You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Agatho, Saint (pope)

    Saint Agatho, ; feast day January 10), pope from 678 to 681. A cleric well-versed in Latin and Greek, he was elected pope in June 678. He judged that St. Wilfrid, bishop of York, had been unjustly deprived and ordered his restoration, and he received the submission of Exarch Theodore of Ravenna,

  • Agathocles (tyrant of Syracuse)

    Agathocles, tyrant of Syracuse, in Sicily, from 317 to c. 304 and self-styled king of Sicily after c. 304. A champion of Hellenism, he waged war unsuccessfully against Carthage. Agathocles moved from his native town to Syracuse about 343 and served with distinction in the army. Twice banished for

  • Agathodaimon (ancient alchemist)

    alchemy: Hellenistic alchemy: …invented the apparatus, and to Agathodaimon, probably a pseudonym. Neither is represented (beyond Zosimos’ references) in the Venice–Paris manuscript, but a tract attributed to Agathodaimon, published in 1953, shows him to be preoccupied with the colour sequence and complicating it by using arsenic instead of sulfur. Thus, the colour-producing potentialities…

  • Agathon (Greek poet)

    Agathon, Athenian tragic poet whose first victory at the festival of the Great Dionysia, in which plays were presented and judged, was gained in 416 bc. The event is made, by Plato, the occasion for his dialogue Symposium, and the banquet, which is the setting of the dialogue, is placed in

  • Agathos Daimon (Greek religion)

    Tyche: …associated with the more beneficent Agathos Daimon, a good spirit, protective of individuals and families, and with Nemesis, who, as an abstraction, represented punishment of overprosperous man and so was believed to act as a moderating influence. She was often shown winged, wearing a crown, and bearing a sceptre and…

  • Agathosma (plant genus)

    Sapindales: Distribution and abundance: Agathosma (135 species) is endemic to South Africa. Boronia (about 100 species) is one of the largest endemic Australian genera. Haplophyllum (about 70 species) occurs from the Mediterranean region to eastern Siberia.

  • Agau (ancient people)

    Agau, an ancient people who settled in the northern and central Ethiopian Plateau and are associated with the development of agriculture and animal husbandry in the area. The term Agau also refers to any of several contemporaneous groups that are either culturally similar or linked by a Cushitic

  • Agau language

    Cushitic languages: …Central Cushitic (also known as Agau [Agaw, Agew]), with languages such as Bilin, Kemant, Kwara, Xamtage, and Awngi; South Cushitic (spoken mainly in Tanzania), including Iraqw, Burunge, and Gorowa, the hybrid language Ma?a/Mbugu, and (in Kenya) Dahalo; Highland East Cushitic, including Burji, Sidamo, Kambata, and Hadiyya; Lowland East Cushitic,

  • Agavaceae (plant subfamily)

    Agavoideae, the agave subfamily of the flowering plant family Asparagaceae (order Asparagales), consisting of 23 genera and 637 species of short-stemmed, often woody plants distributed throughout tropical, subtropical, and temperate areas of the world. Though formerly treated as its own family

  • Agave (plant)

    Agave, (genus Agave), genus of the some 200 species of the family Asparagaceae (formerly Agavaceae), native to arid and semiarid regions of the Americas, particularly Mexico, and the Caribbean. The genus contains a number of economically important species, especially those required for the

  • agave (plant)

    Agave, (genus Agave), genus of the some 200 species of the family Asparagaceae (formerly Agavaceae), native to arid and semiarid regions of the Americas, particularly Mexico, and the Caribbean. The genus contains a number of economically important species, especially those required for the

  • Agave americana (plant species)

    century plant: …name is commonly applied to A. americana, which is grown as an ornamental in many places and is a source of the fibre maguey and of “agave nectar” used as a sweetener. Despite their common name, most century plants do not live longer than 30 years; each rosette of leaves…

  • Agave cantala (plant)

    Cantala, (Agave cantala), plant of the family Asparagaceae and its fibre, belonging to the leaf fibre group. Likely native to Mexico, the plant has been cultivated in the Philippines since 1783 and was growing in Indonesia and India by the early 1800s. Sometimes known as Manila maguey or Cebu

  • Agave fourcroydes (plant)

    Henequen, (Agave fourcroydes), fibre plant of the asparagus family (Asparagaceae), native to Mexico and Guatemala. Henequen fibre is an important leaf fibre and has been used since pre-Columbian times. The plant was introduced to Cuba in the 19th century and became the country’s chief fibre crop by

  • agave nectar (food)

    agave: …source of mescal alcohols and agave nectar. To prepare mescal, the sap of roasted or pressure-cooked agave hearts is fermented and distilled; different species are used for different types of mescal, with blue agave being the only species used for tequila. Similarly, agave nectar, a syrupy sweetener used as a…

  • Agave sisalana (plant species)

    Sisal, (Agave sisalana), plant of the family Asparagaceae and its fibre, the most important of the leaf fibre group. The plant is native to Central America, where its fibre has been used since pre-Columbian times. Commercial interest in sisal was stimulated by the development of the machine grain

  • agave subfamily (plant subfamily)

    Agavoideae, the agave subfamily of the flowering plant family Asparagaceae (order Asparagales), consisting of 23 genera and 637 species of short-stemmed, often woody plants distributed throughout tropical, subtropical, and temperate areas of the world. Though formerly treated as its own family

  • Agave tequilana (plant)

    Agavoideae: Some species of Agave, notably A. tequilana, contain a sap that is fermented to produce alcoholic drinks, including tequila and mescal (mezcal). Many species of the genus Yucca, including Joshua trees (Y. brevifolia) and Spanish daggers (Y. gloriosa), are popular as

  • Agavoideae (plant subfamily)

    Agavoideae, the agave subfamily of the flowering plant family Asparagaceae (order Asparagales), consisting of 23 genera and 637 species of short-stemmed, often woody plants distributed throughout tropical, subtropical, and temperate areas of the world. Though formerly treated as its own family

  • Agaw (ancient people)

    Agau, an ancient people who settled in the northern and central Ethiopian Plateau and are associated with the development of agriculture and animal husbandry in the area. The term Agau also refers to any of several contemporaneous groups that are either culturally similar or linked by a Cushitic

  • Agawam (Massachusetts, United States)

    Ipswich, town (township), Essex county, northeastern Massachusetts, U.S. It lies along the Ipswich River (there bridged since 1764), 28 miles (45 km) north-northeast of Boston. Settled in 1633 as Agawam, it was incorporated in 1634 and renamed for Ipswich, England. Lace making, the town’s first

  • Agazzari, Agostino (Italian composer)

    Agostino Agazzari, Italian composer famous for his treatise, Del sonare sopra ’l basso con tutti li stromenti e dell’uso loro nel conserto (1607; “On Playing Upon the Thoroughbass with All the Instruments and Their Use in an Ensemble”), one of the earliest instruction books for performing from the

  • Agazzi, Carolina (Italian educator)

    preschool education: History: …the Agazzi sisters, Rosa and Carolina, initiated a blending of Aporti’s infant school and Froebel’s kindergarten and produced a prototypical Italian maternal school (scuola materna). In the school the children were induced to become collaborators in the search for the instruments of their own education—seeking realia (objects from real life)…

  • Agazzi, Rosa (Italian educator)

    preschool education: History: In 1892 in Italy, the Agazzi sisters, Rosa and Carolina, initiated a blending of Aporti’s infant school and Froebel’s kindergarten and produced a prototypical Italian maternal school (scuola materna). In the school the children were induced to become collaborators in the search for the instruments of their own education—seeking realia…

  • Agbale, Timi (Yoruba leader)

    Ede: …been founded about 1500 by Timi Agbale, a hunter and warlord sent by Alaafin (Alafin; “King”) Kori of Old Oyo (Katunga), capital of the Oyo empire, to establish a settlement to protect the Oyo caravan route to Benin (127 miles [204 km] to the southeast). Ede is a local trading…

  • Agbatana (ancient city, Iran)

    Ecbatana, ancient city on the site of which stands the modern city of Hamadān (q.v.), Iran. Ecbatana was the capital of Media and was subsequently the summer residence of the Achaemenian kings and one of the residences of the Parthian kings. According to ancient Greek writers, the city was founded

  • Agca, Mehmet Ali (Turkish assassin)

    St. John Paul II: Political and cultural messages: …by a 23-year-old Turkish man, Mehmet Ali Agca. Meanwhile, the Poles’ other spiritual leader, Primate Cardinal Wyszyński, lay dying of cancer. The sudden prospect of losing both men unsettled the Solidarity movement. Although no conspiracy in the assassination attempt was ever proved in court, the widespread suspicion that the Soviets…

  • AGCM (climatology)

    scientific modeling: …model of note is the general circulation model, which is used for simulating human- and non-human-induced climate change. Modeling of geologic events, such as convection within Earth and theoretical movements of Earth’s plates, has advanced scientists’ knowledge of volcanoes and earthquakes and of the evolution of Earth’s surface. In ecology,…

  • Agdistis (ancient deity)

    Great Mother of the Gods, ancient Oriental and Greco-Roman deity, known by a variety of local names; the name Cybele or Cybebe predominates in Greek and Roman literature from about the 5th century bc onward. Her full official Roman name was Mater Deum Magna Idaea (Great Idaean Mother of the Gods).

  • age (time measurement)

    Christianity: The ages of the world: By the time the New Testament was written, Jewish apocalyptic writings (symbolic or cryptographic literature portraying God’s dramatic intervention in history and catastrophic dramas at the end of a cosmic epoch) had already produced theories of history that reworked Indo-Iranian notions…

  • age (law)

    family law: Age: In order to satisfy the requirement of a voluntary consent to a marriage, a party must have reached an age at which he or she is able to give meaningful consent, and it is also implied that a person may be legally disqualified on…

  • age (physiology and sociology)

    Human aging, physiological changes that take place in the human body leading to senescence, the decline of biological functions and of the ability to adapt to metabolic stress. In humans the physiological developments are normally accompanied by psychological and behavioral changes, and other

  • age (geologic time)
  • age (life process)

    Aging, progressive physiological changes in an organism that lead to senescence, or a decline of biological functions and of the organism’s ability to adapt to metabolic stress. Aging takes place in a cell, an organ, or the total organism with the passage of time. It is a process that goes on over

  • age composition (demography)

    Age distribution, in population studies, the proportionate numbers of persons in successive age categories in a given population. Age distributions differ among countries mainly because of differences in the levels and trends of fertility. A population with persistently high fertility, for i

  • Age d’homme, L’? (work by Leiris)

    Michel Leiris: …the autobiographical L’?ge d’homme (Manhood), which attracted much attention and was reissued in 1946. Self-deprecating and punitive, the work catalogs Leiris’ physical and moral flaws; he introduced the 1946 edition with an essay, “De la littérature considérée comme une tauromachie” (1946; The Autobiographer as Torero), comparing the courage required…

  • Age d’or, L’ (film by Bu?uel and Dalí [1930])

    Luis Bu?uel: Life and work: …second film, L’Age d’or (1930; The Golden Age), an assault on the repression of sex by organized religion. In one of its most-controversial scenes, Christ is seen leaving an orgy orchestrated by the Marquis de Sade. Before its release, MGM put both Bu?uel and the film’s star, Lya Lys, under…

  • ?ge des ténèbres, L’? (film by Arcand [2007])

    Denys Arcand: …comedy L’?ge des ténèbres (2007; Days of Darkness), in which he also acted; Le Règne de la beauté (2014; An Eye for Beauty), about a married architect who has an affair; and La Chute de l’empire américain (2018; The Fall of the American Empire), a satiric crime thriller that explores…

  • age determination (geochronology)

    dating: Absolute dating: Although relative ages can generally be established on a local scale, the events recorded in rocks from different locations can be integrated into a picture of regional or global scale only if their sequence in time is firmly established. The time that has…

  • age differentiation

    history of Europe: The Bronze Age: …than contracted, and sex and age were not expressed by body position but were reflected through elements such as grave goods or location within the cemetery.

  • age discrimination (law)

    Kimel v. Florida Board of Regents: …the age of 40 from age discrimination by private employers, and the 1974 amendment extended the same protections to workers employed by the states. Although the Eleventh Amendment gives states sovereign immunity from lawsuits, this immunity is not absolute. For instance, when exercising its power to enforce the Fourteenth Amendment,…

  • Age Discrimination in Employment Act (United States [1967])

    Kimel v. Florida Board of Regents: …a 1974 amendment to the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) of 1967 that abrogated the general immunity of states under the Eleventh Amendment to lawsuits by individuals to permit such actions against states and state agencies that violated the statute. The original ADEA was a federal law that protected…

  • age distribution (demography)

    Age distribution, in population studies, the proportionate numbers of persons in successive age categories in a given population. Age distributions differ among countries mainly because of differences in the levels and trends of fertility. A population with persistently high fertility, for i

  • age grade (sociology)

    age set: …is usually known as an age grade.

  • Age of Anxiety, The (poetry by Auden)

    The Age of Anxiety, poem by W.H. Auden, published in 1947. Described as a “baroque eclogue,” the poem was the last of Auden’s long poems; it won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1948. The poem highlights human isolation, a condition magnified by the lack of tradition or religious belief in the

  • Age of Assassins (work by Soupault)

    Philippe Soupault: Le Temps des assassins (1945; Age of Assassins), a memoir, details Soupault’s six-month imprisonment by the Vichy government in Tunis, Tunisia, where he worked as a journalist and as director of Radio Tunis. A second autobiography, Mémoires de l’oubli (“Memoirs of Oblivion”), was published in 1981. Soupault also wrote a…

  • Age of Bronze, The (work by Rodin)

    Auguste Rodin: Early life and work: …was exhibited in 1877 as The Age of Bronze. The realism of the work contrasted so greatly with the statues of Rodin’s contemporaries that he was accused of having formed its mold upon a living person.

  • age of consent (law)

    family law: Age: In order to satisfy the requirement of a voluntary consent to a marriage, a party must have reached an age at which he or she is able to give meaningful consent, and it is also implied that a person may be legally disqualified on…

  • Age of Consent Act of 1891 (British-Indian legislation)

    India: Social policy: …1856 to the crown’s timid Age of Consent Act of 1891, which merely raised the age of statutory rape for “consenting” Indian brides from 10 years to 12.

  • Age of Constantine the Great, The (work by Burckhardt)

    Jacob Burckhardt: Works: …Zeit Konstantins des Grossen (1853; The Age of Constantine the Great, 1949) Burckhardt presented a picture of a transitional age, unhealthy and immoral but teeming with religious and cultural activity. While he recognized that the rise of Christianity was inevitable and that it was necessary for the development of an…

  • Age of Empires (computer game franchise)

    Age of Empires, computer game franchise designed by Ensemble Studios, an American company founded in 1995 and subsequently acquired by Microsoft Corporation. The original Age of Empires debuted in 1997 to critical acclaim and helped set the bar for the real-time strategy game genre, combining

  • Age of Empires: Castle Seige (computer game)

    Age of Empires: Age of Empires: Castle Siege, a loose adaptation of the classic game, was released for the mobile-device market in 2014.

  • Age of Fishes (geochronology)

    Devonian Period, in geologic time, an interval of the Paleozoic Era that follows the Silurian Period and precedes the Carboniferous Period, spanning between about 419.2 million and 358.9 million years ago. The Devonian Period is sometimes called the “Age of Fishes” because of the diverse, abundant,

  • Age of Heroes, The (work by Yi)

    Yi Muny?l: In Y?ngung sidae (1984; The Age of Heroes), Yi imaginatively reconstructed what he imagined his father’s life might have been like after his defection to communist North Korea. In each of the 16 short stories making up K?dae tasbi n?n kohyang e kaji mot’ari (1980; You Can’t Go Home…

  • Age of Innocence, The (novel by Wharton)

    The Age of Innocence, novel by Edith Wharton, published in 1920. The work presents a picture of upper-class New York society in the late 19th century. The story is presented as a kind of anthropological study of this society through references to the families and their activities as tribal. Winner

  • Age of Innocence, The (film by Scorsese [1993])

    Martin Scorsese: Films of the 1990s: GoodFellas, Cape Fear, and Casino: >The Age of Innocence. A lovingly rendered, subtly acerbic portrait of New York City’s upper crust in the late 19th century, the film revolves around the unconsummated love affair between sensitive lawyer Newland Archer (Daniel Day-Lewis) and Countess Ellen Olenska (Michelle Pfeiffer), whose separation from…

  • Age of Intelligent Machines, The (work by Kurzweil)

    Ray Kurzweil: …array of prescient theories in The Age of Intelligent Machines (1990), which anticipated the explosion in popularity of the Internet. Kurzweil also wrote The 10% Solution for a Healthy Life (1993), which details a diet that he had used to help cure himself of diabetes. His book The Age of…

  • Age of Iron (novel by Coetzee)

    J.M. Coetzee: In Age of Iron (1990) Coetzee dealt directly with circumstances in contemporary South Africa, but in The Master of Petersburg (1994) he made reference to 19th-century Russia (particularly to Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s work The Devils); both books treat the subject of literature in society. In 1999, with…

  • Age of Jackson, The (work by Schlesinger)

    Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.: In 1946 his Pulitzer Prize-winning The Age of Jackson was published to widespread acclaim. In this book Schlesinger reinterpreted the American era of Jacksonian democracy in terms of its cultural, social, and economic aspects as well as its strictly political dimensions. Schlesinger’s major historical work was The Age of Roosevelt,…

  • Age of Louis XIV, The (work by Voltaire)

    Voltaire: Life with Mme du Chatelet: He began Le Siècle de Louis XIV, sketched out a universal history of kings, wars, civilization and manners that became the Essai sur les moeurs, and plunged into biblical exegesis. Mme du Chatelet herself wrote an Examen, highly critical of the two Testaments. It was at Cirey…

  • Age of Magic, The (novel by Okri)

    Ben Okri: …In Arcadia (2002); Starbook (2007); The Age of Magic (2014); and The Freedom Artist (2019). An African Elegy (1992) is a collection of poems that urges Africans to overcome the forces of chaos within their countries, and Mental Flight (1999) is a long poem. Other collections of poetry included Wild…

  • Age of Reason (work by Paine)

    Thomas Paine: In Europe: Rights of Man: …the first part of Paine’s Age of Reason was published (1794), and it was followed by Part II after his release (1796). Although Paine made it clear that he believed in a Supreme Being and, as a Deist, opposed only organized religion, the work won him a reputation as an…

  • Age of Roosevelt, The (work by Schlesinger)

    Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.: Schlesinger’s major historical work was The Age of Roosevelt, whose three separate volumes were entitled The Crisis of the Old Order, 1919–1933 (1957), The Coming of the New Deal (1958), and The Politics of Upheaval (1960). In these books he described and narrated President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal from…

  • Age of Spiritual Machines, The (work by Kurzweil)

    Ray Kurzweil: His book The Age of Spiritual Machines (1999) presents a vision of the 21st century as a time when computer technology would have advanced far enough to allow machines to operate on a level equivalent to that of the human brain. Computers, he predicted, would make complex…

  • Age of the Princes (Ethiopian history)

    Ethiopia: Challenge, revival, and decline (16th–19th century): The Zamana Masafent (“Age of the Princes”; 1769–1855), an era of feudal anarchy, had commenced.

  • Age of the Pussyfoot, The (novel by Pohl)

    Frederik Pohl: Pohl’s other novels include The Age of the Pussyfoot (1969); the Nebula Award-winning Man Plus (1976); Gateway (1977), which won both the Hugo and the Nebula Award for best novel; Jem (1980), the first and only novel to capture a National Book Award for science fiction (hardcover), bestowed only…

  • age set (sociology)

    Age set, a formally organized group consisting of every male (or female) of comparable age. In those societies chiefly identified with the practice, a person belonged, either from birth or from a determined age, to a named age set that passed through a series of stages, each of which had a

  • Age, The (Australian newspaper)

    The Age, Australian daily newspaper published in Melbourne and widely considered to provide some of the finest news coverage in the country. It has been highly regarded for its dedication to accuracy. Originally established as an eight-page weekly in 1854 by the brothers John and Henry Cooke, it

  • age-area hypothesis (anthropology)

    Age-area hypothesis, in anthropology, theory holding that the age of culture traits (elements of a culture) may be determined by examining their distribution over a large geographic area. The hypothesis states that widely distributed traits are older than those more narrowly distributed. It is

  • age-earnings profile (economics)

    wage and salary: Human-capital theory: …investments therefore affect one’s “age-earnings profile,” the trajectory of earnings over one’s lifetime. Those who leave school early, for example, earn market wages for more years on average than those who take advantage of extended schooling, but those in the latter group typically earn higher wages over their lifetimes.…

  • age-related macular degeneration (pathology)

    macular degeneration: Age-related macular degeneration: The most common form of macular degeneration is age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and the incidence of this disease increases dramatically with age, affecting approximately 14 percent of those over age 80. AMD is the most common cause of vision loss in the…

  • age-specific death rate (gerontology)

    aging: …the survivorship curve and the age-specific death rate, or Gompertz function. The relation of such factors as aging characteristics, constitutional vigour, physical factors, diet, and exposure to disease-causing organisms to the actuarial functions is complex. There is, nevertheless, no substitute for them as measures of the aging process and of…

  • agechi (Japanese history)

    Japan: The Tempō reforms: …also promulgated a land-requisition (agechi) order to bring daimyo and hatamoto domains surrounding Edo and ōsaka under direct bakufu control: the stated object of this was the defense of Edo, but it also was designed to supplement the finances of the bakufu. The agechi order was finally withdrawn, however,…

  • aged, the

    Old age, in human beings, the final stage of the normal life span. Definitions of old age are not consistent from the standpoints of biology, demography (conditions of mortality and morbidity), employment and retirement, and sociology. For statistical and public administrative purposes, however,

  • Agee, James (American author)

    James Agee, American poet, novelist, and writer for and about motion pictures. One of the most influential American film critics in the 1930s and ’40s, he applied rigorous intellectual and aesthetic standards to his reviews, which appeared anonymously in Time and signed in The Nation. Agee grew up

  • Agee, Philip Burnett Franklin (American government official)

    Philip Burnett Franklin Agee, American government official (born July 19, 1935, Tacoma Park, Fla.—died Jan. 7, 2008, Havana, Cuba), was stripped of his U.S. citizenship (1979) and marked as an international pariah after publishing Inside the Company: A CIA Diary (1975), which divulged his growing

  • Agee, Tommie Lee (American baseball player)

    Tommie Lee Agee, American baseball player (born Aug. 9, 1942, Mobile, Ala.—died Jan. 22, 2001, New York, N.Y.), helped lead the New York Mets to a World Series championship in 1969. Agee was the centre fielder for the so-called Miracle Mets during the team’s surprising run to the title following y

  • ageing (life process)

    Aging, progressive physiological changes in an organism that lead to senescence, or a decline of biological functions and of the organism’s ability to adapt to metabolic stress. Aging takes place in a cell, an organ, or the total organism with the passage of time. It is a process that goes on over

  • Ageladas (Greek sculptor)

    Ageladas, Greek sculptor said to have been the teacher of Myron, Phidias, and Polyclitus. This tradition testifies to his wide fame but is historically

  • Agelaius phoeniceus (bird)

    animal social behaviour: Social interactions involving sex: Some examples include the red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) and house wren (Troglodytes aedon) in North America and the great reed warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) in Europe. In a few polygamous species, however, females mate with and accept care from multiple partners, a phenomenon referred to as polyandry, examples of which…

  • Agelena naevia (spider)

    funnel weaver: Agelena naevia, a common North American species, varies greatly in size and colour. The body of the male may be up to 8 millimetres (about 13 inch) long; the female grows to about 19 millimetres (about 34 inch). Two wide, dark stripes often extend the…

  • agelenid (spider)

    Funnel weaver, any of certain members of the spider family Agelenidae (order Araneida). Agelenids are notable for their funnel-shaped webs; they are a common group with many species that are distributed worldwide. The webs are built in the grass, under boards and rocks, and among debris. Agelena

  • Agelenidae (spider)

    Funnel weaver, any of certain members of the spider family Agelenidae (order Araneida). Agelenids are notable for their funnel-shaped webs; they are a common group with many species that are distributed worldwide. The webs are built in the grass, under boards and rocks, and among debris. Agelena

  • Agen (France)

    Agen, town, capital of Lot-et-Garonne département, Aquitaine-Limousin-Poitou région, southwestern France. It lies along the Garonne River at the foot of Ermitage Hill (530 feet [162 metres]), northwest of Toulouse. Mentioned by Julius Caesar as Aginnum, capital of the Nitiobriges people, it was

  • Agena (American rocket)

    Atlas: The combined Atlas-Agena rocket, featuring an Atlas booster coupled with an Agena upper stage, was used for launching lunar and planetary probes as well as Earth-orbiting satellites, such as Seasat, where the Agena stage was also the spacecraft. The Atlas-Centaur rocket combined an Atlas first stage, which…

  • Agena (star)

    Beta Centauri, second brightest star (after Alpha Centauri) in the southern constellation Centaurus and the 10th brightest star in the sky. Beta Centauri is about 390 light-years from Earth. It is a system of three B-type stars. The two brightest stars orbit each other every 357 days and form a

  • Agenais (historical region, France)

    Agenais, former province of France, of which Agen was the centre and to which the modern département of Lot-et-Garonne nearly corresponds. In ancient Gaul, Agenais was the country of the Nitiobriges, then a Gallo-Roman civitas, whose limits became those of the diocese of Agen. Having in general

  • Agence France-Presse (French news agency)

    Agence France-Presse (AFP), French cooperative news agency, one of the world’s great wire news services. It is based in Paris, where it was founded under its current name in 1944, but its roots go to the Bureau Havas, which was created in 1832 by Charles-Louis Havas, who translated reports from

  • Agence Havas (French news agency)

    Agence France-Presse: …the Bureau Havas became the Agence Havas, the world’s first true news agency. Stressing rapid transmission of the news, Agence Havas established the first telegraph service in France in 1845. Between 1852 and 1919 the agency worked in close collaboration with an advertising firm, the Correspondance General Havas. Staff correspondents…

  • Agence spatiale canadienne (Canadian government organization)

    Canadian Space Agency (CSA), Canadian government organization founded in 1989 that coordinates spaceflight activities. Its headquarters are in Longueuil, Que. The chief executive of the CSA is the president, who is assisted by a senior vice president and the directors of four branches: Space

  • Agence Spatiale Européenne (European research organization)

    European Space Agency (ESA), European space and space-technology research organization founded in 1975 from the merger of the European Launcher Development Organisation (ELDO) and the European Space Research Organisation (ESRO), both established in 1964. Members include Austria, Belgium, the Czech

  • agency (political science)

    Agency, the property or capacity of actors to make things happen. The concept of agency is central to political theory. Political activities are carried out by agents, whose agency inheres in their power to produce effects. In politics, agency is generally reserved for human actors, and, more

  • agency (law)

    Agency, in law, the relationship that exists when one person or party (the principal) engages another (the agent) to act for him—e.g., to do his work, to sell his goods, to manage his business. The law of agency thus governs the legal relationship in which the agent deals with a third party on

  • agency (philosophy)

    philosophical feminism: Feminist theories of agency: Both feminist social and political philosophy and feminist ethics presuppose a theory of women’s agency—i.e., an account of their capacity for individualized choice and action. The question of women’s agency was salient for feminist philosophers because women’s identities took shape in settings that were…

  • agency (independent administrative authority)

    Agency, an independent administrative authority that participates in running specific parts of an economy or society. Agencies undertake analysis and make decisions to regulate economic and social issues for which steering by the “invisible hand” of the market is judged to be either ineffective or

  • Agency for National Security Planning (government organization, South Korea)

    intelligence: South Korea: The agency, renamed the National Intelligence Service in 1999, collects and coordinates national security intelligence. The Defense Security Command of the Ministry of National Defense and the National Intelligence Service are responsible for the collection of national security intelligence, particularly with regard to the threat from North Korea. The…

  • agency law (law)

    Agency, in law, the relationship that exists when one person or party (the principal) engages another (the agent) to act for him—e.g., to do his work, to sell his goods, to manage his business. The law of agency thus governs the legal relationship in which the agent deals with a third party on

  • agency shop (labour)

    Agency shop, place of employment where union members pay union dues and other workers pay service fees to the union to cover the cost of collective bargaining. An agency shop agreement allows the employer to hire both union and nonunion workers without harming the trade union; the practice is

  • agency theory

    hierarchy: Conceptions of hierarchy: Agency theory, for example, focuses on the problems that accrue from the delegation of decision-making authority to an agent by a principal. Also at issue is the span of control—the number of subordinates directly supervised by a superior. A narrower span will render a direct…

  • agency theory, financial (economics)

    Financial agency theory, in organizational economics, a means of assessing the work being done for a principal (i.e., an employer) by an agent (i.e., an employee). While consistent with the concept of agency traditionally advanced by legal scholars and attorneys, the economic variants of agency

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
港台一级毛片免费观看