You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Apatosaurus (dinosaur genus)

    Apatosaurus, (genus Apatosaurus), giant herbivorous sauropod dinosaur, one of the largest land animals of all time, that lived between 147 million and 137 million years ago during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous periods. Its fossil remains are found in North America and Europe. Apatosaurus

  • Apatow, Judd (American writer, director, and producer)

    Judd Apatow, American writer, director, and producer known for creating offbeat comedies featuring unconventional protagonists. Apatow was a self-described awkward, undersized child who was always picked last for school sports teams. He was deeply scarred as a youth by his parents’ divorce, and his

  • Apaturia (Greek religious festival)

    Apaturia, Greek religious festival that was held annually in nearly all the Ionian towns. At Athens it took place in the month of Pyanopsion (October–November) and lasted three days, on which occasion the various phratries (clans) of Attica met to discuss their affairs. The name probably means the

  • Apatzingán (Mexico)

    Apatzingán, city, west-central Michoacán estado (state), west-central Mexico. It lies along the Apatzingán (Acahuato) River, 176 miles (283 km) southwest of Morelia, the state capital. Its name commemorates the signing there in 1814 of the Constitution of Apatzingán by the congress called by the

  • Apatzingán de la Constitución (Mexico)

    Apatzingán, city, west-central Michoacán estado (state), west-central Mexico. It lies along the Apatzingán (Acahuato) River, 176 miles (283 km) southwest of Morelia, the state capital. Its name commemorates the signing there in 1814 of the Constitution of Apatzingán by the congress called by the

  • Apatzingán, Constitution of (Mexico [1814])

    Apatzingán: …there in 1814 of the Constitution of Apatzingán by the congress called by the revolutionary leader José María Morelos to declare Mexican independence. The city links the sparsely inhabited southern and densely populated central portions of Michoacán. Although the climate is hot and semiarid, the agricultural and pastoral hinterland is…

  • Apausha (Iranian demon)

    Apausha, in ancient Iranian religion, a demonic star who in an important myth does battle with Tishtrya over

  • apavarga (Indian religion)

    Moksha, in Indian philosophy and religion, liberation from the cycle of death and rebirth (samsara). Derived from the Sanskrit word muc (“to free”), the term moksha literally means freedom from samsara. This concept of liberation or release is shared by a wide spectrum of religious traditions,

  • APBA (sports game)

    baseball: Fantasy baseball: …entrepreneur Dick Seitz, known as APBA (American Professional Baseball Association). A similar game called Strat-o-matic first appeared in the 1960s. Having purchased the APBA or Strat-o-matic board game, players annually ordered cards that listed the statistical data for the ballplayers from the prior season. A combination of data given on…

  • APC (political party, Paraguay)

    Paraguay: Paraguay in the 21st century: …Lugo of the centre-left coalition Patriotic Alliance for Change (Alianza Patriótica para el Cambio; APC) defeated Blanca Ovelar of the Colorado Party, ending that party’s 62 years of continuous rule.

  • APC (political party, Sierra Leone)

    Sierra Leone: Constitutional framework: …one-party republic based on the All People’s Congress; the head of state, or executive president, was elected by delegates of the All People’s Congress, and there was a parliament. Mounting political pressures and violence resulted in the adoption of a new constitution in 1991 that established a multiparty system. However,…

  • APC (biology)

    prostate cancer: Treatment: …based on the collection of antigen-presenting cells (APCs; a type of immune cell) from the patient’s blood using a procedure known as leukapheresis (the separation of leukocytes, or white blood cells, from other blood components). The APCs are then cultured in a laboratory, where they are grown in the presence…

  • APC (gene)

    tumour suppressor gene: …in the tumour suppressor gene APC.

  • APC system

    mobile telephone: Airborne cellular systems: …known by the generic name aeronautical public correspondence (APC) systems, are of two types: terrestrial-based, in which telephone calls are placed directly from an aircraft to an en route ground station; and satellite-based, in which telephone calls are relayed via satellite to a ground station. In the United States the…

  • APD (electronics)

    telecommunications media: Optoelectronic receivers: …positive-intrinsic-negative (PIN) photodiode and the avalanche photodiode (APD). These optical receivers extract the baseband signal from a modulated optical carrier signal by converting incident optical power into electric current. The PIN photodiode has low gain but very fast response; the APD has high gain but slower response.

  • APDS (shell)

    artillery: Antitank guns: In 1944 Britain perfected “discarding-sabot” projectiles, in which a tungsten core was supported in a conventional gun by a light metal sabot that split and fell free after leaving the muzzle, allowing the core to fly on at extremely high velocity.

  • ape (mammal)

    Ape, (superfamily Hominoidea), any tailless primate of the families Hylobatidae (gibbons) and Hominidae (chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, gorillas, and human beings). Apes are found in the tropical forests of western and central Africa and Southeast Asia. Apes are distinguished from monkeys by the

  • Ape (Italian caricaturist)

    Carlo Pellegrini, caricaturist notable for his portraits of prominent Englishmen appearing in Vanity Fair. As a young man, he was a part of Neapolitan society, whose members he caricatured in a good-natured way. Following an unhappy love affair and the death of a sister, he went to England in 1864

  • Ape and Essence (novel by Huxley)

    novel: Fantasy and prophecy: …earlier novel and of his Ape and Essence (1948) remain more convincing. Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-four (1949) showed a world in which a tyrannic unity is imposed by a collective solipsism, and contradictions are liquidated through the constant revision of history that the controlling party decrees. Anthony Burgess’ Clockwork Orange

  • Ape Cave (cave, Washington, United States)

    cave: Other types of lava caves: 4 kilometres) is Ape Cave on the flank of Mount St. Helens in Washington. The cave is located on the side of the volcano opposite that involved in the catastrophic eruption of 1980 and so survived the outburst. Ape Cave is only one fragment of a series of…

  • Ape, The (film by Franco [2005])

    James Franco: Other work: …his first of numerous films, The Ape and Fool’s Gold. He also cowrote and appeared in both movies, as he would for many of his directorial efforts. He later helmed the Hart Crane biopic The Broken Tower (2011) and adaptations (2013, 2014) of William Faulkner’s novels As I Lay Dying…

  • APEC (international organization)

    Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), organization that seeks to promote free trade and economic cooperation throughout the Asia-Pacific region. Established in 1989 in response to the growing interdependence of Asia-Pacific economies and the advent of regional economic blocs (such as the

  • apeiron (Greek philosophy)

    Anaximander: …that everything originated from the apeiron (the “infinite,” “unlimited,” or “indefinite”), rather than from a particular element, such as water (as Thales had held). Anaximander postulated eternal motion, along with the apeiron, as the originating cause of the world. This (probably rotary) motion caused opposites, such as hot and cold,…

  • Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    Apeldoorn, gemeente (municipality), east-central Netherlands. It lies east of the sandy and wooded Veluwe Hills, on the edge of the Soeren (Suren) Forest. Noted traditionally for its many gardens, paper mills, and laundries, Apeldoorn is a residential and industrial town that manufactures

  • apella (Greek history)

    Apella, ancient Spartan assembly, corresponding to the ekklēsia of other Greek states. Its monthly meetings, probably restricted to full citizens over 30, were presided over at first by the kings, later by ephors (magistrates). Not empowered to initiate proposals, the body considered subjects

  • Apelles (Greek painter)

    Apelles, early Hellenistic Greek painter whose work was held in such high esteem by ancient writers on art that he continues to be regarded, even though none of his work survives, as the greatest painter of antiquity. Almost as little is known of Apelles’ life as of his art. He was of Ionian origin

  • Apellicon of Teos (Greek librarian)

    Apellicon Of Teos, a wealthy Greek book collector, who became an Athenian citizen. He had bought from the descendants of Neleus of Scepsis in the Troad the libraries of Aristotle and Theophrastus, which were in a damaged condition but might have contained the only copies of the Aristotelian

  • Apennine orogeny (geology)

    Apennine Range: Geology: The Apennine orogeny developed through several tectonic phases, mostly during the Cenozoic Era (i.e., since about 65 million years ago), and came to a climax in the Miocene and Pliocene epochs (about 23 to 2.6 million years ago). The Apennines consist of a thrust-belt structure with…

  • Apennine Range (mountains, Italy)

    Apennine Range, series of mountain ranges bordered by narrow coastlands that form the physical backbone of peninsular Italy. From Cadibona Pass in the northwest, close to the Maritime Alps, they form a great arc, which extends as far as the Egadi Islands to the west of Sicily. Their total length is

  • Apennines, Abruzzese (mountains, Italy)

    Europe: Elevations: …feet [2,912 metres]) in the Abruzzi Apennines, Bobotov Kuk (8,274 feet [2,522 metres]) in the Dinaric Alps, Mount Botev (7,795 feet [2,376 metres]) in the Balkan Mountains, Gerlachovsky Peak (Gerlach; 8,711 feet [2,655 metres]) in the Western Carpathians, and Mount

  • Apenrade (Denmark)

    ?benr?, city, southeastern Jutland, Denmark, at the head of ?benr? Fjord. First mentioned in the 12th century when attacked by the Wends, it was granted a charter (1335) and grew from a fishing village into a thriving port in the 17th and 18th centuries. Medieval landmarks include the St. Nicholas

  • Apep (Egyptian god)

    Apopis, ancient Egyptian demon of chaos, who had the form of a serpent and, as the foe of the sun god, Re, represented all that was outside the ordered cosmos. Although many serpents symbolized divinity and royalty, Apopis threatened the underworld and symbolized evil. Each night Apopis encountered

  • Apepi (Egyptian god)

    Apopis, ancient Egyptian demon of chaos, who had the form of a serpent and, as the foe of the sun god, Re, represented all that was outside the ordered cosmos. Although many serpents symbolized divinity and royalty, Apopis threatened the underworld and symbolized evil. Each night Apopis encountered

  • Aper (Roman prefect)

    Diocletian: Rise to power: …adoptive father, the praetorian prefect Aper, was accused of having killed him in order to seize power. When Diocletian, acclaimed as emperor by his soldiers, appeared for the first time in public dressed in the imperial purple, he declared himself innocent of Numerian’s murder. He designated Aper as the criminal…

  • aperitif (alcoholic beverage)

    wine: Flavoured wines: Aperitif wines, usually taken before meals, are made by adding quinine and other ingredients to sweet, heavy wines. In France they are marketed under such brand names as Byrrh, Dubonnet, Lillet, and Saint Rapha?l; in Italy they include Campari and Punt e Mes.

  • Apert syndrome (congenital disorder)

    Acrocephalosyndactyly, congenital malformation of the skeleton affecting the skull and limbs. The disorder most often is hereditary, but it may appear spontaneously. The head appears pointed (acrocephaly) because of premature closing of the cranial sutures between the individual bones that make up

  • aperture (shell structure)

    gastropod: The shell: …the last whorl is the aperture, or opening. The shell is secreted along the outer lip of the aperture by the fleshy part of the animal called the mantle, first by outward additions to the shell lip and then by secretion of inner thickening layers. The outer layer, or periostracum,…

  • aperture (optics)

    Aperture, in optics, the maximum diameter of a light beam that can pass through an optical system. The size of an aperture is limited by the size of the mount holding the optical component, or the size of the diaphragm placed in the bundle of light rays. The hole in the mount or diaphragm that

  • aperture grille (electronics)

    television: Shadow masks and aperture grilles: …different type of mask, the aperture grille, was introduced in the Sony Corporation’s Trinitron tube. In Trinitron-type tubes the shadow-mask is replaced by a metal grille having short vertical slots extending from the top to the bottom of the screen (see the figure). The three electron beams pass through the…

  • aperture stop (optics)

    aperture: …the aperture is called an aperture stop. Thus, an aperture stop determines the amount of light that traverses an optical system and hence determines the image illumination.

  • aperture synthesis (optics)

    radio telescope: Radio interferometry and aperture synthesis: The angular resolution, or ability of a radio telescope to distinguish fine detail in the sky, depends on the wavelength of observations divided by the size of the instrument. Yet even the largest antennas, when used at their shortest operating wavelength, have an…

  • Apes of God, The (work by Lewis)

    Wyndham Lewis: …London with a satirical novel, The Apes of God, in which he scourged wealthy dilettantes.

  • Apet (ancient Egyptian goddess)

    Taurt: Another goddess, called Opet (or Apet), was depicted in the same form.

  • Apex (missile)

    rocket and missile system: Air-to-air: The AA-7 Apex, a Sparrow equivalent, and the AA-8 Aphid, a relatively small missile for close-in use, were introduced during the 1970s. Both used semiactive radar guidance, though the Aphid was apparently produced in an infrared-homing version as well. The long-range, semiactive radar-guided AA-9 Amos appeared…

  • apex (astronomy)

    Milky Way Galaxy: Solar motion calculations from space motions: …reference frame is called the apex of solar motion. In addition, the calculation of the solar motion provides dispersion in velocity. Such dispersions are as intrinsically interesting as the solar motions themselves because a dispersion is an indication of the integrity of the selection of stars used as a reference…

  • apex (plant anatomy)

    root: Morphology and growth: …the root cap lies the apical meristem, a tissue of actively dividing cells. Some of the cells produced by the apical meristem are added to the root cap, but most of them are added to the region of elongation, which lies just above the meristematic region. It is in the…

  • apex beat (physiology)

    heart: …with heartbeat, is called the apex beat. It is caused by pressure exerted on the chest wall at the outset of systole by the rounded and hardened ventricular wall.

  • Apex chert (rock deposit, Western Australia, Australia)

    Precambrian: Microfossils and stromatolites: …on Earth, comes from the Apex chert deposit in Western Australia. The chert dates to 3.47 billion years ago and holds at least five species of microfossils. Some of these species were early photosynthesizers, whereas others had metabolic processes that relied on methane cycling. Such diversity suggests that the first…

  • apex predator (ecology)

    mesopredator release: …lotor), are typically outcompeted by top carnivores, such as wolves (Canis lupus) and cougars (Puma concolor). for food and other resources. Because top carnivores are also capable of killing and eating them, mesopredators often avoid areas claimed by top carnivores or alter their hunting and foraging patterns to reduce the…

  • APFA (American sports organization)

    National Football League (NFL), major U.S. professional gridiron football organization, founded in 1920 in Canton, Ohio, as the American Professional Football Association. Its first president was Jim Thorpe, an outstanding American athlete who was also a player in the league. The present name was

  • APFSDS (ammunition)

    tank: Ammunition: …began to be superseded by armour-piercing, fin-stabilized, discarding-sabot (APFSDS) ammunition. These projectiles had long-rod penetrator cores of tungsten alloy or depleted uranium; they could be fired with muzzle velocities of 1,650 metres (5,400 feet) per second or more, making them capable of perforating much thicker armour than all earlier types…

  • APG II (botanical classification system)

    angiosperm: It is known as the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group IV (APG IV) botanical classification system. The angiosperms came to be considered a group at the division level (comparable to the phylum level in animal classification systems) called Anthophyta, though the APG system recognizes only informal groups above the level of order.

  • APG III (botanical classification system)

    angiosperm: Annotated classification: …update in 2009 known as APG III, and into another revision in 2016 known as APG IV. The synopsis of flowering-plant classification presented here follows the APG IV system. It is important to recognize that modifications to the APG IV system continue as new data become available.

  • APG IV (botanical classification system)

    angiosperm: It is known as the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group IV (APG IV) botanical classification system. The angiosperms came to be considered a group at the division level (comparable to the phylum level in animal classification systems) called Anthophyta, though the APG system recognizes only informal groups above the level of order.

  • Apgar score (medicine)

    Apgar Score System, medical rating procedure developed in 1952 by American anesthesiologist Virginia Apgar to evaluate the condition of newborn infants and to identify those that require life-sustaining medical assistance, such as resuscitation. The Apgar score is a qualitative measurement of a

  • Apgar Score System (medicine)

    Apgar Score System, medical rating procedure developed in 1952 by American anesthesiologist Virginia Apgar to evaluate the condition of newborn infants and to identify those that require life-sustaining medical assistance, such as resuscitation. The Apgar score is a qualitative measurement of a

  • Apgar, Virginia (American physician)

    Virginia Apgar, American physician, anesthesiologist, and medical researcher who developed the Apgar Score System, a method of evaluating an infant shortly after birth to assess its well-being and to determine if any immediate medical intervention is required. Apgar graduated from Mount Holyoke

  • Aphaea (Greek deity)

    Britomartis: …Greeks also identified her with Aphaea, a primitive local goddess of Aegina whose temple there is famous for its pedimental sculptures.

  • Aphaea, Temple of (ancient temple, Aegina, Greece)

    Aegina: A well-preserved 5th-century-bce temple to Aphaea, the ancient Aeginetan deity related to the Cretan Britomartis (Artemis), is situated on a wooded crest in the east of the island. Its Doric peripheral construction (having columns surrounding the building) of local gray limestone has been partially restored.

  • aphagia (physiology)

    motivation: Hunger: …lack of eating known as aphagia, as well as a lack of drinking, or adipsia. It was assumed that these two areas share in the control of hunger motivation by activating and deactivating hunger as glucose levels within the blood change. It was further assumed that the specialized cells (glucoreceptors)…

  • Aphaia (Greek deity)

    Britomartis: …Greeks also identified her with Aphaea, a primitive local goddess of Aegina whose temple there is famous for its pedimental sculptures.

  • Aphandra natalia (tree species)

    palm: Economic importance: …and a fibre palm (Aphandra natalia). In Southeast Asia the production of rattan from species of Calamus (C. caesius, C. manan, and C. trachycoleus) is a promising industry. Commercial production of sago from trunks of Metroxylon has been investigated. Palms are sources of many products; indeed, no other plant…

  • aphanitic texture (geology)

    rock: Classification by grain or crystal size: Aphanitic is a descriptive term for small crystals, and phaneritic for larger ones. Very coarse crystals (those larger than 3 centimetres, or 1.2 inches) are termed pegmatitic.

  • Aphanomyces (chromist genus)

    Aphanomyces, genus of parasitic funguslike organisms in the class Oomycetes (phylum Oomycota, kingdom Chromista). Many are responsible for a variety of plant diseases, including Aphanomyces euteiches, which causes root rot of English peas, and A. cochlioides, which is the causative agent of root

  • Aphanomyces euteiches (chromist)

    Aphanomyces: …variety of plant diseases, including Aphanomyces euteiches, which causes root rot of English peas, and A. cochlioides, which is the causative agent of root rot in sugar beets.

  • aphasia (pathology)

    Aphasia, defect in the expression and comprehension of language caused by damage to the temporal and the frontal lobes of the brain. Aphasia can be caused by a head injury, a tumour, a stroke, or an infection. Symptoms vary with the location and extent of the brain tissues involved. Damage to the

  • Aphek (ancient city, Israel)

    Aphek, Canaanite royal city near the present-day Israeli city of Peta? Tiqwa. Situated near the headwaters of the Yarqon River, the city is the most significant of several places called Aphek (Hebrew, ?afik, “riverbed”) in the Hebrew Bible. Conquered by Joshua (Joshua 12:18), it became a Philistine

  • Aphelandra (plant genus)

    Acanthaceae: (350), Barleria (300), Aphelandra (170), Staurogyne (140), Dicliptera (150), Blepharis (130), Lepidagathis (100), Hygrophila (100), Thunbergia (90), and Dyschoriste (80). The small genus Avicennia

  • aphelion (astronomy)

    Aphelion, in astronomy, the point in the orbit of a planet or comet most distant from the sun. When the Earth is at its aphelion in early July, it is about 4,800,000 km (3,000,000 miles) farther from the sun than when at its perihelion in early January. Corresponding terms for describing the most

  • Aphelocoma californica (bird)

    jay: …coerulescens), found in Florida; the western scrub jay (A. californica), found throughout western North America; and the island scrub jay (A. insularis), found only on Santa Cruz Island, off the coast of California. They are locally called “blue jays,” but they lack the crests of C. cristata.

  • Aphelocoma coerulescens (bird)

    jay: …are now classified as the Florida scrub jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens), found in Florida; the western scrub jay (A. californica), found throughout western North America; and the island scrub jay (A. insularis), found only on Santa Cruz Island, off the coast of California. They are locally called “blue jays,” but they…

  • Aphelocoma insularis (bird)

    jay: …western North America; and the island scrub jay (A. insularis), found only on Santa Cruz Island, off the coast of California. They are locally called “blue jays,” but they lack the crests of C. cristata.

  • apheresis (medical procedure)

    bone marrow transplant: Collection of donor stem cells: …marrow donor are collected using apheresis. During this procedure, blood is drawn from one arm and passes through a machine that collects the stem cells. The remaining portion of the blood is then returned to the donor via a catheter inserted in the arm opposite the one from which the…

  • Aphid (missile)

    rocket and missile system: Air-to-air: …a Sparrow equivalent, and the AA-8 Aphid, a relatively small missile for close-in use, were introduced during the 1970s. Both used semiactive radar guidance, though the Aphid was apparently produced in an infrared-homing version as well. The long-range, semiactive radar-guided AA-9 Amos appeared in the mid-1980s; it was associated with…

  • aphid (insect)

    Aphid, (family Aphididae), any of a group of sap-sucking, soft-bodied insects (order Homoptera) that are about the size of a pinhead, most species of which have a pair of tubelike projections (cornicles) on the abdomen. Aphids can be serious plant pests and may stunt plant growth, produce plant

  • Aphididae (insect)

    Aphid, (family Aphididae), any of a group of sap-sucking, soft-bodied insects (order Homoptera) that are about the size of a pinhead, most species of which have a pair of tubelike projections (cornicles) on the abdomen. Aphids can be serious plant pests and may stunt plant growth, produce plant

  • aphidlion (insect larva)

    lacewing: The larva, often called an aphidlion, has prominent sucking mouthparts and well-developed legs. These capture and drain body fluids from aphids and other soft-bodied insects. After about two weeks of continuous feeding, the larva spins a silken, pearl-sized cocoon on the underside of a leaf and remains in the pupal…

  • aphin (biochemistry)

    coloration: Polycyclic quinones: …more interesting representatives is the aphin group, so called because of their initial recovery from the hemolymph (circulating fluid) of several coloured species of aphids; aphids parasitize plants, as do the other quinone-assimilating insects.

  • Aphis forbesi (insect)

    homopteran: Associations with other insects: The strawberry root louse has a sexual cycle in which eggs are laid, but these aphids are dependent upon ants for survival. The ants not only care for the eggs in their nests but they also carry the young aphids from plant to plant. In some…

  • Aphis gossypii (insect)

    aphid: Types of aphids: …melon, or cotton, aphid (Aphis gossypii) is green to black. In warm climates live young are produced all year, while in cooler areas there is an egg stage. Among the dozens of possible hosts are melon, cotton, and cucumber. It is usually controlled by naturally occurring parasites and predators.

  • Aphis pomi (insect)

    aphid: Types of aphids: The apple aphid (Aphis pomi) is yellow-green with dark head and legs. It overwinters as a black egg on its only host, the apple tree. It produces honeydew that supports growth of a sooty mold.

  • Aphobus (guardian of Demosthenes)

    Demosthenes: Heritage and youth: His lawsuits against Aphobus and two other guardians in 363 were more successful; they produced little money, but he learned much about speaking strategy and methods of argument. Three of his speeches against Aphobus and two against the sculptor Antenor have survived.

  • aphonia (pathology)

    speech: Substitutes for the larynx: …is without a voice (aphonic) and becomes effectively speechless; the faint smacking noises made by the remaining oral structures for articulation are practically unintelligible. This type of pseudo-whispering through buccal (mouth) speech is discouraged to help the patient later relearn useful speech on his own. A frequently successful method…

  • Aphonopelma (spider genus)

    tarantula: …States, species of the genus Aphonopelma can attain a body length up to 5 cm (almost 2 inches) and a leg span up to 12.5 cm (almost 5 inches). The spiders, dark in colour and sluggish in movement, have a hairy body and hairy legs. The most common member of…

  • Aphonopelma californicum (spider)

    tarantula: …member of that genus is A. californicum (Eurypelma californicum; sometimes E. californica), which is found in California, Texas, and Arizona. A 30-year life span has been recorded for one individual of that species.

  • aphorism (statement)

    Aphorism, a concise expression of doctrine or principle or any generally accepted truth conveyed in a pithy, memorable statement. Aphorisms have been especially used in dealing with subjects that were late in developing their own principles or methodology—for example, art, agriculture, medicine,

  • Aphorismi (work attributed to Hippocrates)

    aphorism: …was first used in the Aphorisms of Hippocrates, a long series of propositions concerning the symptoms and diagnosis of disease and the art of healing and medicine. The first aphorism, which serves as a kind of introduction to the book, runs as follows:

  • Aphorisms (work attributed to Hippocrates)

    aphorism: …was first used in the Aphorisms of Hippocrates, a long series of propositions concerning the symptoms and diagnosis of disease and the art of healing and medicine. The first aphorism, which serves as a kind of introduction to the book, runs as follows:

  • aphotic zone (oceanography)

    inland water ecosystem: Population and community development and structure: …in both the photic and aphotic zones. In the aphotic zone, also called the tropholytic zone, the consumption of energy exceeds its production. The zones are demarcated by a plane of compensation at which primary production and consumption are equivalent. This plane varies diurnally and seasonally with changes in light…

  • Aphraates (Syrian ascetic)

    Aphraates, Syrian ascetic and the earliest-known Christian writer of the Syriac church in Persia. Aphraates became a convert to Christianity during the reign of the anti-Christian Persian king Shāpūr II (309–379), after which he led a monastic life, possibly at the Monastery of St. Matthew near

  • Aphredoderus sayanus (fish)

    Pirate perch, (Aphredoderus sayanus), freshwater fish that is the sole member of the family Aphredoderidae. The pirate perch is found in weedy or muddy creeks, rivers, and lakes of eastern North America. Noteworthy is the peculiar position of its anus, which is located near the anal fin when the

  • Aphrem Syrus, Saint (Christian theologian)

    Saint Ephraem Syrus, ; Western feast day June 9, Eastern feast day January 28), Christian theologian, poet, hymnist, and doctor of the church who, as doctrinal consultant to Eastern churchmen, composed numerous theological-biblical commentaries and polemical works that, in witnessing to the common

  • Aphriza virgata (bird)

    Surfbird, (Aphriza virgata), American shorebird that has a black triangle on its otherwise white tail. Surfbirds are about 25 centimetres (10 inches) long. With the knots, they constitute the subfamily Calidritinae (family Scolopacidae). Surfbirds breed in rock fields at high elevations in the

  • aphrodisiac (sexual stimulant)

    Aphrodisiac, any of various forms of stimulation thought to arouse sexual excitement. Aphrodisiacs may be classified in two principal groups: (1) psychophysiological (visual, tactile, olfactory, aural) and (2) internal (stemming from food, alcoholic drinks, drugs, love potions, medical

  • aphrodisiac pheromone (biochemistry)

    chemoreception: Aphrodisiac pheromones: The males of some insects produce aphrodisiac pheromones that induce females to mate once the two sexes have come together. One of the most remarkable and fully understood examples of this concerns monarch butterflies (although not the well-known North American monarch). Males of…

  • Aphrodisias (ancient city, Turkey)

    Aphrodisias, ancient city of the Caria region of southwestern Asia Minor (Anatolia, or modern Turkey), situated on a plateau south of the Maeander River (modern Büyük Menderes). Remains of an Ionic temple of Aphrodite and of a stadium and portions of a bathhouse have long been evident, but,

  • Aphrodita (annelid)

    Sea mouse, (Aphrodita), any of a genus of marine worms of the class Polychaeta (phylum Annelida), named for their mouselike appearance and behaviour. Sea mice are usually 7.5–15 centimetres (3–6 inches) long; however, some attain a length of 30 centimetres (12 inches). The slightly arched back is

  • Aphrodita aculeata (annelid)

    Sea mouse, (Aphrodita), any of a genus of marine worms of the class Polychaeta (phylum Annelida), named for their mouselike appearance and behaviour. Sea mice are usually 7.5–15 centimetres (3–6 inches) long; however, some attain a length of 30 centimetres (12 inches). The slightly arched back is

  • Aphrodite (Greek mythology)

    Aphrodite, ancient Greek goddess of sexual love and beauty, identified with Venus by the Romans. The Greek word aphros means “foam,” and Hesiod relates in his Theogony that Aphrodite was born from the white foam produced by the severed genitals of Uranus (Heaven), after his son Cronus threw them

  • Aphrodite Genetrix (sculpture by Callimachus)

    Callimachus: …have attributed to Callimachus the Venus Genetrix (or Aphrodite Genetrix), a Roman replica of which is in the Louvre. He has also been linked with a series of reliefs of dancing maenads, such as the Roman copy now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, which are notable…

Your preference has been recorded
Get a Premium membership for 30% off!
Save 30% with our Memorial Day Sale!
港台一级毛片免费观看