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  • Alectis crinitis (fish)

    pompano: The African pompano, or threadfish, also of the family Carangidae, is Alectis crinitis of the Atlantic and eastern Pacific oceans. It is about 90 cm long and, especially when young, has very long, threadlike rays extending from the dorsal and anal fins.

  • Alectoria (lichen)

    fungus: Form and function of lichens: Alectoria and Cladonia have haustoria that do not penetrate far beyond the algal cell wall. A few phycobionts, such as Coccomyxa and Stichococcus, which are not penetrated by haustoria, have thin-walled cells that are pressed close to fungal hyphae.

  • Alectoride (lichen)

    fungus: Form and function of lichens: Alectoria and Cladonia have haustoria that do not penetrate far beyond the algal cell wall. A few phycobionts, such as Coccomyxa and Stichococcus, which are not penetrated by haustoria, have thin-walled cells that are pressed close to fungal hyphae.

  • Alectoris chukar (bird)

    Chukar, popular small game bird, a species of partridge

  • Alectura lathami (bird)

    galliform: Nesting: …one species of brush turkey, Alectura lathami, indicate that the frequent opening of the mound may be as important for ventilation as for temperature control.

  • alef-null (mathematics)

    history of logic: The continuum problem and the axiom of constructibility: …number has the cardinality ?o (aleph-null), which is the cardinality of the set of natural numbers. The cardinality of the set of all sets of natural numbers, called ?1 (aleph-one), is equal to the cardinality of the set of all real numbers. The continuum hypothesis states that ?1 is the…

  • alef-one (mathematics)

    history of logic: The continuum problem and the axiom of constructibility: …natural numbers, called ?1 (aleph-one), is equal to the cardinality of the set of all real numbers. The continuum hypothesis states that ?1 is the second infinite cardinal—in other words, there does not exist any cardinality strictly between ?o and ?1. Despite its prominence, the problem of the continuum…

  • Alegre, Caetano da Costa (African poet)

    Caetano da Costa Alegre, first significant black African poet writing in Portuguese to deal with the theme of blackness. He was the literary ancestor to the later, more vehement modern poets. Alegre was born into a creole family but moved in 1882 to Portugal, where he enrolled in the Medical School

  • Alegre, Efraín (Paraguayan politician)

    Paraguay: Paraguay in the 21st century: …country, defeated the Liberal Party’s Efraín Alegre by capturing some 46 percent of the vote to about 37 percent for Alegre.

  • Alegria breve (novel by Ferreira)

    Portuguese literature: From monarchy to republic: …novel of social concern with Alegria breve (1965; “Brief Joy”) and explored the evanescent moods of the past and the idea of death in Para sempre (1983; “Forever”).

  • Alegría, Ciro (Peruvian author)

    Ciro Alegría, Peruvian novelist and activist who wrote about the lives of the Peruvian Indians. Educated at the National College of San Juan, Alegría acquired a firsthand knowledge of Indian life in his native province of Huamachuco; this first appeared in his novel La serpiente de oro (1935; The

  • Alegría, Claribel (Nicaraguan Salvadoran author)

    Claribel Alegría, Nicaraguan Salvadoran poet, essayist, and journalist who was a major voice in the literature of contemporary Central America. Noted for her testimonio (testament) concerning the Sandinista revolution in Nicaragua, she was best known in the United States for the bilingual edition

  • alehouse (drinking establishment)

    tavern: These were followed by alehouses, which were run by women (alewives) and marked by a broom stuck out above the door. The English inns of the Middle Ages were sanctuaries of wayfaring strangers, cutthroats, thieves, and political malcontents. The tavern, the predecessor of the modern restaurant, originated the custom…

  • Aleichem, Shalom (Yiddish author)

    Sholem Aleichem, popular author, a humorist noted for his many Yiddish stories of life in the shtetl. He is one of the preeminent classical writers of modern Yiddish literature. Drawn to writing as a youth, he became a private tutor of Russian at age 17. He later served in the Russian provincial

  • Aleichem, Sholem (Yiddish author)

    Sholem Aleichem, popular author, a humorist noted for his many Yiddish stories of life in the shtetl. He is one of the preeminent classical writers of modern Yiddish literature. Drawn to writing as a youth, he became a private tutor of Russian at age 17. He later served in the Russian provincial

  • Aleichem, Sholom (Yiddish author)

    Sholem Aleichem, popular author, a humorist noted for his many Yiddish stories of life in the shtetl. He is one of the preeminent classical writers of modern Yiddish literature. Drawn to writing as a youth, he became a private tutor of Russian at age 17. He later served in the Russian provincial

  • Aleijadinho (Brazilian sculptor and architect)

    Aleijadinho, prolific and influential Brazilian sculptor and architect whose Rococo statuary and religious articles complement the dramatic sobriety of his churches. Aleijadinho, the son of the Portuguese architect Manoel Francisco Lisboa and an African woman, was born with a degenerative disease

  • Aleixandre, Vicente (Spanish poet)

    Vicente Aleixandre, Spanish poet, a member of the Generation of 1927, who received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1977. He was strongly influenced by the Surrealist technique of poetic composition. Aleixandre was the son of a railway engineer. He studied law and business management and from 1920

  • Alejandro Selkirk, Isla (island, South Pacific Ocean)

    Juan Fernández Islands: …Isla Alejandro Selkirk (also called Isla Más Afuera), 100 miles to the west; and an islet, Isla Santa Clara, southwest of Isla Robinson Crusoe.

  • Alekan, Henri (French cinematographer)

    Henri Alekan, French cinematographer (born Feb. 10, 1909, Paris, France—died June 15, 2001, Auxerre, France), was one of the most accomplished filmmakers of the 20th century. After working for a time as a puppeteer, Alekan broke into the film industry as an assistant camera operator in 1927. His c

  • Alekhin, Alexander (Russian-French chess player)

    Alexander Alekhine, world champion chess player from 1927 to 1935 and from 1937 until his death, noted for using a great variety of attacks. Alekhine was a precocious chess player, becoming a master at age 16 and a grandmaster at age 22. He was playing in a tournament in Mannheim, Germany, when

  • Alekhine, Alexander (Russian-French chess player)

    Alexander Alekhine, world champion chess player from 1927 to 1935 and from 1937 until his death, noted for using a great variety of attacks. Alekhine was a precocious chess player, becoming a master at age 16 and a grandmaster at age 22. He was playing in a tournament in Mannheim, Germany, when

  • Aleksandr Aleksandrovich (emperor of Russia)

    Alexander III, emperor of Russia from 1881 to 1894, opponent of representative government, and supporter of Russian nationalism. He adopted programs, based on the concepts of Orthodoxy, autocracy, and narodnost (a belief in the Russian people), that included the Russification of national

  • Aleksandr Nevsky (prince of Russia)

    Saint Alexander Nevsky, ; canonized in Russian Church 1547; feast days November 23, August 30), prince of Novgorod (1236–52) and of Kiev (1246–52) and grand prince of Vladimir (1252–63), who halted the eastward drive of the Germans and Swedes but collaborated with the Mongols in imposing their rule

  • Aleksandr Nikolayevich (emperor of Russia)

    Alexander II, emperor of Russia (1855–81). His liberal education and distress at the outcome of the Crimean War, which had demonstrated Russia’s backwardness, inspired him toward a great program of domestic reforms, the most important being the emancipation (1861) of the serfs. A period of

  • Aleksandr Pavlovich (emperor of Russia)

    Alexander I, emperor of Russia (1801–25), who alternately fought and befriended Napoleon I during the Napoleonic Wars but who ultimately (1813–15) helped form the coalition that defeated the emperor of the French. He took part in the Congress of Vienna (1814–15), drove for the establishment of the

  • Aleksandr Yaroslavich (prince of Russia)

    Saint Alexander Nevsky, ; canonized in Russian Church 1547; feast days November 23, August 30), prince of Novgorod (1236–52) and of Kiev (1246–52) and grand prince of Vladimir (1252–63), who halted the eastward drive of the Germans and Swedes but collaborated with the Mongols in imposing their rule

  • Aleksandra Fyodorovna (empress consort of Russia)

    Alexandra, consort of the Russian emperor Nicholas II. Her misrule while the emperor was commanding the Russian forces during World War I precipitated the collapse of the imperial government in March 1917. A granddaughter of Queen Victoria and daughter of Louis IV, grand duke of Hesse-Darmstadt,

  • Aleksandravi?ius, Jonas (Lithuanian poet)

    Jonas Aistis, poet whose lyrics are considered among the best in Lithuanian literature and who was the first modern Lithuanian poet to turn to personal expression. Aistis studied literature at the University of Kaunas and in 1936 went to France to study French literature at the University of

  • Aleksandriya (Ukraine)

    Oleksandriya, city, south-central Ukraine, on the Inhulets River. Founded as Usivka in the early 18th century, it was renamed Becheyu (also Becha, or Bechka) in the 1750s, Oleksandriysk in 1784, and Oleksandriya shortly thereafter. The nearby lignite (brown coal) field was used beginning in the

  • Aleksandrov, Grigory (Soviet film director)

    history of the motion picture: Postsynchronization: Grigory Aleksandrov denounced synchronous sound in favour of asynchronous, contrapuntal sound—sound that would counterpoint the images it accompanied to become another dynamic element in the montage process. Like the practical editing problem, the theoretical debate over the appropriate use of sound was eventually resolved by…

  • Aleksandrov, Pavel Sergeevich (Soviet mathematician)

    Pavel Sergeevich Aleksandrov, Russian mathematician who made important contributions to topology. In 1897 Aleksandrov moved with his family to Smolensk, where his father had accepted a position as a surgeon with the Smolensk State Hospital. His early education was supplied by his mother, who gave

  • Aleksándrov, Pavel Sergeyevich (Soviet mathematician)

    Pavel Sergeevich Aleksandrov, Russian mathematician who made important contributions to topology. In 1897 Aleksandrov moved with his family to Smolensk, where his father had accepted a position as a surgeon with the Smolensk State Hospital. His early education was supplied by his mother, who gave

  • Aleksandrov, Todor (Macedonian leader)

    Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organization: …pro-Bulgarian wing of IMRO under Todor Aleksandrov assassinated Bulgaria’s prime minister, Aleksand?r Stamboliyski, in 1923. The next year Aleksandrov himself was assassinated, at which time Alexander Protogerov assumed control of the organization, only to be displaced by Ivan Mihailov. The Mihailovists, as they were known, continued to identify closely with…

  • Aleksandrovka (Russia)

    Belogorsk, city, Amur oblast (region), far eastern Russia. Situated in the Zeya-Bureya Plain and on the Tom River, it was founded in 1860 and became a city in 1926. It is a rail junction and an agricultural centre in a wheat-producing area with food-processing industries. Pop. (2005 est.)

  • Aleksandrovsk (Ukraine)

    Zaporizhzhya, city, southeastern Ukraine, on the Dnieper River just below its former rapids. In 1770 the fortress of Oleksandrivsk was established to ensure government control over the Zaporozhian Cossacks, whose headquarters were on nearby Khortytsya (Khortitsa) Island. The settlement became a

  • Aleksandrovsk-Grushevsky (Russia)

    Shakhty, city, Rostov oblast (region), western Russia. It lies along the upper Grushevka River, 47 miles (75 km) northeast of Rostov-na-Donu. Shakhty developed in the early 19th century as a coal-mining centre and became a city in 1881. It is now the main city of the eastern end of the Donets Basin

  • Aleksandrovsk-Sakhalinsky (Russia)

    Aleksandrovsk-Sakhalinsky, city, west-central Sakhalin oblast (region), far-eastern Siberia, Russia. It lies on the western coast of Sakhalin Island on the Tatar Strait. Aleksandrovsk-Sakhalinsky was founded in 1881 as a centre for penal settlements. In 1890 the writer Anton Chekhov lived there

  • Aleksandrovsky (Russia)

    Novosibirsk, city, administrative centre of Novosibirsk oblast (region) and the chief city of western Siberia, in south-central Russia. It lies along the Ob River where the latter is crossed by the Trans-Siberian Railroad. It developed after the village of Krivoshchekovo on the left bank was chosen

  • Alekseev, Mikhail Vasilyevich (Russian general)

    Mikhail Vasilyevich Alekseyev, commander in chief of the Russian Army for two months in World War I and a military and political leader of the White (anti-Bolshevik) forces in the Russian Civil War that followed the Russian Revolution of October 1917. The son of a private soldier, Alekseyev entered

  • Alekseevskoe (settlement, Asia)

    Central Asian arts: Neolithic and Metal Age cultures: The settlement and cemetery of Alekseevskoe (present Tenlyk), some 400 miles (600 kilometres) south of Yekaterinburg (formerly Sverdlovsk), is especially important, because its earth houses were designed for permanent habitation. Their roofs rested on logs, and each dwelling had a central hearth used for heating purposes with side hearths intended…

  • Aleksei I (patriarch of Moscow)

    Alexis I, Russian Orthodox Patriarch of Moscow and All Russia (1945–70) whose allegiance to the Soviet government helped him strengthen the structure of the church within an officially atheistic country. Born to an aristocratic family, Simansky received a law degree from the University of Moscow

  • Aleksei Nikolayevich (prince of Russia [1904–1918])

    Alexis, only son of Nicholas II, the last tsar of Russia, and the tsarina Alexandra. He was the first male heir born to a reigning tsar since the 17th century. Alexis was a hemophiliac, and at that time there was no medical treatment that could alleviate his condition or lessen his vulnerability to

  • Aleksei, Saint (metropolitan of Moscow)

    Saint Alexis, ; canonized 1448; feast day Oct. 5), metropolitan of Moscow from 1354 to 1378 and the first representative of the Russian Orthodox church to take a truly active role in governing Russia. Alexis became regent during the short reign of Ivan the Fair (1353–59), great-great-grandson of

  • Aleksey I (patriarch of Moscow)

    Alexis I, Russian Orthodox Patriarch of Moscow and All Russia (1945–70) whose allegiance to the Soviet government helped him strengthen the structure of the church within an officially atheistic country. Born to an aristocratic family, Simansky received a law degree from the University of Moscow

  • Aleksey II (patriarch of Moscow)

    Aleksey II, Russian Orthodox Patriarch of Moscow and All Russia from 1990 to 2008. Ridiger graduated from Leningrad Theological Academy in 1953 and was consecrated an archbishop in the Russian Orthodox Church in 1964. From 1968 to 1986 he was metropolitan of Tallinn and Estonia; in July 1986 he

  • Aleksey Mikhaylovich (tsar of Russia)

    Alexis, tsar of Russia from 1645 to 1676. The son of Michael, the first Romanov monarch of Russia (reigned 1613–45), Alexis received a superficial education from his tutor Boris Ivanovich Morozov before acceding to the throne at the age of 16. Morozov, who was also Alexis’ brother-in-law, i

  • Aleksey Nikolayevich (prince of Russia [1904–1918])

    Alexis, only son of Nicholas II, the last tsar of Russia, and the tsarina Alexandra. He was the first male heir born to a reigning tsar since the 17th century. Alexis was a hemophiliac, and at that time there was no medical treatment that could alleviate his condition or lessen his vulnerability to

  • Aleksey Petrovich (prince of Russia [1690-1718])

    Alexis, heir to the throne of Russia, who was accused of trying to overthrow his father, Peter I the Great. After his mother, Eudoxia, was forced to enter a convent (1698), Alexis was brought up by his aunts and, after 1702, was educated by the tutor Baron Heinrich von Huyssen. Although he d

  • Aleksey, Saint (metropolitan of Moscow)

    Saint Alexis, ; canonized 1448; feast day Oct. 5), metropolitan of Moscow from 1354 to 1378 and the first representative of the Russian Orthodox church to take a truly active role in governing Russia. Alexis became regent during the short reign of Ivan the Fair (1353–59), great-great-grandson of

  • Aleksey, Saint (metropolitan of Moscow)

    Saint Alexis, ; canonized 1448; feast day Oct. 5), metropolitan of Moscow from 1354 to 1378 and the first representative of the Russian Orthodox church to take a truly active role in governing Russia. Alexis became regent during the short reign of Ivan the Fair (1353–59), great-great-grandson of

  • Alekseyev Circle (Russian dramatic group)

    Konstantin Stanislavsky: Early influences: …his family and called the Alekseyev Circle. Although initially an awkward performer, Stanislavsky obsessively worked on his shortcomings of voice, diction, and body movement. His thoroughness and his preoccupation with all aspects of a production came to distinguish him from other members of the Alekseyev Circle, and he gradually became…

  • Alekseyev, Aleksandr Aleksandrovich (French animator)

    Alexandre Alexe?eff, Russian-born French filmmaker who invented the pinscreen method of animation with his collaborator (later his wife), the animator Claire Parker (1910–81). Alexe?eff spent his childhood near Istanbul and studied at a naval college in St. Petersburg. After the Russian Revolution

  • Alekseyev, Konstantin Sergeyevich (Russian actor and director)

    Konstantin Stanislavsky, Russian actor, director, and producer, founder of the Moscow Art Theatre (opened 1898). He is best known for developing the system or theory of acting called the Stanislavsky system, or Stanislavsky method. Stanislavsky’s father was a manufacturer, and his mother was the

  • Alekseyev, Mikhail Vasilyevich (Russian general)

    Mikhail Vasilyevich Alekseyev, commander in chief of the Russian Army for two months in World War I and a military and political leader of the White (anti-Bolshevik) forces in the Russian Civil War that followed the Russian Revolution of October 1917. The son of a private soldier, Alekseyev entered

  • Alekseyev, Vasily Ivanovich (Soviet weightlifter)

    Vasily Ivanovich Alekseyev, Soviet weightlifter who was arguably the greatest super heavyweight lifter of all time. Between 1970 and 1978 he set 80 world records and won two Olympic gold medals. Alekseyev was the son of a lumberjack. At age 12 he was felling trees and lifting logs for exercise, and

  • Alekseyevna, Yekaterina (empress of Russia)

    Catherine I, peasant woman of Baltic (probably Lithuanian) birth who became the second wife of Peter I the Great (reigned 1682–1725) and empress of Russia (1725–27). Orphaned at the age of three, Marta Skowronska was raised by a Lutheran pastor in Marienburg (modern Alūksne, Latvia). When the R

  • Alekseyevsk (Russia)

    Svobodny, city and centre of Svobodny rayon (sector), Amur oblast (region), southeastern Russia. It is situated on the right bank of the Zeya River, which is a tributary of the Amur River, and on the Trans-Siberian Railroad. Svobodny was founded in 1912. It is now an important transportation

  • Aleksin (Russia)

    Aleksin, city, Tula oblast (province), western Russia, on the Oka River, 40 miles (65 km) northwest of Tula city. Aleksin, first documented in 1236, was at first a fortress, then a river port. The decline of river trade adversely affected the city, but since the October Revolution (1917) it has

  • Alemán Lacayo, Arnoldo

    Nicaragua: Nicaragua from 1990 to 2006: …lost to the AL’s candidate, Arnoldo Alemán Lacayo, a former mayor of Managua and allegedly a sympathizer of former dictator Anastasio Somoza Debayle. During Alemán’s tenure (1997–2002) Nicaragua’s economy enjoyed a modest recovery, fueled by foreign aid, debt forgiveness, and remittances from abroad, but his administration was also beset by…

  • Alemán, Mateo (Spanish author)

    Mateo Alemán, Spanish novelist, a master stylist best known for his early, highly popular picaresque novel, Guzmán de Alfarache. Descended from Jews who had been forcibly converted to Catholicism, Alemán expressed many aspects of the experiences and feelings of the New Christians in 16th-century

  • Alemán, Miguel (president of Mexico)

    Miguel Alemán, president of Mexico from 1946 to 1952. The son of a village shopkeeper, Alemán studied law and set up practice in Mexico City, specializing in labour cases. Appointed senator from Veracruz, he became governor of the state in 1936. In 1940 he resigned to manage the successful

  • Alemanni (people)

    Alemanni, a Germanic people first mentioned in connection with the Roman attack on them in ad 213. In the following decades, their pressure on the Roman provinces became severe; they occupied the Agri Decumates c. 260, and late in the 5th century they expanded into Alsace and northern Switzerland,

  • Alemannic (language)

    German language: Other major dialects: Alemannic dialects, which developed in the southwestern part of the Germanic speech area, differ considerably in sound system and grammar from standard High German. These dialects are spoken in Switzerland, western Austria, Swabia, and Liechtenstein and in the Alsace region of France. Yiddish, the language…

  • Alemanno, Gianni (Italian government official)

    Rome: Capital of a united Italy: …defeated by the right-wing candidate, Gianni Alemanno, known for his past ties to the neofascist movement.

  • Alemany, Raimundo Panikkar (Spanish theologian)

    Raimon Panikkar, (Raimundo Panikkar Alemany), Spanish Roman Catholic theologian (born Nov. 3, 1918, Barcelona, Spain—died Aug. 26, 2010, Tavertet, Spain), was a Jesuit priest and an advocate of interreligious dialogue. Panikkar was the son of an Indian Hindu father and a Catalan Catholic mother. He

  • Alembert, Jean Le Rond d’ (French mathematician and philosopher)

    Jean Le Rond d’Alembert, French mathematician, philosopher, and writer, who achieved fame as a mathematician and scientist before acquiring a considerable reputation as a contributor to and editor of the famous Encyclopédie. The illegitimate son of a famous hostess, Mme de Tencin, and one of her

  • alembic (apparatus)

    Alembic, apparatus for distillation used chiefly by alchemists. It was rendered obsolete and superseded by more convenient forms of stills for both experimental and industrial purposes. It consisted essentially of three parts: a gourdlike vessel containing the material to be distilled, called the

  • Alemtejo (historical province, Portugal)

    Alentejo, region and historical province of south-central Portugal. It lies southeast of the Tagus (Tejo) River and is bounded on the east by the Spanish frontier and on the southwest by the Atlantic Ocean. It is an almost featureless tableland of less than 650 feet (200 m) in elevation in the

  • Alemtuzumab (drug)

    multiple sclerosis: Treatment of multiple sclerosis: Another monoclonal antibody, called Alemtuzumab (Lemtrada), which is used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia, also binds to the cell membrane of lymphocytes but works by stimulating antibody-mediated destruction of the cells. In clinical trials in patients with early-stage RRMS, this agent not only stopped progression of the disease but…

  • Alen, William Van (American architect)

    Chrysler Building: …New York City, designed by William Van Alen and often cited as the epitome of the Art Deco skyscraper. Its sunburst-patterned stainless steel spire remains one of the most striking features of the Manhattan skyline. Built between 1928 and 1930, the Chrysler Building was briefly the tallest in the world,…

  • Alencar, José de (Brazilian author)

    José de Alencar, journalist, novelist, and playwright whose novel O Guarani (1857; “The Guarani Indian”) initiated the vogue of the Brazilian Indianista novel (romantic tales of indigenous life incorporating vocabulary of Amerindian origin referring to flora, fauna, and tribal customs). O Guarani,

  • Alencar, José Martiniano de (Brazilian author)

    José de Alencar, journalist, novelist, and playwright whose novel O Guarani (1857; “The Guarani Indian”) initiated the vogue of the Brazilian Indianista novel (romantic tales of indigenous life incorporating vocabulary of Amerindian origin referring to flora, fauna, and tribal customs). O Guarani,

  • Alen?on (France)

    Alen?on, town, Orne département, Normandy région, northwestern France. Alen?on lies at the juncture of the Sarthe and Briante rivers, in the centre of a plain ringed by wooded hills. It is known for its tulle and lace (especially point d’Alen?on), introduced from Venice in the mid-17th century.

  • Alen?on lace (lace)

    Alen?on lace, needle lace produced in Alen?on in northwestern France. The city of Alen?on was already famous for its cutwork and reticella (see embroidered lace) when in 1665 Louis XIV’s minister Jean-Baptiste Colbert introduced Venetian lacemakers into the area to teach the local women the secrets

  • Alen?on, duc d’ (French duke)

    Fran?ois, duc d’Anjou, fourth and youngest son of Henry II of France and Catherine de Médicis; his three brothers—Francis II, Charles IX, and Henry III—were kings of France. But for his early death at age 30, he too would have been king. Catherine de Médicis gave him Alen?on in 1566, and he bore

  • Alen?on, Jean, duc d’ (French duke)

    St. Joan of Arc: Joan’s mission: …authorities in the presence of Jean, duc d’Alen?on, a relative of Charles, who showed himself well-disposed toward her. She was then taken to Poitiers for three weeks, where she was further questioned by eminent theologians who were allied to the Dauphin’s cause. These examinations, the record of which has not…

  • Aleni, Giulio (Italian priest)

    Giulio Aleni, Jesuit priest who was the first Christian missionary in the province of Kiangsi, China. Aleni entered the Society of Jesus in 1600 and was sent to the Far East. He landed at Macau in 1610 and went to China three years later. During his more than 30 years in China, he adopted that

  • Alentejo (historical province, Portugal)

    Alentejo, region and historical province of south-central Portugal. It lies southeast of the Tagus (Tejo) River and is bounded on the east by the Spanish frontier and on the southwest by the Atlantic Ocean. It is an almost featureless tableland of less than 650 feet (200 m) in elevation in the

  • alentours tapestry (French tapestry style)

    tapestry: 17th and 18th centuries: …designed many of the popular alentours tapestries, in which the central subject, presented as a painting bordered by a frame simulating gilded wood, is eclipsed by the rich use of ornamental devices surrounding it. Boucher’s Loves of the Gods were also alentours and enjoyed a great success and popularity, especially…

  • ?alenu (Judaism)

    ?alenu, (Hebrew: “it is our duty”), the opening word of an extremely old Jewish prayer, which has been recited at the end of the three periods of daily prayer since the European Middle Ages. The first section of the ?alenu is a prayer of thanks for having set Israel apart for the service of God;

  • Aleotti, Giovanni Battista (Italian architect)

    Teatro Farnese: …was begun in 1618 by Giovanni Battista Aleotti for Ranuccio I Farnese, and it officially opened in 1628. At one end of the large, rectangular wooden structure was a stage area designed for deep-perspective scenery and spectacular effects. The stage area, divided in half by two half walls, had provision…

  • Aleph (Japanese new religious movement)

    Aleph, Japanese new religious movement founded in 1987 as AUM Shinrikyo (“AUM Supreme Truth”) by Matsumoto Chizuo, known to his followers as Master Asahara Shoko. The organization came to public attention when it was learned that several of its top leaders had perpetrated the Tokyo subway attack of

  • Aleph and Other Stories, 1933–1969, The (work by Borges)

    Jorge Luis Borges: Life: …volume of English translations titled The Aleph, and Other Stories, 1933–1969 (1970). During this time, he and another writer, Adolfo Bioy Casares, jointly wrote detective stories under the pseudonym H. Bustos Domecq (combining ancestral names of the two writers’ families), which were published in 1942 as Seis problemas para Don…

  • aleph-null (mathematics)

    history of logic: The continuum problem and the axiom of constructibility: …number has the cardinality ?o (aleph-null), which is the cardinality of the set of natural numbers. The cardinality of the set of all sets of natural numbers, called ?1 (aleph-one), is equal to the cardinality of the set of all real numbers. The continuum hypothesis states that ?1 is the…

  • aleph-one (mathematics)

    history of logic: The continuum problem and the axiom of constructibility: …natural numbers, called ?1 (aleph-one), is equal to the cardinality of the set of all real numbers. The continuum hypothesis states that ?1 is the second infinite cardinal—in other words, there does not exist any cardinality strictly between ?o and ?1. Despite its prominence, the problem of the continuum…

  • Alepisauridae

    Lancet fish, either of two species of widely distributed, deepwater marine fish of the genus Alepisaurus (family Alepisauridae). Lancet fish are elongated and slender, with a long, very tall dorsal fin and a large mouth that is equipped with formidable fanglike teeth. The fish grow to a large

  • Alepisaurus brevirostris (fish)

    lancet fish: The shortnose lancet fish (A. brevirostris) inhabits the Atlantic and south Pacific oceans.

  • Alepisaurus ferox

    lancet fish: The longnose lancet fish (A. ferox) is found in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The shortnose lancet fish (A. brevirostris) inhabits the Atlantic and south Pacific oceans.

  • Alepocephalidae (fish)

    Slickhead, any of several deep-sea fishes, family Alepocephalidae (order Salmoniformes), found in almost all oceans at depths up to 5,500 m (17,800 feet) or more. Slickheads are dark, soft, and herringlike; species vary greatly in structure, and a few possess light-producing organs. Some common

  • Alepocephaloidei (fish superfamily)

    protacanthopterygian: Annotated classification: Superfamily Alepocephaloidei About 130 species; 3 to 700 cm (about 1 inch to about 23 feet); marine, deep-sea; worldwide. Adipose fin lacking; swim bladder lacking; teeth small; intestine with pyloric caecae. Light organs present in some species (on raised papillae). Tail supported by 3 vertebral centra.…

  • Alepoudhelis, Odysseus (Greek poet)

    Odysseus Elytis, Greek poet and winner of the 1979 Nobel Prize for Literature. Born the scion of a prosperous family from Lesbos, he abandoned the family name as a young man in order to dissociate his writing from the family soap business. Elytis studied law at Athens University. Intrigued by

  • Aleppo (Syria)

    Aleppo, principal city of northern Syria. It is situated in the northwestern part of the country, about 30 miles (50 km) south of the Turkish border. Aleppo is located at the crossroads of great commercial routes and lies some 60 miles (100 km) from both the Mediterranean Sea (west) and the

  • Aleppo boil (pathology)

    Oriental sore, infectious disease that is a type of leishmaniasis (

  • Aleppo Codex (Hebrew Bible)

    biblical literature: Masoretic texts: …production of the model so-called Aleppo Codex, now in Jerusalem. Written by Solomon ben Buya’a, it was corrected, punctuated, and furnished with a Masoretic apparatus by Aaron ben Moses ben Asher about 930. Originally containing the entire Hebrew Bible in about 380 folios, of which 294 are extant, the Aleppo…

  • Aleppo earthquake of 1138 (Syria)

    Aleppo earthquake of 1138, earthquake, among the deadliest ever recorded, that struck the Syrian city of Aleppo (?alab) on Oct. 11, 1138. The city suffered extensive damage, and it is estimated that 230,000 people were killed. Aleppo is located in northern Syria. The region, which sits on the

  • Aleppo gall (plant disease)

    gallic acid: …the genus Caesalpinia) and in Aleppo and Chinese galls (swellings of plant tissue), from which it is obtained commercially by the action of acids or alkalies. An Aleppo gall has a spherical shape, is hard and brittle, and is about the size of a hickory nut; it is produced on…

  • Aleppo oak (plant)

    oak: …on the twigs of the Aleppo oak (Q. infectoria) are a source of Aleppo tannin, used in ink manufacture; commercial cork is obtained from the bark of the cork oak (Q. suber), and the tannin-rich kermes oak (Q. coccifera) is the host of the kermes insect, once harvested for a…

  • Aleppo, Battle of (Syrian history [1400])

    Battle of Aleppo, (11 November 1400). After the success of his devastating invasion of India, Timur turned his army to the west. His attack on the Syrian domains of Sultan Faraj, Mameluke ruler of Egypt, was an astonishingly bold enterprise. In the event, the renowned Mameluke forces proved no

  • Aleppo, Great Mosque of (mosque, Aleppo, Syria)

    Zangid Dynasty: The most noteworthy is the Great Mosque in Aleppo, completed in 1190. The building, a perfect continuation of the Zangid artistic tradition, demonstrates simplicity in decorative architecture. It is built around a large, open, marble-floored court, with a polychrome mihrab (prayer niche facing Mecca) and a tall, square minaret. Large…

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