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  • artificial lift

    petroleum production: Primary recovery: natural drive and artificial lift: …these cases, some means of “artificial lift” must be installed. The most common installation uses a pump at the bottom of the production tubing that is operated by a motor and a “walking beam” (an arm that rises and falls like a seesaw) on the surface. A string of solid…

  • artificial limb

    amputation: Furthermore, modern prostheses (artificial parts), particularly for amputations in the lower extremity, have reduced the handicap for the amputee. The congenital amputee seldom requires any corrective surgery but is helped by prosthetic replacement. There is no definitely known causative factor for congenital amputation, but it probably is not…

  • artificial neural network (artificial intelligence and psychology)

    cognitive science: Approaches: …be represented in structures called artificial neural networks, which are simplified models of the neurological structure of the brain. Each network consists of simple processing units and a set of connections between them. Signals between nodes are transmitted on the basis of the connections, the strength of the signal depending…

  • artificial organ

    Artificial organ, any machine, device, or other material that is used to replace the functions of a faulty or missing organ or other part of the human body. Artificial organs include the artificial heart and pacemaker (qq.v.), the use of dialysis (q.v.) to perform kidney functions, and the use of

  • artificial perception (technology)

    artificial intelligence: Perception: At present, artificial perception is sufficiently well advanced to enable optical sensors to identify individuals, autonomous vehicles to drive at moderate speeds on the open road, and robots to roam through buildings collecting empty soda cans. One of the earliest systems to integrate perception and action was…

  • artificial porcelain (pottery)

    Sèvres porcelain: …true, porcelain as well as soft-paste porcelain (a porcellaneous material rather than true porcelain) made at the royal factory (now the national porcelain factory) of Sèvres, near Versailles, from 1756 until the present; the industry was located earlier at Vincennes. On the decline of Meissen after 1756 from its supreme…

  • artificial reality (computer science)

    virtual reality: Entertainment: …environments, which he later called artificial reality. Much of Krueger’s work, especially his VIDEOPLACE system, processed interactions between a participant’s digitized image and computer-generated graphical objects. VIDEOPLACE could analyze and process the user’s actions in the real world and translate them into interactions with the system’s virtual objects in various…

  • artificial respiration

    Artificial respiration, breathing induced by some manipulative technique when natural respiration has ceased or is faltering. Such techniques, if applied quickly and properly, can prevent some deaths from drowning, choking, strangulation, suffocation, carbon monoxide poisoning, and electric shock.

  • artificial satellite (instrument)

    Earth satellite, artificial object launched into a temporary or permanent orbit around Earth. Spacecraft of this type may be either crewed or uncrewed, the latter being the most common. The idea of an artificial satellite in orbital flight was first suggested by Sir Isaac Newton in his book

  • artificial seasoning (food)

    flavouring: Imitation, artificial extracts, essences, and flavours: Imitation, artificial extracts, essences, and flavours are prepared by bringing into solution with alcohol, glycerol, or propylene glycol various synthetic flavouring agents to formulate an extract, essence, or flavour with the likeness of the flavour of the fruit, spirit, or…

  • artificial selection (genetics)

    zoology: Applied zoology: …largely as a consequence of selective breeding and improved animal nutrition. The purpose of selective breeding is to develop livestock whose desirable traits have strong heritable components and can therefore be propagated. Heritable components are distinguished from environmental factors by determining the coefficient of heritability, which is defined as the…

  • artificial silk (textile fibre)

    Rayon, artificial textile material composed of regenerated and purified cellulose derived from plant sources. Developed in the late 19th century as a substitute for silk, rayon was the first man-made fibre. Rayon is described as a regenerated fibre because the cellulose, obtained from soft woods or

  • artificial sweetener

    nutritional disease: Tooth decay: Artificial sweeteners are not cariogenic, and xylitol, a sugar alcohol used in some chewing gums, is even cariostatic, i.e., it reduces new tooth decay by inhibiting plaque and suppressing decay-causing bacteria. Putting an infant to sleep with a bottle, especially one containing juice or other…

  • artificial tree (geoengineering)

    geoengineering: Scrubbers and artificial trees: In contrast, artificial trees essentially would be a series of sticky, resin-covered filters that would convert captured CO2 to a carbonate called soda ash. Periodically, the soda ash would be washed off the filters and collected for storage.

  • artificial turf (grass product)

    Astrodome: AstroTurf, a brand of nylon grass named for the team, was developed when it became apparent that the dome’s Lucite panels prevented the growth of natural grass on the playing field.

  • Artigas (Spanish ceramicist)

    Joan Miró: Mature work and international recognition: …together with his potter friend José Lloréns Artigas, produced ceramics with a new impetuosity of expression: their vessels were often intentionally misshapen and fragmented.

  • Artigas (Uruguay)

    Artigas, city and river port, northwestern Uruguay. The city lies along the Cuareim River (Quaraí River in Brazil) across from Quaraí, Brazil, in the Santa Ana Hills (Santana Hills in Brazil). It was founded in 1852 as San Eugenio and was renamed in honour of José Gervasio Artigas, the national

  • Artigas, José Gervasio (Uruguayan revolutionary)

    José Gervasio Artigas, soldier and revolutionary leader who is regarded as the father of Uruguayan independence, although that goal was not attained until several years after he had been forced into exile. As a youth Artigas was a gaucho, or cowboy, in the interior of what is now Uruguay. In 1797

  • Artikulation (work by Ligeti)

    Gy?rgy Ligeti: , Artikulation, 1958) as well as music for instrumentalists and vocalists. In the early 1960s he caused a sensation with his Future of Music—A Collective Composition (1961) and his Poème symphonique (1962). The former consists of the composer regarding the audience from the stage and the…

  • Artilla (tor, Northern Territory, Australia)

    Mount Conner, most easterly of central Australia’s giant tors, or monoliths, which include Uluru/Ayers Rock and the Olga Rocks (Kata Tjuta), southern Northern Territory. Rising above the desert plain southeast of Lake Amadeus, Mount Conner is flat-topped and horseshoe-shaped and reaches to 2,500

  • artillery

    Artillery, in military science, crew-served big guns, howitzers, or mortars having a calibre greater than that of small arms, or infantry weapons. Rocket launchers are also commonly categorized as artillery, since rockets perform much the same function as artillery projectiles, but the term

  • Artillery Ground (sports field, London, United Kingdom)

    cricket: The early years: …to London, notably to the Artillery Ground, Finsbury, which saw a famous match between Kent and All-England in 1744. Heavy betting and disorderly crowds were common at matches.

  • artillery plant (plant)

    Pilea: Especially popular are the artillery plant, or rockweed (Pilea microphylla), with fine fernlike foliage and anthers that forcefully expel their pollen when mature; aluminum plant, or watermelon pilea (P. cadierei), with silvery markings on glossy dark green leaves; Chinese money plant (P. peperomioides), with long petioles (leaf stalks) attached…

  • Artin, Emil (German mathematician)

    Emil Artin, Austro-German mathematician who made fundamental contributions to class field theory, notably the general law of reciprocity. After one year at the University of G?ttingen, Artin joined the staff of the University of Hamburg in 1923. He emigrated to the United States in 1937, where he

  • Artinian, Artine (American literary scholar)

    Artine Artinian, Bulgarian-born American literary scholar (born Dec. 8, 1907, Pazardzhik, Bulg.—died Nov. 19, 2005, Lantana, Fla.), was a renowned French literature scholar. Artinian translated and edited The Complete Short Stories of Guy de Maupassant (1955), considered by many to be the d

  • Artinskian Stage (stratigraphy)

    Artinskian Stage, third of the four stages of the Lower Permian (Cisuralian) Series, representing those rocks deposited during Artinskian time (290.1 million to 279.3 million years ago) in the Permian Period. Rocks of Artinskian time were deposited in marine environments. In its type area in the

  • artiodactyl (mammal)

    Artiodactyl, any member of the mammalian order Artiodactyla, or even-toed ungulates, which includes pigs, peccaries, hippopotamuses, camels, chevrotains, deer, giraffes, pronghorn, antelopes, sheep, goats, and cattle. It is one of the larger mammal orders, containing about 200 species, a total that

  • Artiodactyla (mammal)

    Artiodactyl, any member of the mammalian order Artiodactyla, or even-toed ungulates, which includes pigs, peccaries, hippopotamuses, camels, chevrotains, deer, giraffes, pronghorn, antelopes, sheep, goats, and cattle. It is one of the larger mammal orders, containing about 200 species, a total that

  • Artis (zoo, Amsterdam, Netherlands)

    Artis Zoological Garden, zoological garden founded in 1838 by the Royal Zoological Society of Holland. It occupies a 10-hectare (25-acre) site in Amsterdam and houses nearly 5,600 specimens of some 1,350 species. Heavily oriented toward scientific research, the zoo has an animal behaviour

  • Artis Analyticae Praxis ad Aequationes Algebraicas Resolvendas (book by Harriot)

    Thomas Harriot: …however, was the posthumously published Artis Analyticae Praxis ad Aequationes Algebraicas Resolvendas (1631; “Application of Analytical Art to Solving Algebraic Equations”). (The editor of this work introduced the signs ? for multiplication, > for greater than, and < for less than.) Although Harriot published little and kept some of his…

  • Artis Diergaarde (zoo, Amsterdam, Netherlands)

    Artis Zoological Garden, zoological garden founded in 1838 by the Royal Zoological Society of Holland. It occupies a 10-hectare (25-acre) site in Amsterdam and houses nearly 5,600 specimens of some 1,350 species. Heavily oriented toward scientific research, the zoo has an animal behaviour

  • Artis Logicae (work by Milton)

    John Milton: Works on history and theology: Artis Logicae (1672; “Art of Logic”) was composed in Latin, perhaps to gain the attention also of a Continental audience. It is a textbook derived from the logic of Petrus Ramus, a 16th-century French scholar whose work reflected the impact of Renaissance humanism on the…

  • Artis Zoological Garden (zoo, Amsterdam, Netherlands)

    Artis Zoological Garden, zoological garden founded in 1838 by the Royal Zoological Society of Holland. It occupies a 10-hectare (25-acre) site in Amsterdam and houses nearly 5,600 specimens of some 1,350 species. Heavily oriented toward scientific research, the zoo has an animal behaviour

  • artisan (social class)

    organized labour: Origins of craft unionism: …adhered to a conception of artisan republicanism, which celebrated producerist values and the republican ideals of the American Revolution. Counter to this vision ran the corrosive impact of emergent industrial capitalism, which, in the view of the Philadelphia Workingmen’s Party, created “invidious distinctions [and] unjust and unnatural inequalities” by dividing…

  • Artisans’ Dwellings Act (United Kingdom [1875])

    United Kingdom: Gladstone and Disraeli: … authority in every area; the Artizans’ and Labourers’ Dwellings Improvement Act of the same year enabled local authorities to embark upon schemes of slum clearance; a factory act of 1878 fixed a 56-hour workweek; while further legislation dealt with friendly societies (private societies for mutual-health and old-age insurance), the protection…

  • artist

    Native American art: The role of the artist: The very use of the word art suggests one of the basic differences between European or European-derived and American Indian concepts. For not only did few Indian groups allow art to become a major way of life, as in the West, but many Native…

  • Artist Formerly Known as Prince, the (American singer, songwriter, musician, and producer)

    Prince, singer, guitarist, songwriter, producer, dancer, and performer on keyboards, drums, and bass who was among the most talented American musicians of his generation. Like Stevie Wonder, he was a rare composer who could perform at a professional level on virtually all the instruments he

  • Artist of Disappearance, The (work by Desai)

    Anita Desai: The Artist of Disappearance (2011) collected three novellas that examined the collateral abandonment and dislocation wrought by India’s furious rush toward modernity. Her daughter Kiran Desai won the Booker Prize for the novel The Inheritance of Loss (2006).

  • Artist of the Floating World, An (novel by Ishiguro)

    Kazuo Ishiguro: …Japan following World War II, An Artist of the Floating World (1986) chronicles the life of elderly Masuji Ono, who reviews his past career as a political artist of imperialist propaganda. Ishiguro’s Booker Prize-winning The Remains of the Day (1989; film 1993) is a first-person narrative, the reminiscences of Stevens,…

  • artist’s fungus (biology)

    Polyporales: …undersurface of artist’s fungus (Fomes applanatus, or Ganoderma applanatum), which darkens when cut, has been used for etching.

  • Artist’s Parents and Children, The (painting by Runge)

    Western painting: Germany: “The Artist’s Parents and Children” (1806; Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg) reflects not only his constant search for truth but also his admiration for the early German masters, through whose work he was made aware of the expressive power of line and colour. His interest in the…

  • Artist’s Sister in the Sitting Room, The (painting by Menzel)

    Adolf von Menzel: …with a Balcony (1845) and The Artist’s Sister in the Sitting Room (1847), Menzel presaged later developments of the Impressionist movement in France in his refined feeling for the effects of light and his use of open brushstrokes.

  • Artist’s Sister, Mme Pontilion, Seated on the Grass, The (painting by Morisot)

    Berthe Morisot: , The Artist’s Sister, Mme Pontillon, Seated on the Grass, 1873; and The Artist’s Sister Edma and Their Mother, 1870). Delicate and subtle, exquisite in colour—often with a subdued emerald glow—they won her the admiration of her Impressionist colleagues. Like that of the other Impressionists, her…

  • Artist’s Studio, a Real Allegory of a Seven-Year Long Phase of My Artistic Life, The (painting by Courbet)

    Gustave Courbet: Leader of the new school of Realism: …he completed in six weeks: The Artist’s Studio, an allegory of all the influences on Courbet’s artistic life, which are portrayed as human figures from all levels of society. Courbet himself presides over all the figures with ingenuous conceit, working on a landscape and turning his back to a nude…

  • Artist, The (film by Hazanavicius [2011])

    The Artist, French black-and-white film, released in 2011, that was an homage to movies of the 1920s and became the first mostly silent feature to win the Academy Award for best picture since the first Academy Awards ceremony in 1929. The movie also won the Golden Globe Award for best musical or

  • Artist, the (American singer, songwriter, musician, and producer)

    Prince, singer, guitarist, songwriter, producer, dancer, and performer on keyboards, drums, and bass who was among the most talented American musicians of his generation. Like Stevie Wonder, he was a rare composer who could perform at a professional level on virtually all the instruments he

  • Artistes Indépendants, Groupe des (modern art)

    Georges Seurat: …in the foundation of the Groupe des Artistes Indépendants, an association “with neither jury nor prizes,” where he showed his Baignade in June.

  • Artistes Indépendents, Société des (French organization)

    Georges Seurat: …the Baignade again, with the Société des Artistes Indépendents, which was to be of immense influence in the development of modern art.

  • Artistic Culture, Institute of (Soviet organization)

    Wassily Kandinsky: Russian interlude: In 1919 he created the Institute of Artistic Culture, became director of the Moscow Museum for Pictorial Culture, and helped to organize 22 museums across the Soviet Union. In 1920 he was made a professor at the University of Moscow and was honoured with a one-man show organized by the…

  • artistic direction (art)

    Directing, the craft of controlling the evolution of a performance out of material composed or assembled by an author. The performance may be live, as in a theatre and in some broadcasts, or it may be recorded, as in motion pictures and the majority of broadcast material. The term is also used in

  • artistic gymnastics

    gymnastics: History: …gymnastics is characterized by modern artistic gymnastics, the maneuvers of which are geared to beauty and not function. For example, in feudal Europe young men were taught to mount and dismount a horse, useful knowledge during a time when armies rode. Modern “horse” work in artistic gymnastics has evolved to…

  • artistic regimes (political philosophy)

    Jacques Rancière: …broadest of which Rancière calls artistic “regimes”—determine distributions of the sensible in the artistic domain and lend insight into the distributions that characterize larger society.

  • Artistry of the Mentally Ill (book by Prinzhorn)

    outsider art: History and characteristics: …and art historian Hans Prinzhorn’s Artistry of the Mentally Ill (1922), which became something of a touchstone for the Surrealists, especially Max Ernst, as well as for Dubuffet and subsequently many others.

  • Artists and Models (film by Tashlin [1955])

    Frank Tashlin: Films of the mid-1940s to mid-1950s: …as a director began with Artists and Models (1955), in which Dean Martin played a comic-book creator who uses the espionage-related dreams of his roommate (Jerry Lewis) as inspiration, provoking the interest of real spies. After The Lieutenant Wore Skirts (1956), with Tom Ewell and Sheree North, Tashlin directed (but…

  • Artists, Society of (British organization)

    Joshua Reynolds: Later years: …when Reynolds helped found the Society of Artists and the first of many successful exhibitions was held. The patronage of George III was sought, and in 1768 the Royal Academy was founded. Although Reynolds’s painting had found no favour at court, he was the obvious candidate for the presidency, and…

  • artium magister (academic degree)

    degree: …of coursework, the second degree, M.A. or M.S., may be obtained by examination or the completion of a piece of research. At the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, holders of a B.A. can receive an M.A. six or seven years after entering the university simply by paying certain fees. The…

  • Artivism/Instituto de Artivismo Hannah Arendt, Institute of (Cuban organization)

    Tania Bruguera: …activist who founded (2015) the Institute of Artivism/Instituto de Artivismo Hannah Arendt (INSTAR) in order to “foster civic literacy and policy change.” Her advocacy of free speech often ran afoul of the Cuban government.

  • Artizans’ and Labourers’ Dwellings Improvement Act (United Kingdom [1875])

    United Kingdom: Gladstone and Disraeli: … authority in every area; the Artizans’ and Labourers’ Dwellings Improvement Act of the same year enabled local authorities to embark upon schemes of slum clearance; a factory act of 1878 fixed a 56-hour workweek; while further legislation dealt with friendly societies (private societies for mutual-health and old-age insurance), the protection…

  • Artocarpus altilis (tree and fruit)

    Breadfruit, (Artocarpus altilis), tree of the mulberry family (Moraceae) and its large fruits that are a staple food of the South Pacific and other tropical areas. Breadfruit contains considerable amounts of starch and is seldom eaten raw. It may be roasted, baked, boiled, fried, or dried and

  • Artocarpus altilis (tree)
  • Artocarpus communis (tree)
  • Artocarpus heterophyllus (tree, vegetable, and fruit)

    Jackfruit, (Artocarpus heterophyllus), evergreen tree (family Moraceae) native to tropical Asia and widely grown throughout the wetland tropics for its large fruits and durable wood. The greenish unripe fruit is cooked as a vegetable, and the brown ripened fruit is eaten fresh for the sweetly acid

  • Artocarpus incisa (tree)
  • Artois (historical region, France)

    Artois, historic and cultural region encompassing most of the northern French département of Pas-de-Calais and coextensive with the former province of Artois. The names of Artois and Arras, the capital, are derived from the Atrebates, who inhabited the district during Julius Caesar’s time. From

  • Artois, Charles-Philippe, comte d’ (king of France)

    Charles X, king of France from 1824 to 1830. His reign dramatized the failure of the Bourbons, after their restoration, to reconcile the tradition of the monarchy by divine right with the democratic spirit produced in the wake of the French Revolution. The fifth son of the dauphin Louis and Maria

  • Artois, Union of (European history)

    history of the Low Countries: Unification after Alba: 6, 1579, the Union of Arras (Artois) was formed in the south among Artois, Hainaut, and the town of Douay, based on the Pacification of Ghent but retaining the Roman Catholic religion, loyalty to the king, and the privileges of the estates. As a reaction to the accommodation…

  • Art?t, Désirée (Belgian singer)

    Désirée Art?t, Belgian mezzo-soprano, member of a famous family of musicians. Acclaimed in France as an opera singer, she suddenly married (1869) the Spanish baritone Mariano Padilla y Ramos (1842–1906) while briefly engaged to Tchaikovsky. Her daughter Lola Art?t de Padilla (1885–1933), a soprano

  • Art?t, Marguerite-Joséphine-Désirée Montagney (Belgian singer)

    Désirée Art?t, Belgian mezzo-soprano, member of a famous family of musicians. Acclaimed in France as an opera singer, she suddenly married (1869) the Spanish baritone Mariano Padilla y Ramos (1842–1906) while briefly engaged to Tchaikovsky. Her daughter Lola Art?t de Padilla (1885–1933), a soprano

  • arts

    The arts, modes of expression that use skill or imagination in the creation of aesthetic objects, environments, or experiences that can be shared with others. Traditional categories within the arts include literature (including poetry, drama, story, and so on), the visual arts (painting, drawing,

  • Arts & Design, Museum of (museum, New York City, New York, United States)

    Museum of Arts & Design (MAD), museum in New York, N.Y., dedicated to the collection and exhibition of contemporary works and objects made from clay, glass, wood, metal, and fibre. It emphasizes craft, art, and design but is also concerned with the broader subjects of architecture, fashion,

  • Arts and Crafts movement (British and international movement)

    Arts and Crafts movement, English aesthetic movement of the second half of the 19th century that represented the beginning of a new appreciation of the decorative arts throughout Europe. By 1860 a vocal minority had become profoundly disturbed by the level to which style, craftsmanship, and public

  • Arts and Letters (racehorse)

    Majestic Prince: …establishment placed him second to Arts and Letters. Despite a field of only eight horses, the race hinged on which of the two favoured horses would come out on top from their blistering drive down the stretch. Majestic Prince did so by a neck. It was the fifth Derby victory…

  • Arts and Pageant of the Masters, Festival of (festival, California, United States)

    Laguna Beach: The Festival of Arts and Pageant of the Masters is held at Irvine Bowl, a natural amphitheatre just east of the city; held nightly in July and August, the pageant re-creates contemporary and classical artworks with elaborate sets and people posing to resemble characters in the…

  • Arts and the Mass Media, The (essay by Alloway)

    Lawrence Alloway: …of Architectural Design titled “The Arts and the Mass Media,” in which he articulated the key concepts that would eventually frame all his subsequent work, namely, that “there is in popular art a continuum from data to fantasy.” This essay was a refutation of the high art versus kitsch…

  • Arts Bridge (bridge, Paris, France)

    Paris: The Institute of France: The Arts Bridge leads from the Institute of France across the Seine to the Louvre. One of the most charming of all the Parisian bridges, it was the first (1803) to be made of iron, and it has always been reserved for pedestrians; it provides an…

  • Arts Centre (institution, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia)

    Victoria: Cultural life: The creation of the Arts Centre (1984), on land near the centre of the city of Melbourne, was an important cultural development for the state. The multifunctional institution includes art galleries, courtyards for theatrical productions and displays of sculpture, underground theatres, a convention and concert hall, a display centre,…

  • Arts Council of Great Britain (British organization)

    United Kingdom: The arts: The independent Arts Council of Great Britain, which was founded in 1946, supported many kinds of contemporary creative and performing arts until 1994, when it devolved into the Arts Council of England (which became Arts Council England in 2003 after joining with the Regional Arts Boards), the…

  • Arts in Society (American periodical)

    history of publishing: The United States: …political and economic problems; and Arts in Society (founded 1958), a forum for the discussion of the role of art, which also publishes poetry and reviews. Of general political journals, the oldest still in publication in the 1990s was The Nation, founded in 1865 by E.L. Godkin and edited in…

  • Arts of Decoration, Museum for the (museum, New York City, New York, United States)

    Cooper Union: …Museum (formerly, until 1976, the Museum for the Arts of Decoration), opened in 1897, provides important resources for designers in the decorative arts; it is administered by the Smithsonian Institution. Cooper Union’s library was the first free public reading room in New York City.

  • arts, African

    African arts, the visual, performing, and literary arts of native Africa, particularly those of sub-Saharan Africa. The African arts are treated in a number of articles; see African literature; South African literature; African architecture; African art; African dance; African music; and African

  • arts, Central Asian

    Central Asian arts, the literary, performing, and visual arts of a large portion of Asia embracing the Turkic republics (Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan), Tajikistan, Azerbaijan, Afghanistan, Mongolia, Tibet, Nepal, Sikkim, Bhutan, and parts of Russia and China. As used here, the

  • arts, East Asian

    East Asian arts, the visual arts, performing arts, and music of China, Korea (North Korea and South Korea), and Japan. (The literature of this region is treated in separate articles on Chinese literature, Korean literature, and Japanese literature.) Some studies of East Asia also include the

  • arts, Islamic

    Islamic arts, the literary, performing, and visual arts of the vast populations of the Middle East and elsewhere that adopted the Islamic faith from the 7th century onward. These adherents of the faith have created such an immense variety of literatures, performing arts, visual arts, and music that

  • arts, Native American (visual arts)

    Native American art, the visual art of the aboriginal inhabitants of the Americas, often called American Indians. For a further discussion of the visual art of the Americas produced in the period after European contact, see Latin American art. The very use of the word art suggests one of the basic

  • arts, Oceanic

    Oceanic arts, the literary, performing, and visual arts of the Pacific Islands, including Australia, New Zealand, and Easter Island, and the general culture areas of Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia. Many of the island clusters within these culture areas are separated by vast stretches of

  • Arts, Place des (cultural centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada)

    Montreal: Cultural life: The Place des Arts is a complex of concert and theatre halls in downtown Montreal. Adjacent to it is the Museum of Contemporary Art, which was founded in 1964 and moved to its present location in 1992. Also nearby is the Complexe Desjardins, an exciting example…

  • arts, South Asian

    South Asian arts, the literary, performing, and visual arts of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. Despite a history of ethnic, linguistic, and political fragmentation, the people of the Indian subcontinent are unified by a common cultural and ethical outlook; a wealth of ancient textual

  • arts, Southeast Asian

    Southeast Asian arts, the literary, performing, and visual arts of Southeast Asia. Although the cultural development of the area was once dominated by Indian influence, a number of cohesive traits predate the Indian influence. Wet-rice (or padi) agriculture, metallurgy, navigation, ancestor cults,

  • arts, the

    The arts, modes of expression that use skill or imagination in the creation of aesthetic objects, environments, or experiences that can be shared with others. Traditional categories within the arts include literature (including poetry, drama, story, and so on), the visual arts (painting, drawing,

  • arts, Western

    Western arts, the literary, performing, and visual arts of Europe and regions that share a European cultural tradition, including the United States and Canada. Diverse as the European continent is, the artistic traditions of its nations share many common traits. The antecedents of most European

  • Artsakh (region, Azerbaijan)

    Nagorno-Karabakh, region of southwestern Azerbaijan. The name is also used to refer to an autonomous oblast (province) of the former Azerbaijan Soviet Socialist Republic (S.S.R.) and to the Republic of Nagorno-Karabakh, a self-declared country whose independence is not internationally recognized.

  • Artsau, Mrs. Ogniblat L’ (Australian writer)

    Miles Franklin, Australian author of historical fiction who wrote from feminist and nationalist perspectives. Franklin grew up in isolated bush regions of New South Wales that were much like the glum setting of her first novel, My Brilliant Career (1901; filmed 1980), with its discontented, often

  • ArtServe (virtual museum)

    virtual museum: …pioneers in this field is ArtServe, a collection of thousands of images, particularly of classical art and architecture, made available by the Australian National University for teachers and students of art history. Virtual museums in this sense offer the student many benefits—not least in the selection of material for detailed…

  • Artsybashev, Mikhail Petrovich (Russian author)

    Mikhail Petrovich Artsybashev, Russian prose writer whose works were noted for their extreme pessimism, violence, and eroticism. Artsybashev began publishing short stories in 1895, but it was not until 1903–04 that he achieved an amount of fame. His most famous work is the novel Sanin (Eng. trans.

  • Artuq ibn Ekseb (Artuqid ruler)

    Artuqid Dynasty: Artuq ibn Ekseb, founder of the dynasty, was rewarded for his services to the Seljuq sultan with the grant of Palestine in 1086. Forced out of Palestine by the Fā?imids of Egypt, Artuq’s descendant Mu?īn ad-Dīn S?kmen returned to Diyarbak?r, where he took ?i?n Kayfā…

  • Artuqid dynasty (Turkmen dynasty)

    Artuqid Dynasty, Turkmen dynasty that ruled the province of Diyarbak?r in northern Iraq (now in southeastern Turkey) through two branches: at ?i?n Kayfā and āmid (1098–1232) and at Mardin and Mayyāfāriqīn (1104–1408). Artuq ibn Ekseb, founder of the dynasty, was rewarded for his services to the

  • Arturo (magazine)

    Concrete Invention: …issue of the illustrated magazine Arturo, with texts and reproductions of work by many artists, including Joaquín Torres García, Lidy Prati, Wassily Kandinsky, and Piet Mondrian. The appearance of Arturo, which expressed its contributors’ opposition to representational and symbolic art, marked the beginning of a dynamic period in Argentine art.…

  • Arturo Ui (play by Brecht)

    Bertolt Brecht: …Aufstieg des Arturo Ui (1957; The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui), a parable play of Hitler’s rise to power set in prewar Chicago; Herr Puntila und sein Knecht Matti (1948; Herr Puntila and His Man Matti), a Volksstück (popular play) about a Finnish farmer who oscillates between churlish sobriety and…

  • Arturo’s Island (novel by Morante)

    Elsa Morante: …novel, L’isola di Arturo (1957; Arturo’s Island), examines a boy’s growth from childhood dreams to the painful disillusions of adulthood. This novel, for which she won the Strega Prize, is notable for its delicate lyricism and its mingling of realistic detail with an air of unreality; it is often compared…

  • Artusi, Giovanni Maria (Italian music theorist)

    Claudio Monteverdi: The Gonzaga court: …attacks by a Bolognese theorist, Giovanni Maria Artusi, in a series of pamphlets, made Monteverdi the most famous composer of the age and provoked him to reply with an important aesthetic statement of his view on the nature of his art. He disclaimed the role of revolutionary, saying that he…

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