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  • Arab Revolt (Middle Eastern history [1916-1918])

    T.E. Lawrence on guerrilla warfare: GUERRILLA WARFARE: …the concrete experience of the Arab Revolt against the Turks 1916–1918. But the historical example in turn gains value from the fact that its course was guided by the practical application of the theories here set forth.

  • Arab Revolt Flag (1917)

    flag of Jordan: …and July 1958—was the original Arab Revolt Flag without the star. Different interpretations have been given to the seven points of the star, but originally they were associated with the former districts of Syria (Aleppo, Damascus, Beirut, Lebanon, Palestine, Transjordan, and Deir ez-Zor).

  • ?Arab Sarā?ī (building, Delhi, India)

    Akbar period architecture: …in the gateway to the ?Arab Sarā?ī (guesthouse at Humāyūn’s tomb), Delhi (1560–61), the Ajmer fort (1564–73), the Lahore fort with its outstanding decoration (1586–1618), and the Allahabad fort (1583–84), now largely dismantled.

  • Arab Socialist Ba?ath Party (Arab political party)

    Ba?ath Party, Pan-Arabist political party advocating the formation of a single Arab socialist nation. It has branches in many Middle Eastern countries and was the ruling party in Syria from 1963 and in Iraq from 1968 to 2003. The Ba?ath Party was founded in 1943 in Damascus, Syria, by Michel Aflaq

  • Arab Socialist Ba?th Party (Arab political party)

    Ba?ath Party, Pan-Arabist political party advocating the formation of a single Arab socialist nation. It has branches in many Middle Eastern countries and was the ruling party in Syria from 1963 and in Iraq from 1968 to 2003. The Ba?ath Party was founded in 1943 in Damascus, Syria, by Michel Aflaq

  • Arab Socialist Renaissance Party (Arab political party)

    Ba?ath Party, Pan-Arabist political party advocating the formation of a single Arab socialist nation. It has branches in many Middle Eastern countries and was the ruling party in Syria from 1963 and in Iraq from 1968 to 2003. The Ba?ath Party was founded in 1943 in Damascus, Syria, by Michel Aflaq

  • Arab Socialist Republic

    Egypt, country located in the northeastern corner of Africa. Egypt’s heartland, the Nile River valley and delta, was the home of one of the principal civilizations of the ancient Middle East and, like Mesopotamia farther east, was the site of one of the world’s earliest urban and literate

  • Arab Socialist Union (political party, Egypt)

    Egypt: Government and society: …Union in 1957—from 1962 the Arab Socialist Union (ASU)—which dominated political life in Egypt for the next 15 years. An interim constitution was promulgated in 1964.

  • Arab Spring (pro-democracy protests)

    Arab Spring, wave of pro-democracy protests and uprisings that took place in the Middle East and North Africa beginning in 2010 and 2011, challenging some of the region’s entrenched authoritarian regimes. Demonstrators expressing political and economic grievances faced violent crackdowns by their

  • Arab Spring: The End of the Beginning, The

    No one could say for certain what Tunisian street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi was thinking when he set fire to himself on Dec. 17, 2010, in the town of Sidi Bouzid, but he probably could not have imagined that his action would spark in his own country a Jasmine Revolution, which in 2011 evolved into a

  • Arab States Broadcasting Union

    broadcasting: International organizations: The Arab States Broadcasting Union was formed in 1969 as an intergovernmental organization within the framework of the Arab League; the secretariat is in Cairo, and the technical centre is located in Khartoum, Sudan. The Asociación Internacional de Radiodifusión primarily covers North, Central, and South America…

  • Arab States, League of

    Arab League, regional organization of Arab states in the Middle East and parts of Africa, formed in Cairo on March 22, 1945, as an outgrowth of Pan-Arabism. The founding member states were Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Transjordan (now Jordan), Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. Other members are Libya

  • Arab Uprisings 2010–2013

    The year 2013 marked the third since the beginning of the 2010–11 Arab uprisings. In the main sites of protest—Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen, Libya, Bahrain, and Syria—events during the year dispelled the early optimism that had accompanied the spread of popular revolt throughout the region. Instead of

  • Arab Women’s Solidarity Association (international organization)

    Nawal El Saadawi: …1982 El Saadawi founded the Arab Women’s Solidarity Association (AWSA) and later served as editor of the organization’s publication, Al-nūn. In 1991 the government closed down Al-nūn and then, several months later, AWSA itself. Due to her outspoken views, El Saadawi continued to face frequent legal challenges from political and…

  • Arab World, Institute of the (building, Paris, France)

    Jean Nouvel: …audience in 1987 when the Institute of the Arab World (Institut du Monde Arabe [IMA]) was completed. The main, south facade of that building, with its high-tech aperture-like panels, manages to be at once cutting-edge in its creative response to changing levels of light and evocative of traditional Arab moucharaby…

  • ?Arab, Bahr al- (river, Sudan)

    Ba?r al-?Arab, intermittent river of southwestern Sudan, rising northeast of the Tondou (Bongo) Massif, near the border with the Central African Republic. The river flows 500 miles (800 km) east-southeast to join the Ba?r al-Ghazāl, a tributary of the Nile River, at Ghābat al-?Arab in South Sudan.

  • ?Arab, Jazīrat al- (peninsula, Asia)

    Arabia, peninsular region, together with offshore islands, located in the extreme southwestern corner of Asia. The Arabian Peninsula is bounded by the Red Sea on the west and southwest, the Gulf of Aden on the south, the Arabian Sea on the south and southeast, and the Gulf of Oman and the Persian

  • ?Arab, Sha?? Al- (river, Iraq)

    Sha?? Al-?Arab, (Arabic: “Stream of the Arabs”) river in southeastern Iraq, formed by the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers at the town of Al-Qurnah. It flows southeastward for 120 miles (193 km) and passes the Iraqi port of Basra and the Iranian port of Abadan before emptying into the

  • Arab-Israeli wars

    Arab-Israeli wars, series of military conflicts between Israeli and various Arab forces, most notably in 1948–49, 1956, 1967, 1973, 1982, and 2006. In November 1947 the United Nations (UN) voted to partition the British mandate of Palestine into a Jewish state and an Arab state (see United Nations

  • Araba (ancient state, Iraq)

    Hatra: …prominence as the capital of Araba, a small semiautonomous state under Parthian influence. Because of its strategic position along caravan trade routes, the town prospered and became an important religious centre. In the 1st and 2nd centuries ce Hatra was ruled by a dynasty of Arabian princes whose written language…

  • ?Arābā al-Madfūnah, Al- (ancient city, Egypt)

    Abydos, prominent sacred city and one of the most important archaeological sites of ancient Egypt. The site, located in the low desert west of the Nile River near Al-Balyanā, was a necropolis for the earliest Egyptian royalty and later a pilgrimage centre for the worship of Osiris. The western

  • ?Arabah, Battle of Wadi Al- (Middle Eastern history)

    Palestine: The rise of Islam: …first battle took place at Wadi Al-?Arabah, south of the Dead Sea. The Byzantine defenders were defeated and retreated toward Gaza but were overtaken and almost annihilated. In other places, however, the natural advantages of the defenders were more effective, and the invaders were hard-pressed. Khālid ibn al-Walīd, then operating…

  • ?Arabah, Wadi Al- (region, Palestine)

    Wadi Al-?Arabah, topographic depression in southern Palestine extending about 100 miles (160 km) south from the Dead Sea to the Gulf of Aqaba; it is part of the East African Rift System. Largely sandy desert, it is divided between Israel and Jordan. In the Old Testament, except in Deuteronomy 2:8,

  • Arabat Spit (sandbar, Ukraine)

    Syvash: …it is separated by the Arabat Spit, a sandbar measuring from 900 feet to 5 miles (270 m to 8 km) in width. Syvash covers an area of approximately 990 square miles (2,560 square km) and is covered with mineral salts during the summer months. The salts are used in…

  • Arabel’s Raven (work by Aiken)

    Joan Aiken: In 1974 Arabel’s Raven was published and launched a popular series that followed the adventures of Arabel and Mortimer, her pet raven. A prolific writer, Aiken penned more than 60 short-story collections and novels for children. Her many books of adult fiction, beginning with The Silence of…

  • Arabella (opera by Strauss)

    Lotte Lehmann: …her the title role in Arabella (1933), chose her for roles in several of his operas. Lehmann also appeared successfully on English stages from 1913 and in the United States from 1930. At the Metropolitan Opera in New York City she sang chiefly Wagnerian roles. From 1938 she lived in…

  • Arabeski (work by Gogol)

    short story: Russian writers: Gogol published his Arabesques (1835) five years before Poe collected some of his tales under a similar title. Like those of Poe, Gogol’s tales of hallucination, confusing reality and dream, are among his best stories (“Nevsky Prospect” and “Diary of a Madman,” both 1835). The single most influential…

  • arabesque (literature)

    Arabesque, in literature, a contrived intricate pattern of verbal expression, so called by analogy with a decorative style in which flower, fruit, and sometimes animal outlines appear in elaborate patterns of interlaced lines. That these designs can sometimes suggest fantastic creatures may have

  • Arabesque (film by Donen [1966])

    Stanley Donen: Films of the 1960s and ’70s: Donen’s next significant effort was Arabesque (1966). A somewhat confusing espionage yarn set in London, it starred Gregory Peck as a bewildered American professor opposite Sophia Loren.

  • arabesque (ballet position)

    ballet position: The arabesque is a body position in which the weight of the body is supported on one leg, while the other leg is extended in back with the knee straight. One of the most graceful of ballet positions, the arabesque can be varied in many ways…

  • arabesque (decorative style)

    Arabesque, style of decoration characterized by intertwining plants and abstract curvilinear motifs. Derived from the work of Hellenistic craftsmen working in Asia Minor, the arabesque originally included birds in a highly naturalistic setting. As adapted by Muslim artisans about ad 1000, it

  • Arabesques (work by Gogol)

    short story: Russian writers: Gogol published his Arabesques (1835) five years before Poe collected some of his tales under a similar title. Like those of Poe, Gogol’s tales of hallucination, confusing reality and dream, are among his best stories (“Nevsky Prospect” and “Diary of a Madman,” both 1835). The single most influential…

  • ?Arabestān (geographical region, Iran)

    Khūzestān, geographic region in southwestern Iran, lying at the head of the Persian Gulf and bordering Iraq on the west. It is notable for its oil resources. The area that is now Khūzestān was settled about 6000 bc by a people with affinities to the Sumerians, who came from the Zagros Mountains

  • Arabī (people)

    Arab, one whose native language is Arabic. (See also Arabic language.) Before the spread of Islam and, with it, the Arabic language, Arab referred to any of the largely nomadic Semitic inhabitants of the Arabian Peninsula. In modern usage, it embraces any of the Arabic-speaking peoples living in

  • ?Arabī (people)

    Arab, one whose native language is Arabic. (See also Arabic language.) Before the spread of Islam and, with it, the Arabic language, Arab referred to any of the largely nomadic Semitic inhabitants of the Arabian Peninsula. In modern usage, it embraces any of the Arabic-speaking peoples living in

  • Arabi Pasha (Egyptian nationalist)

    ?Urābī Pasha, Egyptian nationalist who led a social-political movement that expressed the discontent of the Egyptian educated classes, army officials, and peasantry with foreign control. ?Urābī, the son of a village sheikh, studied in Cairo at al-Azhar, the preeminent institution of Arabic and

  • Arabia (peninsula, Asia)

    Arabia, peninsular region, together with offshore islands, located in the extreme southwestern corner of Asia. The Arabian Peninsula is bounded by the Red Sea on the west and southwest, the Gulf of Aden on the south, the Arabian Sea on the south and southeast, and the Gulf of Oman and the Persian

  • Arabia (Roman province)

    Arabia, Roman province created out of the former kingdom of the Nabataeans and the adjacent Syrian cities of Gerasa and Philadelphia (modern Jarash and ?Ammān, Jordan, respectively), after the formal annexation of the Nabataean kingdom by the Roman emperor Trajan in ad 105. The province was

  • Arabia Deserta (ancient region, Arabia)

    Arabia Felix: …a region that contrasted with Arabia Deserta in barren central and northern Arabia and with Arabia Petraea (“Stony Arabia”) in northwestern Arabia, which came under the suzerainty of imperial Rome. The Greeks and Romans chose the name because of the area’s pleasant climate and reputed riches in agricultural products and…

  • Arabia Felix (ancient region, Arabia)

    Arabia Felix, (Latin: “Happy, or Flourishing, Arabia”) in ancient geography, the comparatively fertile region in southwestern and southern Arabia (in present-day Asir and Yemen), a region that contrasted with Arabia Deserta in barren central and northern Arabia and with Arabia Petraea (“Stony

  • Arabia Oy (factory, Finland)

    pottery: Pottery factories: and Gustavsberg in Sweden and Arabia Oy in Finland achieved a growing reputation for excellent design in the modern idiom. The emphasis on form in present-day pottery is to a great extent due to the import of Chinese wares of the Song dynasty (see below China: Song dynasty) during the…

  • Arabia Petraea (ancient region, Arabia)

    Jordan: Biblical associations: …of the new province called Arabia Petraea, with its capital first at Petra and later at Bu?rā al-Shām in Syria. After 313, Christianity became a recognized religion, and a large number of churches were built.

  • Arabian American Oil Company (oil company)

    Saudi Aramco, Oil company founded by the Standard Oil Co. of California (Chevron) in 1933, when the government of Saudi Arabia granted it a concession. Other U.S. companies joined after oil was found near Dhahran in 1938. In 1950 Aramco opened a pipeline from Saudi Arabia to the Mediterranean Sea

  • Arabian architecture
  • Arabian art (ancient art)

    Arabian art and architecture, the art and architecture of ancient Arabia. The pre-Islāmic history of the great Arabian subcontinent is primarily that of a nomadic people. By the second half of the 20th century, traces of their art and architecture had been found only in the long-settled agrarian

  • Arabian baboon (primate)

    Hamadryas, (Papio hamadryas), large, powerful monkey of the plains and open-rock areas of the Red Sea coast, both in Africa (Eritrea, The Sudan) and on the opposite coast in Yemen and Saudi Arabia. The hamadryas is the smallest baboon species, with a body length of about 60–70 cm (24–28 inches) and

  • Arabian Basin (submarine basin, Arabian Sea)

    Arabian Basin, submarine basin of the southern Arabian Sea, rising to meet the submerged Carlsberg Ridge to the south, the Maldive Islands to the southeast, India and Pakistan to the northeast, Iran to the north, and the Arabian Peninsula to the west. It has a maximum depth of 19,275 feet (5,875

  • Arabian bustard (bird)

    bustard: The Arabian bustard (A. arabs) is found in Morocco and in northern tropical Africa south of the Sahara, as are a number of species belonging to several other genera. In Australia the bustard Choriotis australis is called turkey.

  • Arabian camel (camel)

    Dromedary, Arabian (one-humped) riding camel (Camelus dromedarius), a swift domestic species not found in the wild. Although wild dromedaries are extinct, the importation of dromedaries to Australia in the 19th century resulted in the establishment of a feral population that continues to live in

  • Arabian Desert (desert, Egypt)

    Eastern Desert, large desert in eastern Egypt. Originating just southeast of the Nile River delta, it extends southeastward into northeastern Sudan and from the Nile River valley eastward to the Gulf of Suez and the Red Sea. It covers an area of about 85,690 square miles (221,940 square km). The

  • Arabian Desert (desert, Arabian Peninsula)

    Arabian Desert, great desert region of extreme southwestern Asia that occupies almost the entire Arabian Peninsula. It is the largest desert area on the continent—covering an area of about 900,000 square miles (2,300,000 square km)—and the second largest on Earth, surpassed in size only by the

  • Arabian gazelle (mammal)

    gazelle: Asian gazelles: subgutturosa), the Arabian gazelle (G. arabica; now extinct), the Saudi gazelle (G. saudiya; now extinct in the wild), the Queen of Sheba’s gazelle (G. bilkis; now extinct), and the dorcas gazelle (G. dorcas). The dorcas gazelle also ranges into North Africa. The range of the goitred gazelle…

  • Arabian Gulf (gulf, Middle East)

    Persian Gulf, shallow marginal sea of the Indian Ocean that lies between the Arabian Peninsula and southwestern Iran. The sea has an area of about 93,000 square miles (241,000 square km). Its length is some 615 miles (990 km), and its width varies from a maximum of about 210 miles (340 km) to a

  • Arabian horse (breed of horse)

    Arabian horse, earliest improved breed of horse, valued for its speed, stamina, beauty, intelligence, and gentleness. The breed’s long history has been obscured by legend, but it had been developed in Arabia by the 7th century ce. The Arabian horse has contributed its qualities to most of the

  • Arabian Iraq (ancient region, Middle East)

    Iraq: Iraq from 1055 to 1534: The first, qualified as Arabian Iraq (?Irāq ?Arabī), denoted the area roughly corresponding to ancient Mesopotamia or the modern nation of Iraq and consisted of Upper Iraq or Al-Jazīrah and Lower Iraq or Al-Sawād (“The Black [Lands]”). The town of Tikrīt was traditionally considered to mark the border between…

  • Arabian jasmine (plant)

    Oleaceae: The flowers of Jasminum sambac are used for making necklaces, or leis, in Hawaii. Lilacs, jasmines, and Osmanthus are especially noted for their sweetly fragrant flowers. Osmanthus and a few species of jasmines are prized in China and Japan, where their dried flowers are used to scent certain…

  • Arabian leopard (mammal)

    leopard: Conservation status: pardus orientalis), Arabian leopard (P. pardus nimr), and Javan leopard (P. pardus melas) continued to decrease, with several of these subspecies declining to critical levels.

  • Arabian medicine

    Unani medicine, a traditional system of healing and health maintenance observed in South Asia. The origins of Unani medicine are found in the doctrines of the ancient Greek physicians Hippocrates and Galen. As a field, it was later developed and refined through systematic experiment by the Arabs,

  • Arabian Nights, The (Asian literature)

    The Thousand and One Nights, collection of largely Middle Eastern and Indian stories of uncertain date and authorship. Its tales of Aladdin, Ali Baba, and Sindbad the Sailor have almost become part of Western folklore, though these were added to the collection only in the 18th century in European

  • Arabian oryx (mammal)

    oryx: The Arabian, or white, oryx (O. leucoryx) is the smallest, 102 cm (40 inches) tall and weighing 75 kg (165 pounds), with only faint dark markings to offset its whitish coat. The scimitar-horned oryx (O. dammah), 120 cm (47 inches) tall and weighing 200 kg (440…

  • Arabian Peninsula (peninsula, Asia)

    Arabia, peninsular region, together with offshore islands, located in the extreme southwestern corner of Asia. The Arabian Peninsula is bounded by the Red Sea on the west and southwest, the Gulf of Aden on the south, the Arabian Sea on the south and southeast, and the Gulf of Oman and the Persian

  • Arabian Platform (geological region, Asia)

    Turkey: The Arabian platform: Southeastern Turkey between Gaziantep and the Tigris (Dicle) River rests on a stable massif called the Arabian platform. It is characterized by relatively gentle relief, with broad plateau surfaces descending to the south from about 2,500 feet (760 metres) at the mountain foot…

  • Arabian religion (ancient religion)

    Arabian religion, beliefs of Arabia comprising the polytheistic beliefs and practices that existed before the rise of Islām in the 7th century ad. Arabia is here understood in the broad sense of the term to include the confines of the Syrian desert. The religion of Palmyra, which belongs to the

  • Arabian Sea (sea, Indian Ocean)

    Arabian Sea, northwestern part of the Indian Ocean, covering a total area of about 1,491,000 square miles (3,862,000 square km) and forming part of the principal sea route between Europe and India. It is bounded to the west by the Horn of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, to the north by Iran and

  • Arabian Shield (geology)

    continental shield: The African Shield, sometimes called the Ethiopian Shield, extends eastward to include western Saudi Arabia and the eastern half of Madagascar.

  • Arabian starflower (plant)

    Ornithogalum: Star-of-Bethlehem (Ornithogalum umbellatum) and Arabian starflower (O. arabicum) are common garden ornamentals grown for their attractive star-shaped flowers.

  • Arabian tahr (mammal)

    tahr: The Arabian tahr (H. jayakari) is the smallest of the three species; an adult male weighs about 40 kg (90 pounds), while females are 17–20 kg (37–44 pounds). It is gray brown (females and subadult males) or blonde (fully adult males), with a brittle, relatively short…

  • Arabian-Indian Ridge (submarine ridge, Arabian Sea)

    Carlsberg Ridge, submarine ridge of the Arabian Sea and the Indian Ocean. The ridge is a portion of the Mid-Indian Ridge and extends from near Rodrigues Island to the Gulf of Aden, trending basically northwest to southeast. The ridge separates the Arabian Sea to the northeast from the Somali Basin

  • Arabian-Iranian sedimentary basin

    petroleum: Oil fields: The Arabian-Iranian sedimentary basin in the Persian Gulf region contains two-thirds of these supergiant fields. The remaining supergiants are distributed among the United States, Russia, Mexico, Libya, Algeria, Venezuela, China, and Brazil.

  • Arabian-Nubian Massif (geology)

    continental shield: The African Shield, sometimes called the Ethiopian Shield, extends eastward to include western Saudi Arabia and the eastern half of Madagascar.

  • Arabian-Nubian Shield (geology)

    continental shield: The African Shield, sometimes called the Ethiopian Shield, extends eastward to include western Saudi Arabia and the eastern half of Madagascar.

  • Arabic (ship)

    World War I: The war at sea, 1914–15: …on August 17, sank the Arabic, which also had U.S. and other neutral passengers. Following a new U.S. protest, the Germans undertook to ensure the safety of passengers before sinking liners henceforth; but only after the torpedoing of yet another liner, the Hesperia, did Germany, on September 18, decide to…

  • Arabic alphabet

    Arabic alphabet, Arabic alphabet and numerals.second most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world (the Latin alphabet is the most widespread). Originally developed for writing the Arabic language and carried across much of the Eastern Hemisphere by the spread of Islam, the Arabic script

  • Arabic Infancy Gospel (apocrypha)

    Christianity: Messianic secrets and the mysteries of salvation: The First Gospel of the Infancy of Jesus (known also as the Arabic Infancy Gospel), for example, recounts that, one day, Jesus and his playmates were playing on a rooftop and one fell down and died. The other playmates ran away, leaving Jesus accused of pushing…

  • Arabic language

    Arabic language, Southern-Central Semitic language spoken in a large area including North Africa, most of the Arabian Peninsula, and other parts of the Middle East. (See Afro-Asiatic languages.) Arabic is the language of the Qur?ān (or Koran, the sacred book of Islam) and the religious language of

  • Arabic Language Academy of Damascus (school, Damascus, Syria)

    Damascus: Cultural life: The prestigious Arabic Language Academy of Damascus (1919) is a bastion of Arabic language, working both to preserve and modernize the language. The National Museum, established in 1936, boasts an extraordinary collection of artifacts from across the country, representing six millennia of civilization. A military museum occupies…

  • Arabic literary renaissance (literary movement)

    Arabic literary renaissance, 19th-century movement to a modern Arabic literature, inspired by contacts with the West and a renewed interest in the great classical literature. After the Napoleonic invasion of Egypt (1798) and the subsequent establishment of an autonomous and Western-minded ruling

  • Arabic literature

    Arabic literature, the body of written works produced in the Arabic language. The tradition of Arabic literature stretches back some 16 centuries to unrecorded beginnings in the Arabian Peninsula. At certain points in the development of European civilization, the literary culture of Islam and its

  • Arabic number system (numeral system)

    Decimal, in mathematics, positional numeral system employing 10 as the base and requiring 10 different numerals, the digits 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. It also requires a dot (decimal point) to represent decimal fractions. In this scheme, the numerals used in denoting a number take different

  • Arabic numeral

    Hindu-Arabic numerals, set of 10 symbols—1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0—that represent numbers in the decimal number system. They originated in India in the 6th or 7th century and were introduced to Europe through the writings of Middle Eastern mathematicians, especially al-Khwarizmi and al-Kindi,

  • Arabic philosophy

    Arabic philosophy, Doctrines of the Arabic philosophers of the 9th–12th century who influenced medieval Scholasticism in Europe. The Arabic tradition combines Aristotelianism and Neoplatonism with other ideas introduced through Islam. Influential thinkers include the Persians al-Kindi, al-Farabi,

  • Arabis (plant)

    Rock cress, (genus Arabis), genus of some 120 species of herbs belonging to the mustard family (Brassicaceae), found throughout the Northern Hemisphere and in mountainous areas of Africa. Rock cresses are often erect or mound-forming and bear characteristic long, narrow seedpods, called siliques.

  • Arabis caucasica (plant)

    rock cress: Wall rock cress, or garden arabis (Arabis caucasica), is a perennial from southeastern Europe. It reaches 30 cm (1 foot) in height and bears fragrant white flowers in early spring; it has double, pink, dwarf, and variegated varieties. Alpine rock cress (A. alpina) also produces…

  • Arabiya News, Al (Pan-Arab satellite television channel)

    Al Arabiya, Arabic-language satellite television channel, based in Dubai, established in March 2003. The company was founded by the brother-in-law of Saudi Arabia’s King Fahd, with additional investment from Lebanon’s Hariri Group and investors from Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and other Gulf countries.

  • Arabiya, Al (Pan-Arab satellite television channel)

    Al Arabiya, Arabic-language satellite television channel, based in Dubai, established in March 2003. The company was founded by the brother-in-law of Saudi Arabia’s King Fahd, with additional investment from Lebanon’s Hariri Group and investors from Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and other Gulf countries.

  • ?Arabīyah as-Sūrīyah, al-Jumhūrīyah al-

    Syria, country located on the east coast of the Mediterranean Sea in southwestern Asia. Its area includes territory in the Golan Heights that has been occupied by Israel since 1967. The present area does not coincide with ancient Syria, which was the strip of fertile land lying between the eastern

  • ?Arabiyyah (people)

    Arab, one whose native language is Arabic. (See also Arabic language.) Before the spread of Islam and, with it, the Arabic language, Arab referred to any of the largely nomadic Semitic inhabitants of the Arabian Peninsula. In modern usage, it embraces any of the Arabic-speaking peoples living in

  • Arabization (culture)

    Algeria: Languages: Algeria’s official policy of “Arabization” since independence, which aims to promote indigenous Arabic and Islamic cultural values throughout society, has resulted in the replacement of French by Arabic as the national medium and, in particular, as the primary language of instruction in primary and secondary schools. Some Amazigh groups…

  • arable farming (agriculture)

    Africa: Agriculture: …a lack of integration between crop production and animal husbandry. Traditionally, sedentary cultivators like the Hausa in Nigeria and the Kikuyu in Kenya live apart from their nomadic herdsmen neighbours (the Fulani and Maasai, respectively), with the result that over large areas of the continent farmers do not have access…

  • Aracaju (Brazil)

    Aracaju, port city and state capital, east-central Sergipe estado (state), northeastern Brazil. It lies on the Continguiba River at the base of a ridge of sand hills 6 miles (10 km) from the coast. The city, which was founded in 1855 as a new state capital, is laid out in an unusual grid pattern.

  • Aracanidae (fish)

    boxfish: …to the boxfishes are the keeled boxfishes of the family Aracanidae. These fishes also have a carapace, but there is a keel along the underside and openings behind the dorsal and anal fins. The members of this group are found from Japan to Australia.

  • Aracari (bird)

    Aracari, any of certain toucan species. See

  • aracari (bird)

    Aracari, any of certain toucan species. See

  • Aracati (city, Brazil)

    Aracati, city, northeastern Ceará estado (state), northeastern Brazil. It lies at the mouth of the Jaguaribe River, about 12 miles (19 km) from the Atlantic Ocean. It was founded in 1747. The city exports cotton, carnauba wax, and salt. Manufactures include textiles and rubber products. There are

  • Ara?atuba (Brazil)

    Ara?atuba, city, western S?o Paulo estado (state), Brazil. It lies near the Tietê River, which is dammed for power and irrigation. The city was founded in 1908 and was given town rank in 1917. In 1921 it was separated administratively from Penápolis (to the southeast) and was designated the seat of

  • Araceae (plant family)

    angiosperm: Inflorescences: …fleshy spike characteristic of the Araceae is called a spadix, and the underlying bract is known as a spathe. A catkin (or ament) is a spike in which all the flowers are of only one sex, either staminate or carpellate. The catkin is usually pendulous, and the petals and sepals…

  • arachidic acid (chemical compound)

    carboxylic acid: Unsaturated aliphatic acids: …the saturated stearic (C18) and arachidic (C20) acids, which are solids. The reason is that the regular nature of the saturated hydrocarbon chains allows the molecules in the solid to stack in a close parallel arrangement, while the presence of cis double bonds in the unsaturated hydrocarbon chains breaks up…

  • arachidonic acid (chemical compound)

    carboxylic acid: Unsaturated aliphatic acids: Arachidonic acid is important because the human body uses it as a starting material in the synthesis of two kinds of essential substances, the prostaglandins and the leukotrienes, both of which are also unsaturated carboxylic acids. Examples are PGE2 (a prostaglandin) and LTB4 (a leukotriene).…

  • Arachis hypogaea (plant)

    Peanut, (Arachis hypogaea), legume of the pea family (Fabaceae), grown for its edible seeds. Native to tropical South America, the peanut was at an early time introduced to the Old World tropics. The seeds are a nutritionally dense food, rich in protein and fat. Despite its several common names,

  • Arachne (Greek mythology)

    Arachne, (Greek: “Spider”) in Greek mythology, the daughter of Idmon of Colophon in Lydia, a dyer in purple. Arachne was a weaver who acquired such skill in her art that she ventured to challenge Athena, goddess of war, handicraft, and practical reason. Athena wove a tapestry depicting the gods in

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