and advocates an independent national drama. His other major works are the tragedy Herzog Theodor von Gothland (1827; “Duke Theodor of Gothland”), noted for its scenes of violence; and two plays…

  • Abhandlung von der Fuge (work by Marpurg)

    Friedrich Wilhelm Marpurg: …music, notably the fugue in Abhandlung von der Fuge (1753–54). These works are valuable to students of 18th-century music history, theory, and practice. Significant as well is his eventual endorsement of instrumental music after his initial disregard for it; in this, he proved emblematic of his time. His compositions include…

  • Abhandlung von der Luft und dem Feuer (work by Scheele)

    Carl Wilhelm Scheele: Research: …described in his only book, Chemische Abhandlung von der Luft und dem Feuer (1777; “Chemical Treatise on Air and Fire”). Scheele made his discovery independently, but simultaneously with the English clergyman and scientist Joseph Priestley. Like most chemists, they were convinced that air consists of at least two different kinds…

  • Abhandlungen der Fries’schen Schule (German journal)

    Kantianism: Psychological Neo-Kantianism: …Nelson and published in the Abhandlungen der Fries’schen Schule (1904 ff.; “Acts of the Friesian School”). Even this title suggests an intimate agreement with the Kantianism of Fries’s Neue Kritik der Vernunft (1807; “New Critique of Reason”), and Nelson, indeed, is regarded as the founder of the Neo-Friesian school. At…

  • abhava (Indian philosophy)

    Vaisheshika: …these six was later added abhava, nonexistence or absence. Though negative in content, the impression it makes is positive; one has a perception of an absence where one misses something. Four such absences are recognized: previous absence, as of a new product; later absence, as of a destroyed object; total…

  • Abhaya (Hindu goddess)

    Chandi, (Sanskrit: “The Fierce”) demon-destroying form of the Hindu goddess Shakti, particularly popular in eastern India. She is known by various names, such as Mahamaya (“Great Magic”) or Abhaya (“She Who Is Without Fear”). Her representation is similar to that of Durga, another form of Shakti.

  • Abhayagiri (monastery, Anurādhapura, Sri Lanka)

    Abhayagiri, important ancient Theravāda Buddhist monastic centre (vihāra) built by King Va??agāma?i Abhaya (29–17 bc) on the northern side of Anurādhapura, the capital of Ceylon (Sri Lanka) at that time. Its importance lay, in part, in the fact that religious and political power were closely

  • Abhayagiriviharavasi (Buddhism)

    Buddhism: Theravada: The cosmopolitan Abhayagiriviharavasi maintained open relations with Mahayana and later Vajrayana monks and welcomed new ideas from India. The Mahaviharavasi—with whom the third group, the Jetavanaviharavasi, was loosely associated—established the first monastery in Sri Lanka and preserved intact the original Theravadin teachings.

  • Abhdisho bar Berikha (Syrian theologian)

    Abhdisho bar Berikha, Syrian Christian theologian and poet who was the last important representative of the Nestorian tradition, a theological school emphasizing a rational, critical interpretation of early Christian doctrine. The sect, centred in ancient Antioch, countered the speculative

  • abhibhāyātana (Buddhist philosophy)

    Abhibhvāyatana, (Sanskrit: “total mastery over the senses”) in Buddhist philosophy, one of the preparatory stages of meditation, in which the senses are completely restrained. In Buddhist canons, abhibhvāyatana is divided into eight substages during which man comes to realize that physical forms in

  • abhibhvāyatana (Buddhist philosophy)

    Abhibhvāyatana, (Sanskrit: “total mastery over the senses”) in Buddhist philosophy, one of the preparatory stages of meditation, in which the senses are completely restrained. In Buddhist canons, abhibhvāyatana is divided into eight substages during which man comes to realize that physical forms in

  • Abhidhamma (Buddhism)

    Buddhism: The Pali canon (Tipitaka): …the interest in scholasticism (Pali: Abhidhamma).

  • Abhidhamma Pitaka (Buddhist canon)

    Abhidhamma Pitaka, (Pali: “Basket of Special Doctrine” or “Further Doctrine”) the third—and historically the latest—of the three “baskets,” or collections of texts, that together compose the Pali canon of Theravada Buddhism, the form predominant in Southeast Asia and Sri Lanka (Ceylon). The other

  • Abhidhammattha-sangaha (work by Anuruddha)

    Abhidhammattha-sangaha, (Pāli: “Summary of the Meaning of Abhidhamma”) a highly popular primer, or digest, of the Abhidhamma corpus (the scholastic section of the canon) of the Theravada tradition. The Abhidhammattha-sangaha was composed in India or in Myanmar (Burma), the chief centre for

  • Abhidhammavatara (work by Buddhadatta)

    Abhidhammavatara, (Pali: “Introduction to the Abhidhamma”) the earliest effort at systematizing, in the form of a manual, the doctrines dealt with in the Abhidhamma (scholastic) section of the Theravada Buddhist canon. The Abhidhammavatara was written in Pali, apparently in the 5th century, by the

  • Abhidharma (Buddhism)

    Buddhism: The Pali canon (Tipitaka): …the interest in scholasticism (Pali: Abhidhamma).

  • Abhidharma Pitaka (Buddhist canon)

    Abhidhamma Pitaka, (Pali: “Basket of Special Doctrine” or “Further Doctrine”) the third—and historically the latest—of the three “baskets,” or collections of texts, that together compose the Pali canon of Theravada Buddhism, the form predominant in Southeast Asia and Sri Lanka (Ceylon). The other

  • Abhidharmakosha (work by Vasubandhu)

    Abhidharmakosha, encyclopaedic compendium of Abhidharma (scholasticism). Its author, Vasubandhu, who lived in the 4th or 5th century in the northwestern part of India, wrote the work while he was still a monk of the Sarvastivada (Doctrine That All Is Real) order, before he embraced Mahayana, on

  • Abhidharmakosha-shastra (work by Vasubandhu)

    Abhidharmakosha, encyclopaedic compendium of Abhidharma (scholasticism). Its author, Vasubandhu, who lived in the 4th or 5th century in the northwestern part of India, wrote the work while he was still a monk of the Sarvastivada (Doctrine That All Is Real) order, before he embraced Mahayana, on

  • abhijna (Buddhist philosophy)

    Abhijna, (Sanskrit: “supernatural knowledge”) in Buddhist philosophy, miraculous power obtained especially through meditation and wisdom. Usually five kinds of abhijna are enumerated: the ability (1) to travel any distance or take on any form at will, (2) to see everything, (3) to hear everything,

  • Abhijnanashakuntala (work by Kalidasa)

    Abhijnanashakuntala, (Sanskrit: “The Recognition of Shakuntala”) drama by Kalidasa composed about the 5th century ce that is generally considered to be the greatest Indian literary work of any period. Taken from legend, the work tells of the seduction of the nymph Shakuntala by King Dushyanta, his

  • abhimukhī (Buddhism)

    bhūmi: …sudurjayā (“hard to conquer”), (6) abhimukhī (“turning toward” both transmigration and nirvana), (7) dūra?gamā (“far-going”), (8) acalā (“immovable”), (9) sādhumatī (“good-minded”), and (10) dharmameghā (showered with “clouds of dharma,” or universal truth).

  • Abhinavagupta (Indian philosopher)

    Abhinavagupta, philosopher, ascetic, and aesthetician, as well as an outstanding representative of the “recognition” (pratyabhijna) school of Kashmiri Shaivite monism. This school conceived of the god Shiva (the manifestation of ultimate reality), the individual soul, and the universe as

  • abhinna (Buddhist philosophy)

    Abhijna, (Sanskrit: “supernatural knowledge”) in Buddhist philosophy, miraculous power obtained especially through meditation and wisdom. Usually five kinds of abhijna are enumerated: the ability (1) to travel any distance or take on any form at will, (2) to see everything, (3) to hear everything,

  • ābhīra (people)

    India: Oligarchies and kingdoms: The Abhiras lived in scattered settlements in various parts of western and central India as far as the Deccan. Most of these tribes claimed descent from the ancient lineages of the Puranas, and some of them were later connected with the rise of Rajput dynasties.

  • Abhisamayalambkaraloka (Buddhist text)

    Abhisamayalambkaraloka, (Sanskrit: “Illumination of the Abhisamayalambkara”) important contribution to exegetical literature on the Prajnaparamita- (“Perfection of Wisdom”) sutras of the Mahayana Buddhist tradition and one of the texts most often studied in Tibetan monasteries. The

  • abhi?eka (religion)

    Abhiseka, (“sprinkling”), in esoteric Buddhism, a purificatory or initiatory rite in which a candidate is sprinkled with water or other liquid, signifying a change in status. Originally, abhiseka was an integral part of the ancient Indian royal consecration rite. Water from the four oceans was p

  • abhiseka (religion)

    Abhiseka, (“sprinkling”), in esoteric Buddhism, a purificatory or initiatory rite in which a candidate is sprinkled with water or other liquid, signifying a change in status. Originally, abhiseka was an integral part of the ancient Indian royal consecration rite. Water from the four oceans was p

  • Abhisit Vejjajiva (prime minister of Thailand)

    Thailand: Yellow shirts and red shirts: Within two weeks, Abhisit Vejjajiva, leader of the opposition Democrat Party, was chosen by a special parliamentary vote to become the new prime minister—the fifth in a period of just over two years.

  • Abia (state, Nigeria)

    Abia, state, east-central Nigeria. Abia was administratively created in 1991 from the eastern half of former Imo state. It is bordered by the states of Enugu and Ebonyi to the north, Akwa Ibom to the east and southeast, Rivers to the south and southwest, and Imo and Anambra to the west. Abia

  • Abia (biblical figures)

    Abijah, (“Yahweh Is My Father”), any of nine different persons mentioned in the Bible, of whom the most noteworthy are the following: (1) The son and successor of Rehoboam, king of Judah (II Chronicles 12:16, 13), who reigned about two years (c. 915–913 bc). (2) The second son of Samuel (I Samuel

  • Abiathar (biblical figure)

    Abiathar, in the Old Testament, son of Ahimelech, priest of Nob. He was the sole survivor of a massacre carried out by Doeg. Fleeing to David, he remained with him throughout his wanderings and his reign. He was loyal through the rebellion of Absalom, but he supported Adonijah against Solomon.

  • ?Abīd al-Bukhārī (Moroccan military organization)

    ?Abīd al-Bukhārī, army of Saharan blacks organized in Morocco by the ?Alawī ruler Ismā?īl (reigned 1672–1727). Earlier rulers had recruited black slaves (Arabic: ?abīd) into their armies, and these men or their descendants eventually formed the core of Ismā?īl’s guard. The ?abīd were sent to a

  • Abidatsuma-kusha-ron (work by Vasubandhu)

    Abhidharmakosha, encyclopaedic compendium of Abhidharma (scholasticism). Its author, Vasubandhu, who lived in the 4th or 5th century in the northwestern part of India, wrote the work while he was still a monk of the Sarvastivada (Doctrine That All Is Real) order, before he embraced Mahayana, on

  • Abidjan (national capital, C?te d’Ivoire)

    Abidjan, chief port, de facto capital, and largest city of C?te d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast). It lies along the ébrié Lagoon, which is separated from the Gulf of Guinea and the Atlantic by the Vridi Plage sandbar. A village in 1898, it became a town in 1903. Abidjan was a rail terminus from 1904 but had

  • Abiel Smith School (school, Boston, Massachusetts, United States)

    African Meeting House: Origins: …new building and became the Smith Primary and Grammar School. Owned by the city, the school had an endowment from Abiel Smith, a wealthy Boston businessman who was an early supporter of the education of black youth.

  • Abies (tree, Abies genus)

    Fir, (genus Abies), genus of more than 40 species of evergreen trees of the conifer family Pinaceae. Although several other coniferous trees are commonly called firs—e.g., the Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga), the hemlock fir (see hemlock), and the joint fir (see Ephedra), true firs are native to North

  • Abies alba (tree)

    Silver fir, (Abies alba), tree growing to a height of 150 feet; abundant in the mountainous regions of central and southern

  • Abies balsamea (tree)

    Canada balsam: …greenish liquid exuded by the balsam fir of North America, Abies balsamea. It is actually a turpentine, belonging to the class of oleoresins (natural products consisting of a resin dissolved in an essential oil), and not a balsam.

  • Abies grandis (tree)

    tree: Tree height growth: For example, those of the grand fir (Abies grandis) in the area of Vancouver are preformed in October, so that at spring bud break those height growth units elongate and develop; a new bud is then initiated in July. Thus, the environmental conditions between July and October affect the number…

  • abietic acid (chemical compound)

    Abietic acid, the most abundant of several closely related organic acids that constitute most of rosin, the solid portion of the oleoresin of coniferous trees. Commercial abietic acid is usually a glassy or partly crystalline, yellowish solid that melts at temperatures as low as 85° C (185° F). It

  • Abigail (biblical figure)

    Abigail, in the Old Testament, the wife of Nabal of southern Judah, on whose death she became one of the first wives of David (1 Samuel 25) and the mother of his son Chileab. The name Abigail was also borne by David’s sister (1 Chronicles 2:16), who was the mother of Amasa, commander of the army

  • Abijah (biblical figures)

    Abijah, (“Yahweh Is My Father”), any of nine different persons mentioned in the Bible, of whom the most noteworthy are the following: (1) The son and successor of Rehoboam, king of Judah (II Chronicles 12:16, 13), who reigned about two years (c. 915–913 bc). (2) The second son of Samuel (I Samuel

  • Abijah’s Luce (American poet and activist)

    Lucy Terry, poet, storyteller, and activist of colonial and postcolonial America. Terry was taken from Africa to Rhode Island by slave traders at a very young age. She was baptized a Christian at age five, with the approval of her owner, Ebenezer Wells of Deerfield, Massachusetts; she became a full

  • Abijah, Luce (American poet and activist)

    Lucy Terry, poet, storyteller, and activist of colonial and postcolonial America. Terry was taken from Africa to Rhode Island by slave traders at a very young age. She was baptized a Christian at age five, with the approval of her owner, Ebenezer Wells of Deerfield, Massachusetts; she became a full

  • Abijah, Lucy (American poet and activist)

    Lucy Terry, poet, storyteller, and activist of colonial and postcolonial America. Terry was taken from Africa to Rhode Island by slave traders at a very young age. She was baptized a Christian at age five, with the approval of her owner, Ebenezer Wells of Deerfield, Massachusetts; she became a full

  • Abildgaard, Nicolai Abraham (Danish painter)

    Nicolai Abraham Abildgaard, renowned Danish painter of the late 18th century and one of the early Neoclassicists. During 1772–77 Abildgaard studied in Rome, where he was primarily influenced by antique sculpture and Roman wall paintings. His style was classical, though with a romantic trend, and he

  • Abilene (Kansas, United States)

    Abilene, city, seat (1861) of Dickinson county, east-central Kansas, U.S. The city lies along the Smoky Hill River. Settled in 1858 and known as Mud Creek, it was named about 1860 for the biblical Abilene (which means “grassy plain”). Development was slow until Joseph McCoy, a cattle entrepreneur

  • Abilene (Texas, United States)

    Abilene, city, seat (1883) of Taylor county (and partly in Jones county), west-central Texas, U.S. It lies on low, rolling plains 153 miles (246 km) west of Fort Worth. Founded in 1881 as the new railhead (built by the Texas and Pacific Railway) for the overland Texas cattle drives, it took not

  • Abilgaard, Nicolaj-Abraham (Danish painter)

    Nicolai Abraham Abildgaard, renowned Danish painter of the late 18th century and one of the early Neoclassicists. During 1772–77 Abildgaard studied in Rome, where he was primarily influenced by antique sculpture and Roman wall paintings. His style was classical, though with a romantic trend, and he

  • Abilities of Man, The (book by Spearman)

    Charles E. Spearman: …is to be found in The Abilities of Man (1927). His historical survey, Psychology Down the Ages, 2 vol. (1937), was followed by Human Ability (1950, with L.W. Jones).

  • ability (psychology)

    human intelligence: Psychometric theories: … are levels of gradually narrowing abilities, ending with the specific abilities identified by Spearman. Cattell, for example, suggested in Abilities: Their Structure, Growth, and Action (1971) that general ability can be subdivided into two further kinds, “fluid” and “crystallized.” Fluid abilities are the reasoning and problem-solving abilities measured by tests…

  • ability grouping (education)

    Ability grouping, in the United States the separation of elementary and secondary students into classrooms or courses of instruction according to their actual or perceived ability levels. Opponents of ability grouping argue that such policies tend to segregate students along racial and

  • ability test (psychology)

    Aptitude test, examination that attempts to determine and measure a person’s ability to acquire, through future training, some specific set of skills (intellectual, motor, and so on). The tests assume that people differ in their special abilities and that these differences can be useful in

  • ability-to-pay principle

    taxation: The ability-to-pay principle: The ability-to-pay principle requires that the total tax burden will be distributed among individuals according to their capacity to bear it, taking into account all of the relevant personal characteristics. The most suitable taxes from this standpoint are personal levies (income, net worth,…

  • Abimelech (king of Shechem)

    biblical literature: The roles of Deborah, Gideon, and Jephthah: Abimelech, one of the 70 sons of the wives and concubines of Gideon, went to Shechem to solicit support for his attempt to establish a monarchy. After receiving financial support from those who controlled the treasury of the shrine of Baal-berith, he hired a band…

  • Abingdon (Virginia, United States)

    Abingdon, town, seat (1778) of Washington county, southwestern Virginia, U.S. It lies in the Blue Ridge highlands of the Appalachian Mountains, near the border with Tennessee, 15 miles (24 km) northeast of Bristol. Originally called “Wolf Hills” by frontiersman Daniel Boone as he passed through the

  • Abingdon (England, United Kingdom)

    Abingdon-on-Thames, town (parish), Vale of White Horse district, administrative county of Oxfordshire, historic county of Berkshire, south-central England. It lies south of Oxford at the confluence of the Rivers Thames and Ock. The town was founded by the Saxons and grew up around a Benedictine

  • Abingdon Island (island, Pacific Ocean)

    Pinta Island, one of the northernmost of the Galapagos Islands, in the eastern Pacific Ocean 600 miles (965 km) west of mainland Ecuador. It is an uninhabited island with an area of 20 square miles (52 square

  • Abingdon-on-Thames (England, United Kingdom)

    Abingdon-on-Thames, town (parish), Vale of White Horse district, administrative county of Oxfordshire, historic county of Berkshire, south-central England. It lies south of Oxford at the confluence of the Rivers Thames and Ock. The town was founded by the Saxons and grew up around a Benedictine

  • Abington (Massachusetts, United States)

    Abington, town (township), Plymouth county, eastern Massachusetts, U.S. It lies 19 miles (31 km) southeast of Boston and 4 miles (6 km) east of Brockton. Ames Nowell State Park is nearby (to the west). The area now occupied by the town was purchased in 1649 from Massasoit, chief of the Massachusett

  • Abington (Pennsylvania, United States)

    Abington, urban township, Montgomery county, southeastern Pennsylvania, U.S. Abington is a northern suburb of Philadelphia, encompassing the communities of Ardsley, Glenside, McKinley, Noble, North Glenside, and Roslyn. The area was inhabited by Delaware Indians when European settlers began

  • Abington, Fanny (British actress)

    Fanny Abington, English actress admired both for her craft and for her leadership in fashion. She was at first a flower girl, hence her later nickname, Nosegay Fan, and a street singer. Employment by a French milliner gave her taste in dress and a knowledge of French that she later found useful.

  • AbioCor artificial heart (medical device)

    artificial heart: Mechanical hearts: …self-contained artificial heart, called the AbioCor artificial heart. The patient survived 151 days.

  • Abiodun (African leader)

    Oyo empire: …not resolved until the alaafin Abiodun (reigned c. 1770–89) conquered his opponents in a bitter civil war and pursued a policy of economic development based primarily on the coastal trade with European merchants.

  • abiogenesis (biology)

    Abiogenesis, the idea that life arose from nonlife more than 3.5 billion years ago on Earth. Abiogenesis proposes that the first life-forms generated were very simple and through a gradual process became increasingly complex. Biogenesis, in which life is derived from the reproduction of other life,

  • Abiola, Moshood Kashimawo Olawale (Nigerian entrepreneur and politician)

    Moshood Kashimawo Olawale Abiola, Nigerian business executive, philanthropist, and politician who is hailed as a figure of democratic change in Nigeria. Abiola was born and raised in poverty but was a hard worker and a bright student. He attended the University of Glasgow, Scotland, on scholarship,

  • Abipón (people)

    Abipón, South American Indian people who formerly lived on the lower Bermejo River in the Argentine Gran Chaco. They spoke a language (also called Callaga) belonging to the Guaycuruan group of the Guaycurú-Charruan languages. The Abipón were divided into three dialect groups: the Nakaigetergehè

  • abiraterone (biochemistry)

    prostate cancer: Treatment: An antiandrogen called abiraterone inhibits the activity of an enzyme involved in testosterone synthesis in the testes and adrenal glands. Abiraterone prolongs survival in patients with metastatic (spreading) castration-resistant prostate cancer, which is usually refractory to hormone therapy. Its side effects appear to be limited primarily to hypertension,…

  • ābish Khātūn (Salghurid ruler)

    Salghurid dynasty: …year of independent rule (1263–64), ābish Khātūn married Mengü Temür, the son of the Il-Khanid ruler of Iran, who assumed de facto power. Following the death of Mengü Temür in 1282, the Il-Khanids assumed direct control of Fārs. ābish Khātūn died in captivity in Tabrīz several years later, in 1286.

  • Abish, Walter (American author)

    Walter Abish, Austrian-born American writer of experimental novels and short stories whose fiction takes as its subject language itself. Abish spent his childhood in Shanghai, where his family were refugees from Nazi-occupied Europe. In 1949 they moved to Israel, where Abish served in the army and

  • Abitibi Belt (geological region, Canada)

    Precambrian: Age and occurrence of greenstone-granite belts: …Slave province of Canada; the Abitibi, Wawa, Wabigoon, and Quetico belts of the Superior province of Canada; the Dharwar belts in India; and the Warrawoona and Yilgarn belts in Australia.

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