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  • Azcapotzalco (Mexico)

    Atzcapotzalco, delegación (administrative subdivision), northwestern Federal District, central Mexico. Situated approximately 7,350 feet (2,240 metres) above sea level in the Valley of Mexico, it was founded in the 12th century and given the Aztec name meaning “anthill” because of its large

  • Azcárraga Milmo, Emilio (Mexican businessman)

    Emilio Azcárraga Milmo, Mexican billionaire who created the Spanish-speaking world’s largest media empire by building up his family’s radio and television network; his fortune was estimated at $2 billion (b. Sept. 6, 1930--d. April 16, 1

  • Azcona del Hoyo, José Simón (president of Honduras)

    José Simón Azcona del Hoyo, Honduran politician (born Jan. 26, 1927, La Ceiba, Honduras—died Oct. 24, 2005, Tegucigalpa, Honduras), served as the country’s president from 1986 to 1990. Azcona, owner of a construction company, became active in the Liberal Party because of his concerns regarding m

  • Azcona, Rafael (Spanish novelist and screenwriter)

    Rafael Azcona, Spanish novelist and screenwriter (born Oct. 24, 1926, Logro?o, Spain—died March 24, 2008, Madrid, Spain), penned some 100 screenplays, notably for La Grande Bouffe (1973) and Belle Epoque (1992), which won the Academy Award for best foreign-language film. Many of Azcano’s

  • Azef, Yevno (Russian revolutionary)

    Russia: The revolution of 1905–06: …when it was disclosed that Yevno Azef, longtime head of the terrorist wing of the Socialist Revolutionary Party, was also an employee of the department of police and had for years been both betraying his revolutionary colleagues and organizing the murders of his official superiors.

  • Azeglio, Massimo Taparelli, marchese d’ (Italian author and statesman)

    Massimo Taparelli, marquis d’Azeglio, aristocrat, painter, author, and statesman who was a leader of the movement that advocated an Italian national revival (Risorgimento) by the expulsion of all foreign influences from the then-divided Italian states. His political influence far outweighed his

  • azekura-zukuri (Japanese architecture)

    Japanese art: Decorative arts: …style of construction known as azekura-zukuri. It houses an accumulation of imperial objects as well as gifts received at the dedication of the Great Buddha and later donated by Emperor Shōmu’s consort, Empress Kōmyō. Additional articles were added to the collection in the middle of the Heian period (794–1185). The…

  • azeotrope (chemistry)

    Azeotrope, in chemistry, a mixture of liquids that has a constant boiling point because the vapour has the same composition as the liquid mixture. The boiling point of an azeotropic mixture may be higher or lower than that of any of its components. The components of the solution cannot be separated

  • azeotropic mixture (chemistry)

    Azeotrope, in chemistry, a mixture of liquids that has a constant boiling point because the vapour has the same composition as the liquid mixture. The boiling point of an azeotropic mixture may be higher or lower than that of any of its components. The components of the solution cannot be separated

  • azepine (chemical compound)

    heterocyclic compound: Rings with seven or more members: …seven-membered ring compounds, one-heteroatom heterocycles—azepines, oxepines, and thiepines—and their derivatives are the most comprehensively studied.

  • Azerbaidzhan

    Azerbaijan, country of eastern Transcaucasia. Occupying an area that fringes the southern flanks of the Caucasus Mountains, it is bounded on the north by Russia, on the east by the Caspian Sea, on the south by Iran, on the west by Armenia, and on the northwest by Georgia. The exclave of Nax??van

  • Azerbaijan

    Azerbaijan, country of eastern Transcaucasia. Occupying an area that fringes the southern flanks of the Caucasus Mountains, it is bounded on the north by Russia, on the east by the Caspian Sea, on the south by Iran, on the west by Armenia, and on the northwest by Georgia. The exclave of Nax??van

  • Azerbaijan (region, Iran)

    Azerbaijan, geographic region that comprises the extreme northwestern portion of Iran. It is bounded on the north by the Aras River, which separates it from independent Azerbaijan and Armenia; on the east by the Iranian region of Gīlān and the Caspian Sea; on the south by the Iranian regions of

  • Azerbaijan Popular Front (political party, Azerbaijan)

    Azerbaijan: Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, dissolution of the Soviet Union, and presidency of Heydar Aliyev: In May 1992 the Azerbaijan Popular Front overthrew Mutalibov and forced new elections, in which its candidate, Abulfez Elchibey, emerged victorious on a platform of separating from the Commonwealth of Independent States and maintaining control over Nagorno-Karabakh. Elchibey was himself overthrown in June 1993 by Heydar Aliyev, a former…

  • Azerbaijan, flag of

    horizontally striped light blue, red, and green national flag with a central crescent and star. Its width-to-length proportion is 1 to 2.Prior to the Russian Revolution, when Azerbaijan was part of the tsar’s domain, the leading Azerbaijani nationalist, ?Alī bay Huseynzada, exhorted his followers

  • Azerbaijan, history of

    Azerbaijan: History: In ancient and early medieval times, eastern Transcaucasia was populated by Iranian speakers, nomadic Turkic tribes, Kurds, and the Caucasian Albanians, who converted to Christianity in the 4th century and came under the cultural influence of the Armenians. After Arab incursions in the 7th…

  • Azerbaijani (people)

    Azerbaijani, any member of a Turkic people living chiefly in the Republic of Azerbaijan and in the region of Azerbaijan in northwestern Iran. At the turn of the 21st century there were some 7.5 million Azerbaijani in the republic and neighbouring areas and more than 15 million in Iran. They are

  • Azerbaijani language

    Turkic languages: Literary languages: …includes Middle and Late Ottoman, Azerbaijani, Late Chagatai, and others. Ottoman is the leading language, with a rich literature comprising a variety of forms and styles. Azerbaijani reached a high level of development in the 16th century. Chagatai continued to play a major role, mixing with local elements in, for…

  • Azerbaijani Republic

    Azerbaijan, country of eastern Transcaucasia. Occupying an area that fringes the southern flanks of the Caucasus Mountains, it is bounded on the north by Russia, on the east by the Caspian Sea, on the south by Iran, on the west by Armenia, and on the northwest by Georgia. The exclave of Nax??van

  • Azerbaydzhan

    Azerbaijan, country of eastern Transcaucasia. Occupying an area that fringes the southern flanks of the Caucasus Mountains, it is bounded on the north by Russia, on the east by the Caspian Sea, on the south by Iran, on the west by Armenia, and on the northwest by Georgia. The exclave of Nax??van

  • Azeri (people)

    Azerbaijani, any member of a Turkic people living chiefly in the Republic of Azerbaijan and in the region of Azerbaijan in northwestern Iran. At the turn of the 21st century there were some 7.5 million Azerbaijani in the republic and neighbouring areas and more than 15 million in Iran. They are

  • Azeri language

    Turkic languages: Literary languages: …includes Middle and Late Ottoman, Azerbaijani, Late Chagatai, and others. Ottoman is the leading language, with a rich literature comprising a variety of forms and styles. Azerbaijani reached a high level of development in the 16th century. Chagatai continued to play a major role, mixing with local elements in, for…

  • azetidine (chemical compound)

    heterocyclic compound: Four-membered rings: Azetidine, oxetane, and thietane—four-membered rings containing, respectively, one nitrogen, oxygen, or sulfur atom—are prepared by nucleophilic displacement reactions similar to those used to prepare the corresponding three-membered rings.

  • Azevedo, Aluízio (Brazilian novelist)

    Aluízio Azevedo, novelist who set the pattern for the naturalistic novel in Brazil and whose work anticipated later novels of social protest. Azevedo studied at the school of fine arts of Rio de Janeiro and became a journalist. His works, modeled on the naturalistic novels of émile Zola and imbued

  • Azhar Mosque, al- (mosque, Cairo, Egypt)

    Islamic arts: Architecture: great Fā?imid mosques of Cairo—Al-Azhar (started in 970) and Al-?ākim (c. 1002–03)—were designed in the traditional hypostyle plan with axial cupolas. It is only in such architectural details as the elaborately composed facade of Al-?ākim, with its corner towers and vaulted portal, that innovations appear, for most earlier mosques…

  • Azhar University, al- (university, Cairo, Egypt)

    Al-Azhar University, chief centre of Islamic and Arabic learning in the world, centred on the mosque of that name in the medieval quarter of Cairo, Egypt. It was founded by the Shī?ite (specifically, the Ismā?īlī sect) Fā?imids in 970 ce and was formally organized by 988. Its name may allude to

  • Azharī, Ismā?īl al- (prime minister of The Sudan)

    Ismā?īl al-Azharī, Sudanese statesman, who was instrumental in achieving his country’s independence and served as prime minister in 1954–56. Educated at Gordon Memorial College at Khartoum and at the American University of Beirut, al-Azharī became president of the Graduates’ General Congress in

  • Azhi Dahaka (Iranian mythology)

    ancient Iranian religion: Creation of the cosmos: …by a serpentine tyrant named Azhi Dahāka (“Dahāka the Snake”), whose rule ushers in a period of drought, ruin, and chaos. In turn, Azhi Dahāka is defeated by the hero Thraitauna, who establishes the legendary line of kings called kavis.

  • Azhvar (Hindu mystics)

    Alvar, any of a group of South Indian mystics who from the 7th to the 10th century wandered from temple to temple singing ecstatic hymns in adoration of the god Vishnu. Their counterpart among the followers of the god Shiva were the Nayanars. The name Alvar means, in the Tamil language in which

  • azide (chemical compound)

    Azide, any of a class of chemical compounds containing three nitrogen atoms as a group, represented as (-N3). Azides are considered as derived from hydrazoic acid (HN3), an inorganic salt such as sodium azide (NaN3), or an organic derivative in which the hydrogen atom of hydrazoic acid is replaced

  • Azīdī (religious sect)

    Yazīdī, member of a Kurdish religious minority found primarily in northern Iraq, southeastern Turkey, northern Syria, the Caucasus region, and parts of Iran. The Yazīdī religion includes elements of ancient Iranian religions as well as elements of Judaism, Nestorian Christianity, and Islam.

  • azidothymidine (drug)

    AZT, drug used to delay development of AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) in patients infected with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus). AZT belongs to a group of drugs known as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). In 1987 AZT became the first of these drugs to be approved by

  • Azienda Autonoma delle Ferrovie dello Stato (Italian railway)

    Ferrovie dello Stato (FS), largest railway system of Italy. FS operates lines on the mainland and also on the islands of Sicily and Sardinia, which are linked to the mainland by train ferries. The Italian railway system was nationalized in 1905. In 1986 its status was changed from a government

  • Azienda Generale Italiana Petroli (Italian corporation)

    Italy: Industrial growth: The petroleum company AGIP (Azienda Generale Italiana Petroli), which became a division of ENI in 1953, discovered natural gas in the Po valley and sold it at low prices to industry. Labour was inexpensive, as rural migrants flooded into the cities, trade unions were weak and politically divided until…

  • Azienda Nazionale Autonoma delle Strade Statali (Italian corporation)

    Italy: Public and private sectors: Other principal agencies include the Azienda Nazionale Autonoma delle Strade Statali (ANAS), responsible for some 190,000 miles (350,000 km) of the road network, and the Ente Ferrovie dello Stato (FS; “State Railways”), which controls the majority of the rail network.

  • Azifet, El- (Tunisian musical group)

    Tunisia: Cultural institutions: Tunisians are especially proud of El-Azifet, an exclusively female ensemble inspired by traditional malouf and mouachah (muwashsha?) music and traditional musicians such as Anouar Brahem.

  • Azikiwe, Benjamin (president of Nigeria)

    Nnamdi Azikiwe, first president of independent Nigeria (1963–66) and prominent nationalist figure. Azikiwe attended various primary and secondary mission schools in Onitsha, Calabar, and Lagos. He arrived in the United States in 1925, where he attended several schools. Azikiwe earned multiple

  • Azikiwe, Nnamdi (president of Nigeria)

    Nnamdi Azikiwe, first president of independent Nigeria (1963–66) and prominent nationalist figure. Azikiwe attended various primary and secondary mission schools in Onitsha, Calabar, and Lagos. He arrived in the United States in 1925, where he attended several schools. Azikiwe earned multiple

  • Azikiwe, Zik (president of Nigeria)

    Nnamdi Azikiwe, first president of independent Nigeria (1963–66) and prominent nationalist figure. Azikiwe attended various primary and secondary mission schools in Onitsha, Calabar, and Lagos. He arrived in the United States in 1925, where he attended several schools. Azikiwe earned multiple

  • Azilian industry (stone tool culture)

    Azilian industry, tool tradition of Late Paleolithic and Early Mesolithic Europe, especially in France and Spain. The Azilian industry was preceded by the richer and more complex Magdalenian industry and was more or less contemporary with such industries as the Tardenoisian, Maglemosian, E

  • Azim Premji Foundation (Indian charitable nonprofit organization)

    Azim Premji: …2001 he established the nonprofit Azim Premji Foundation, through which he aimed to improve the quality of elementary education in rural regions throughout India. By the end of the first decade of the 21st century, the foundation had extended computer-aided education to more than 16,000 schools, with child-friendly content increasingly…

  • ?A?īm-al-Shān (Mughal leader)

    India: Cracks in the core: …Shah was his second son, ?A?īm al-Shān, who had accumulated a vast treasure as governor of Bengal and Bihar and had been his father’s chief adviser. His principal opponent was ?ulfiqār Khan (Dhū al-Fiqār Khan), a powerful Iranian noble, who was the chief bakhshī of the empire and the viceroy…

  • azimuth (physics)

    Azimuth, the angular distance from the north or south point of the horizon to the foot of the vertical circle through a heavenly body. The azimuth of a horizontal direction is its deviation from the north or

  • azimuth instrument (navigation)

    navigation: The liquid magnetic compass: The simplest, and probably earliest, azimuth instrument consists of two sights on opposite sides of the compass bowl connected by a thread. The assembly can be rotated to permit sighting on the distant object. Because it is impossible to sight through the instrument and look at the compass card simultaneously,…

  • azimuthal drift (geophysics)

    geomagnetic field: The ring current: Azimuthal drift is produced by two effects: a decrease in the strength of the main field away from Earth and a curvature of magnetic field lines. The first effect is easy to understand by considering the dependence of the particles’ radius of gyration on the…

  • Azimuthal Equidistant

    map: Map projections: …a particular city is the Azimuthal Equidistant. Such measurements are accurate or true only from the selected central point to any other point of interest.

  • azimuthal projection

    map: Map projections: Azimuthal, or zenithal, projections picture a portion of the Earth as a flattened disk, tangent to the Earth at a specified point, as viewed from a point at the centre of the Earth, on the opposite side of the Earth’s surface, or from a point…

  • azimuthal quantum number (chemistry)

    spectroscopy: Angular momentum quantum numbers: The number l, called the orbital quantum number, must be less than the principal quantum number n, which corresponds to a “shell” of electrons. Thus, l divides each shell into n subshells consisting of all electrons of the same principal and orbital quantum numbers.

  • azimuthally varying field cyclotron

    cyclotron: …in this way are called isochronous, or azimuthally-varying-field (AVF) cyclotrons.

  • Azione, Squadre d’ (Italian history)

    Giovanni Giolitti: …policy, he tolerated the Fascist squadristi (“armed squads”) when he could have crushed them, and, as the Fascists gained strength, he welcomed their support. He resigned in June 1921. While he was waiting for the right moment to take power again, the Fascists marched on Rome (October 1922) and took…

  • aziridine (chemistry)

    heterocyclic compound: Three-membered rings: …of nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur—aziridine, oxirane (or ethylene oxide), and thiirane, respectively—and their derivatives can all be prepared by nucleophilic reactions, of the type shown. Thus, aziridine is formed by heating β-aminoethyl hydrogen sulfate with a base (in this case Y is ―OSO3H).

  • ?Azīz bi?llāh Nizār Abū Man?ūr, al- (Fā?imid caliph)

    Al-?Azīz, caliph under whom the Fā?imid empire attained its greatest extent. The first of the Fā?imids to begin his reign in Egypt, where the caliphate was later centred, al-?Azīz succeeded his father, al-Mu?izz, in 975. He was ambitious to expand his domains at the expense of the Byzantine Empire

  • ?Azīz, al- (Fā?imid caliph)

    Al-?Azīz, caliph under whom the Fā?imid empire attained its greatest extent. The first of the Fā?imids to begin his reign in Egypt, where the caliphate was later centred, al-?Azīz succeeded his father, al-Mu?izz, in 975. He was ambitious to expand his domains at the expense of the Byzantine Empire

  • Aziz, Dr. (fictional character)

    Dr. Aziz, fictional character, a humble Muslim surgeon in A Passage to India (1924) by E.M. Forster. Aziz represents the native Indian community in conflict with the British ruling class. The central event of the novel is his trial for the alleged rape of a visiting Englishwoman, Adela

  • Aziz, Mohamed Ould Abdel (president of Mauritania)

    Mauritania: Coups of 2005 and 2008 and the return to stability: Mohamed Ould Abdel Aziz, Commander of the Presidential Guard, and Gen. Mohamed Ould Chiekh Ghazouani, Chief of Staff of the National Army. In response the military promptly staged a coup and removed him from power. In December 2008 Ould Abdallahi was released after several months’…

  • Aziz, Tariq (Iraqi public official)

    Tariq Aziz, Iraqi public official who served as foreign minister (1983–91) and deputy prime minister (1979–2003) in the Ba?thist government of Saddam Hussein. Tariq Aziz was born Mikhail Yuhanna to a Chaldean Catholic family in northern Iraq. He studied English at Baghdad University and worked as a

  • ?Azīz, ?āriq (Iraqi public official)

    Tariq Aziz, Iraqi public official who served as foreign minister (1983–91) and deputy prime minister (1979–2003) in the Ba?thist government of Saddam Hussein. Tariq Aziz was born Mikhail Yuhanna to a Chaldean Catholic family in northern Iraq. He studied English at Baghdad University and worked as a

  • ?Azīz-ud-Dīn ?ālamgīr II (Mughal emperor)

    ?ālamgīr II, Mughal emperor of India who disgraced his reign (1754–59) by his weakness and his disregard for his subjects’ welfare. A son of the emperor Jahāndār Shah (reigned 1712–13), ?ālamgīr was always the puppet of more powerful men and was placed on the throne by the imperial vizier ?Imād

  • ?Azl Island, Al- (island, Bahrain)

    Bahrain: Manufacturing: …a large yard operated on Al-?Azl Island. Light industries include the production of building materials, furniture, soft drinks, plastics, and a wide range of consumer goods. The government has a significant financial stake in all these modern industries. In addition to the aluminum smelter operated by Alba, an aluminum rolling…

  • azlon (textile)

    Azlon, synthetic textile fibre composed of protein material derived from natural sources. It is produced, like other synthetic fibres, by converting the raw material to a solution that is extruded through the holes of a device called a spinneret and then stretched to improve the alignment of the

  • ?A?m Palace (museum, ?amāh, Syria)

    ?amāh: The ?A?m Palace (Bayt al-?A?m), originally the residence of the governor of ?amāh (and later Damascus), As?ad Pa?a al-?A?m, was restored by the Syrian Department of Antiquities but was damaged in fighting in 1982. The perfectly preserved 18th-century residence is now a museum that houses artifacts…

  • azmari (Ethiopian bard)

    stringed instrument: For accompaniment: The azmari of Ethiopia sings lengthy historical epics and strophic love songs to his own accompaniment on the fiddle or lyre. In Japan, blind biwa players chant a narrative style of music known as katarimono; here the biwa is used only between verses for interludes and…

  • Azmi, Kaifi (Indian poet)

    Kaifi Azmi, one of the most renowned Indian poets of the 20th century, who sought to inspire social change through his passionate Urdu-language verse. He was also a noted lyricist for some of Bollywood’s best-known films. His cinematic work, though not extensive, is regarded as timeless for its

  • Aznar López, José María (prime minister of Spain)

    José María Aznar, lawyer and politician who served as prime minister of Spain from 1996 to 2004. Aznar was born into a politically active, conservative family in Spain. His grandfather was a friend of dictator General Francisco Franco, and both his father and grandfather held government jobs during

  • Aznar, José María (prime minister of Spain)

    José María Aznar, lawyer and politician who served as prime minister of Spain from 1996 to 2004. Aznar was born into a politically active, conservative family in Spain. His grandfather was a friend of dictator General Francisco Franco, and both his father and grandfather held government jobs during

  • azo compound (chemical compound)

    Azo compound, any organic chemical compound in which the azo group (―N=N―) is part of the molecular structure. The atomic groups attached to the nitrogen atoms may be of any organic class, but the commercially important azo compounds, those that make up more than half the commercial dyes, have the

  • Azo dei Porci (Italian jurist)

    Azzone Dei Porci , a leader of the Bolognese school of jurists and one of the few to write systematic summaries (summae) rather than textual glosses of Roman law as codified under the Byzantine emperor Justinian I (6th century ad). His Summa codicis and Apparatus ad codicem together provided a

  • azo dye (chemical compound)

    Azo dye, any of a large class of synthetic organic dyes that contain nitrogen as the azo group ―N=N― as part of their molecular structures; more than half the commercial dyes belong to this class. Depending on other chemical features, these dyes fall into several categories defined by the fibres

  • azo group (chemical group)

    dye: Azo dyes: …a ―N=N― unit, called an azo group; hence, the dyes containing this functional group are termed the azo dyes. The reaction of nitrous acid with Ar―NH2 (where Ar represents an aryl group) gives Ar―NN+, an aryldiazonium ion, which readily couples with anilines or phenols to furnish azo compounds. An early…

  • azo pigment (chemistry)

    pigment: Organic pigments include azo pigments, which contain a nitrogen group; they account for most of the organic red, orange, and yellow pigments. Copper phthalocyanines provide brilliant, strong blues and greens that are unusually colourfast for organic colours. Some pigments, such as fluorescent ones, are simply dyes that have…

  • Azo Soldanus (Italian jurist)

    Azzone Dei Porci , a leader of the Bolognese school of jurists and one of the few to write systematic summaries (summae) rather than textual glosses of Roman law as codified under the Byzantine emperor Justinian I (6th century ad). His Summa codicis and Apparatus ad codicem together provided a

  • azobenzene (chemical compound)

    azo compound: The synthesis of azobenzene from nitrobenzene by treatment with certain oxygen-removing reagents is an example of an alternate method useful for symmetrical azo compounds.

  • azodicarbonamide (chemical compound)

    plastic: Foamed thermoplastics: One commercial agent is azodicarbonamide, usually compounded with some other ingredients in order to modify the decomposition temperature and to aid in dispersion of the agent in the resin. One mole (116 grams) of azodicarbonamide generates about 39,000 cubic cm of nitrogen and other gases at 200 °C. Thus,…

  • Azogues (Ecuador)

    Azogues, city, south-central Ecuador. It lies in a high Andean valley northeast of Cuenca. Its economy is based on agricultural trade, and grains and fruit are cultivated in the surrounding area. Important local industries include flour milling, Panama hat making, and leather tanning. The city

  • azoic diazo (chemical process)

    dye: Azo dyeing techniques: …dyes are formed from an azoic diazo component and a coupling component. The first compound, an aniline, gives a diazonium salt upon treatment with nitrous acid; this salt reacts with the coupling component to form a dye, many of which are used as direct and disperse colorants. These dyes can…

  • azoic dye (chemical compound)

    Azo dye, any of a large class of synthetic organic dyes that contain nitrogen as the azo group ―N=N― as part of their molecular structures; more than half the commercial dyes belong to this class. Depending on other chemical features, these dyes fall into several categories defined by the fibres

  • azole (chemical compound)

    antifungal drug: The azoles: The azole antifungal agents, which are further divided into the imidazoles and triazoles, according to the number of nitrogen molecules in their organic ring structure, exert their effects by binding to fungal membranes and blocking the synthesis of fungal lipids, especially ergosterol. The azoles…

  • Azolinus Porcius (Italian jurist)

    Azzone Dei Porci , a leader of the Bolognese school of jurists and one of the few to write systematic summaries (summae) rather than textual glosses of Roman law as codified under the Byzantine emperor Justinian I (6th century ad). His Summa codicis and Apparatus ad codicem together provided a

  • Azolla (plant genus)

    Mosquito fern, (genus Azolla), genus of six or seven species of aquatic ferns of the family Salviniaceae. Members of Azolla are distributed nearly worldwide but are most diverse in tropical regions. Mosquito ferns float on the surface of still, fresh waters, sometimes becoming stranded on muddy

  • Azollaceae (plant family)

    fern: Annotated classification: …treated as separate families (Azollaceae and Salviniaceae), Azolla (about 6 species) and Salvinia (about 10 species), of floating aquatics, distributed nearly worldwide but most diverse in the tropics. Family Marsileaceae (clover ferns) Plants heterosporous; rhizomes

  • azomethine (chemical compound)

    amine: Addition: …amines react readily to form imines (also called azomethines or Schiff bases), R2C=NR′.

  • azonal soil

    Andes Mountains: Soils: The azonal soils—alluvials (soils incompletely evolved and stratified without definite profile) and lithosols (shallow soils consisting of imperfectly weathered rock fragments)—occupy much of the Andean massif. In Colombia, sandy yellow-brown azonal soils on slopes and in gorges are the base of the large coffee plantations.

  • azoospermia (medical condition)

    infertility: Abnormalities of sperm production: …ejaculate, a condition known as azoospermia. This condition can be caused by an obstruction of the genital tract, by testicular dysfunction associated with congenital disorders such as sickle cell disease, or by various illnesses.

  • Azores (archipelago, Portugal)

    Azores, archipelago and regi?o autónoma (autonomous region) of Portugal. The chain lies in the North Atlantic Ocean roughly 1,000 miles (1,600 km) west of mainland Portugal. It includes nine major islands. The Azores are divided into three widely separated island groups: the eastern group,

  • Azores anticyclone (meteorology)

    Azores high, large persistent atmospheric high-pressure centre that develops over the subtropical region of the eastern North Atlantic Ocean during the winter and spring seasons in the Northern Hemisphere. It is a subtropical high-pressure cell that moves westward during the summer and fall, when

  • Azores high (meteorology)

    Azores high, large persistent atmospheric high-pressure centre that develops over the subtropical region of the eastern North Atlantic Ocean during the winter and spring seasons in the Northern Hemisphere. It is a subtropical high-pressure cell that moves westward during the summer and fall, when

  • Azorín (Spanish literary critic)

    Azorín, novelist, essayist, and the foremost Spanish literary critic of his day. He was one of a group of writers who were engaged at the turn of the 20th century in a concerted attempt to revitalize Spanish life and letters. Azorín was the first to identify this group as the Generation of ’98—a n

  • azote (chemical element)

    Nitrogen (N), nonmetallic element of Group 15 [Va] of the periodic table. It is a colourless, odourless, tasteless gas that is the most plentiful element in Earth’s atmosphere and is a constituent of all living matter. atomic number 7 atomic weight 14.0067 melting point ?209.86 °C (?345.8 °F)

  • Azotobacter (bacteria)

    bacteria: Diversity of structure of bacteria: …are relatively large, such as Azotobacter, which has diameters of 2 to 5 μm or more; and Achromatium, which has a minimum width of 5 μm and a maximum length of 100 μm, depending on the species. Giant bacteria can be visible with the unaided eye, such as Thiomargarita namibiensis,…

  • Azov (Russia)

    Azov, town, Rostov oblast (province), southwestern Russia. It lies on the left bank of the Don River, 4 miles (7 km) east of the Sea of Azov. The Greek colony of Tanais, the first known major city in the region, was founded there in the 6th century bc. It changed hands and was renamed several times

  • Azov Upland (region, Ukraine)

    Azov Upland, hilly region, southeastern Ukraine. Part of the Ukrainian Crystalline Shield, the Azov Upland is an area of denuded mountains, extending from the Dnieper River for 100 miles (160 km) to the Donets Ridge and sloping gently down southeastward to the Sea of Azov. The highest point is

  • Azov, Sea of (sea, Eastern Europe)

    Sea of Azov, inland sea situated off the southern shores of Ukraine and Russia. It forms a northern extension of the Black Sea, to which it is linked on the south by the Kerch Strait. The Sea of Azov is about 210 miles (340 km) long and 85 miles (135 km) wide and has an area of about 14,500 square

  • Azovskoe More (sea, Eastern Europe)

    Sea of Azov, inland sea situated off the southern shores of Ukraine and Russia. It forms a northern extension of the Black Sea, to which it is linked on the south by the Kerch Strait. The Sea of Azov is about 210 miles (340 km) long and 85 miles (135 km) wide and has an area of about 14,500 square

  • Azovskoye More (sea, Eastern Europe)

    Sea of Azov, inland sea situated off the southern shores of Ukraine and Russia. It forms a northern extension of the Black Sea, to which it is linked on the south by the Kerch Strait. The Sea of Azov is about 210 miles (340 km) long and 85 miles (135 km) wide and has an area of about 14,500 square

  • Azraq, Al-Ba?r Al- (river, Africa)

    Blue Nile River, headstream of the Nile River and source of almost 70 percent of its floodwater at Khartoum. It reputedly rises as the Abāy from a spring 6,000 feet (1,800 metres) above sea level, near Lake Tana in northwestern Ethiopia. The river flows into and out of the lake, runs through a

  • Azraq, Al-Nīl Al- (river, Africa)

    Blue Nile River, headstream of the Nile River and source of almost 70 percent of its floodwater at Khartoum. It reputedly rises as the Abāy from a spring 6,000 feet (1,800 metres) above sea level, near Lake Tana in northwestern Ethiopia. The river flows into and out of the lake, runs through a

  • Azraqīs (Islamic sect)

    al-Muhallab ibn Abī ?ufrā: …undertake several campaigns against the Azraqīs, a fanatical Muslim sect that made war on all who would not join them. He eventually pursued them into Persia and was able to break their power after a religious schism divided their ranks. Al-Muhallab finally assumed his duties in Khorāsān and began to…

  • Azrou (Morocco)

    Ifrane: Azrou, 11 miles (17 km) southwest of Ifrane at an elevation of about 3,950 feet (1,204 metres), is an old Amazigh (Berber) settlement that was developed into an all-seasons resort; trout fishing is especially popular. The local Beni Mguild tribe grazes sheep and produces quality…

  • AZS (chemical compound)

    refractory: Other non-clay-based refractories: Alumina-zirconia-silica (AZS), which is melted and cast into molds or directly into the melting tanks of glass furnaces, is an excellent corrosion-resistant refractory that does not release impurities into the glass melt. AZS is also poured to make tank blocks (also called soldier blocks or sidewall…

  • AZT (drug)

    AZT, drug used to delay development of AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) in patients infected with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus). AZT belongs to a group of drugs known as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). In 1987 AZT became the first of these drugs to be approved by

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