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  • anteroposterior axis (anatomy)

    symmetry: …axis is hence termed the oral-aboral, or anteroposterior, axis. Except in animals having an odd number of parts arranged in circular fashion (as in the five-armed starfishes), any plane passing through this axis will divide the animal into symmetrical halves. Animals having three, five, seven, etc., parts in a circle…

  • Anterosaur (dinosaur genus)

    Allosaurus, (genus Allosaurus), large carnivorous dinosaurs that lived from 150 million to 144 million years ago during the Late Jurassic Period; they are best known from fossils found in the western United States, particularly from the Cleveland-Lloyd Quarry in Utah and the Garden Park Quarry in

  • Anterus, Saint (pope)

    Saint Anterus, ; feast day January 3), pope for several weeks at the end of 235 and the beginning of 236. He was elected (possibly Nov. 21, 235) while St. Pontian, his predecessor, was condemned to the Sardinian mines. Anterus was soon prosecuted and sentenced to death. According to the Liber

  • Antes (people)

    Antae, federation of eastern Slavic nomadic tribes known by the 3rd century ad, dwelling in southern Russia between the Dnieper and Dniester rivers. A powerful people with highly developed agriculture, handicrafts, and ironwork, the Antae fought the Goths, who were fleeing westward from the Huns in

  • Antetokounmpo, Giannis (Greek basketball player)

    Milwaukee Bucks: …rapid development of versatile wing Giannis Antetokounmpo into stardom during the 2016–17 season propelled the Bucks back to the playoffs that season. Although Milwaukee improved with Antetokounmpo, the team’s management grew frustrated with Kidd’s coaching style, and Kidd was fired during the 2017–18 season, a campaign that ended with a…

  • Antev’s Altithermal (paleoclimatology)

    Holocene Epoch: Faunal change: …years ago (referred to as Antev’s Altithermal) and has ranged between that peak and the cold, wet conditions of the early Holocene since that time.

  • Antheil, Georg Johann Carl (American composer)

    George Antheil, American composer known for his ultramodern music in the 1920s. Antheil studied with Ernest Bloch in New York. In 1922 he went to Europe, gave piano recitals, and became prominent in the literary and artistic circles of the Parisian avant-garde. Antheil’s most celebrated work, Le

  • Antheil, George (American composer)

    George Antheil, American composer known for his ultramodern music in the 1920s. Antheil studied with Ernest Bloch in New York. In 1922 he went to Europe, gave piano recitals, and became prominent in the literary and artistic circles of the Parisian avant-garde. Antheil’s most celebrated work, Le

  • anthelmintic (drug)

    Anthelmintic, any drug that acts against infections caused by parasitic worms (helminths). Helminths can be divided into three groups: cestodes, or tapeworms; nematodes, or roundworms; and trematodes, or flukes. The helminths differ from other infectious organisms in that they have a complex body

  • anthem (music)

    Anthem, (Greek antiphōna: “against voice”; Old English antefn: “antiphon”), choral composition with English words, used in Anglican and other English-speaking church services. It developed in the mid-16th century in the Anglican Church as a musical form analogous to the Roman Catholic motet (q.v.),

  • anthemion (architecture)

    Anthemion, design consisting of a number of radiating petals, developed by the ancient Greeks from the Egyptian and Asiatic form known as the honeysuckle or lotus palmette. The anthemion was used widely by the Greeks and Romans to embellish various parts of ancient buildings. The Greeks originally

  • Anthemis (plant genus)

    chamomile: Many members of the genus Anthemis, containing more than 100 species of Eurasian herbs, are also known as chamomile. They characteristically have yellow or white ray flowers and yellow disk flowers in compact flower heads. Mayweed, or stinking chamomile (A. cotula), is a strong-smelling weed that has been used in…

  • Anthemis cotula (plant)

    chamomile: Mayweed, or stinking chamomile (A. cotula), is a strong-smelling weed that has been used in medicines and insecticides.

  • Anthemis nobilis (plant)

    chamomile: …Roman, chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile) or German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla). Several species are cultivated as garden ornamentals, especially golden marguerite, or yellow chamomile (Cota tinctoria).

  • Anthemis tinctoria (plant)

    chamomile: …cultivated as garden ornamentals, especially golden marguerite, or yellow chamomile (Cota tinctoria).

  • Anthemius (Roman emperor)

    Anthemius, Western Roman emperor who reigned from April 12, 467, to July 11, 472. The son-in-law of the Eastern emperor Marcian, Anthemius was appointed to his office by Marcian’s successor, Leo I, who wanted help in attacking the Vandals in North Africa. The powerful patrician Ricimer, kingmaker

  • Anthemius (Roman prefect)

    Theodosius II: At first the able Anthemius, praetorian prefect of the East, was regent for young Theodosius. Anthemius dropped out of sight in 414, when the emperor’s sister Pulcheria received the title augusta and assumed the regency. Throughout his reign, control of the government remained out of Theodosius’ hands.

  • Anthemius of Tralles (Byzantine architect)

    Hagia Sophia: …names of the building’s architects—Anthemius of Tralles and Isidorus of Miletus—are well known, as is their familiarity with mechanics and mathematics. The Hagia Sophia combines a longitudinal basilica and a centralized building in a wholly original manner, with a huge 32-metre (105-foot) main dome supported on pendentives and two…

  • anther (plant anatomy)

    angiosperm: The androecium: …terminal saclike structures (microsporangia) called anthers. The number of stamens comprised by the androecium is sometimes the same as the number of petals, but often the stamens are more numerous or fewer in number than the petals. There are generally two pairs of spore-containing sacs (microsporangia) in a young stamen;…

  • Antheraea assama (moth)

    saturniid moth: , A. assama for muga silk; the Chinese oak silkworm, A. pernyi, for shantung silk; and the Indian moth, A. paphia, for tussah silk. A Southeast Asian silk-producing species is the large atlas moth (Attacus atlas), whose wingspread often exceeds 25 cm (10 inches). The caterpillar…

  • Antheraea paphia (insect)

    saturniid moth: … for shantung silk; and the Indian moth, A. paphia, for tussah silk. A Southeast Asian silk-producing species is the large atlas moth (Attacus atlas), whose wingspread often exceeds 25 cm (10 inches). The caterpillar of the cynthia moth (Samia cynthia or walkeri), also known as the ailanthus silk moth, native…

  • Antheraea pernyi (insect)

    saturniid moth: assama for muga silk; the Chinese oak silkworm, A. pernyi, for shantung silk; and the Indian moth, A. paphia, for tussah silk. A Southeast Asian silk-producing species is the large atlas moth (Attacus atlas), whose wingspread often exceeds 25 cm (10 inches). The caterpillar of the cynthia moth (Samia cynthia…

  • Antheraea polyphemus (insect)

    saturniid moth: The larvae of the polyphemus moth (Antheraea polyphemus) are green with white lines and are marked by gold knobs; they feed on oak, maple, and birch leaves and pupate in a cocoon in a leaf on the ground. Antheraea species, including A. polyphemus, are sometimes used as a source…

  • antheridia (plant anatomy)

    plant reproductive system: The cellular basis: …the male gametangia are called antheridia and the female oogonia or archegonia. A female gametangium with a sterile cellular jacket is called an archegonium, although, like an oogonium, it produces eggs. In most of the plants dealt with in this article, the eggs are produced in archegonia and the sperms…

  • antheridiol (pheromone)

    steroid: Steroids of insects, fungi, and other organisms: …fungus Achlya bisexualis, the steroid antheridiol (12) of the female stimulates male gamete formation.

  • antheridium (plant anatomy)

    plant reproductive system: The cellular basis: …the male gametangia are called antheridia and the female oogonia or archegonia. A female gametangium with a sterile cellular jacket is called an archegonium, although, like an oogonium, it produces eggs. In most of the plants dealt with in this article, the eggs are produced in archegonia and the sperms…

  • antherozoid (plant anatomy)

    plant development: Preparatory events: …general, the male gametes (antherozoids) are produced in globose structures (antheridia) that are either stalked or sunken in the gametophyte. The antherozoids, always many in number, develop from mother cells enclosed in the jacket of the antheridium. Each antherozoid can move by using its whiplike hairs, or flagella, two…

  • anthesis (botany)

    Poaceae: Characteristic morphological features: …itself, peanutgrass burial begins before flowering.

  • Anthesteria (Greek festival)

    Anthesteria, one of the several Athenian festivals in honour of Dionysus, the wine god, held annually for three days in the month of Anthesterion (February–March) to celebrate the beginning of spring and the maturing of the wine stored at the previous vintage. On the first day (Pithoigia, or “Jar

  • Anthicidae (insect)

    Antlike flower beetle, any of the approximately 1,000 species of the insect family Anthicidae (order Coleoptera). They are usually seen around flowers, foliage, refuse, or dead wood. These voracious beetles resemble ants and range from 2 to 12 millimetres (up to 12 inch) in length. Some can be

  • Anthill: A Novel (novel by Wilson)

    Edward O. Wilson: …he released his debut novel, Anthill: A Novel, which featured both human and insect characters. Letters to a Young Scientist (2013) was a volume of advice directed at nascent scientific investigators.

  • Anthills of the Savannah (novel by Achebe)

    Chinua Achebe: …of the People (1966) and Anthills of the Savannah (1987) deal with corruption and other aspects of postcolonial African life.

  • Anthim of Trebizond (Byzantine patriarch)

    Anthimus I, Greek Orthodox patriarch of Constantinople (reigned 535–536), the last notable Byzantine churchman explicitly to advocate Monophysitism (see Monophysite). As bishop of Trebizond Anthimus participated in discussions at Constantinople in 532, to effect religious and political unity

  • Anthimos (patriarch of Jerusalem)

    Greece: The role of the Orthodox church: …views of men such as Anthimos, the patriarch of Jerusalem, who argued in 1798 that the Ottoman Empire was part of the divine dispensation granted by God to protect Orthodoxy from the taint of Roman Catholicism and of Western secularism and irreligion, were not unusual.

  • Anthimus I (Byzantine patriarch)

    Anthimus I, Greek Orthodox patriarch of Constantinople (reigned 535–536), the last notable Byzantine churchman explicitly to advocate Monophysitism (see Monophysite). As bishop of Trebizond Anthimus participated in discussions at Constantinople in 532, to effect religious and political unity

  • Anthimus of Iberia (Romanian bishop and writer)

    Anthimus of Iberia, metropolitan of Walachia (now part of Romania), linguist, typographer, and ecclesiastical writer who contributed greatly to the development of the Romanian language and literature by his translation and printing of biblical and liturgical texts and by his own writings on ethics

  • Anthimus VI (Eastern Orthodox patriarch)

    Anthimus VI, Eastern Orthodox patriarch of Constantinople who attempted to maintain his ecclesiastical authority over the rebellious Bulgarian Orthodox Church, and, with others, wrote an Orthodox encyclical letter repudiating Roman Catholic overtures toward reunion. In about 1840 Anthimus, a monk o

  • Anthimus VII Tsatsos (Eastern Orthodox patriarch)

    Anthimus VII Tsatsos, Eastern Orthodox patriarch of Constantinople (1895–96), theologian, orator, and a leading critic of the Roman Catholic Church. Like Anthimus VI, his predecessor of a half-century earlier, Anthimus VII is known for his encyclical letter to the Orthodox world refuting a papal

  • Anthoceros (plant genus)

    hornwort: The largest genus, Anthoceros, has a worldwide distribution. Dendroceros and Megaceros are mainly tropical genera. Hornworts have an ancient lineage and are thought to be some of the earliest plants to have evolved on land.

  • Anthocerotae (plant, division Anthocerotophyta)

    Hornwort, (division Anthocerotophyta), any of about 300 species of small nonvascular plants. Hornworts usually grow on damp soils or on rocks in tropical and warm temperate regions. The largest genus, Anthoceros, has a worldwide distribution. Dendroceros and Megaceros are mainly tropical genera.

  • Anthocerotales (plant order)

    bryophyte: Annotated classification: Order Anthocerotales Characteristics are those of the class; widely distributed in temperate to tropical latitudes, with greatest diversity in the tropics and subtropics; containing 1 family and 6 or 7 genera. Order Dendrocerotales Distributed primarily in tropical regions; containing 1 family with 4 genera, Dendroceros, Megaceros,…

  • Anthocerotidae (plant, division Anthocerotophyta)

    Hornwort, (division Anthocerotophyta), any of about 300 species of small nonvascular plants. Hornworts usually grow on damp soils or on rocks in tropical and warm temperate regions. The largest genus, Anthoceros, has a worldwide distribution. Dendroceros and Megaceros are mainly tropical genera.

  • Anthocerotophyta (plant, division Anthocerotophyta)

    Hornwort, (division Anthocerotophyta), any of about 300 species of small nonvascular plants. Hornworts usually grow on damp soils or on rocks in tropical and warm temperate regions. The largest genus, Anthoceros, has a worldwide distribution. Dendroceros and Megaceros are mainly tropical genera.

  • anthocorid bug (insect)

    Flower bug, (family Anthocoridae), any of at least 400 species of small insects in the true bug order, Heteroptera, that are black with white markings and are usually found on flowers, under loose bark, or in leaf litter. Flower bugs range in size from 2 to 5 mm (0.08 to 0.2 inch) in length. Their

  • Anthocoridae (insect)

    Flower bug, (family Anthocoridae), any of at least 400 species of small insects in the true bug order, Heteroptera, that are black with white markings and are usually found on flowers, under loose bark, or in leaf litter. Flower bugs range in size from 2 to 5 mm (0.08 to 0.2 inch) in length. Their

  • anthocyanin (biochemistry)

    Caryophyllales: Evolution: …presence of chemical compounds called anthocyanins; colours ranging from yellow to reddish orange are dependent on compounds called anthoxanthins. A distinct but parallel group of pigments, known as betalains (betacyanins and betaxanthins) occurs only in some families of Caryophyllales. Species that possess betalains never contain anthocyanins and vice versa. Because…

  • anthodite (geology)

    cave: Depositional materials and features: Another variety of speleothem, the anthodite, is a radiating cluster of needlelike crystals. Anthodites are usually composed of aragonite, which has a different habit (i.e., shape of individual crystal grains) than the more common variety of calcium carbonate, calcite. Layered bead or corallike forms occur on cave walls, and complex…

  • Anthologia Hellēnikē (Greek literature)

    Greek Anthology, collection of about 3,700 Greek epigrams, songs, epitaphs, and rhetorical exercises, mostly in elegiac couplets, that can be dated from as early as the 7th century bce to as late as 1000 ce. The nucleus of the Anthology is a collection made early in the 1st century bce by Meleager,

  • Anthologie des ma?tres religieux primitifs (work by Bordes)

    Charles Bordes: …also began publication of the Anthologie des ma?tres religieux primitifs, which provided choral societies with invaluable material. By 1905 he had moved to Montpellier, where he started a provincial branch of the Schola Cantorum.

  • Anthologion (liturgical book)

    Byzantine chant: In the Akolouthiai, or Anthologion, were ordinary chants for Vespers, Matins, funerals, and the three liturgies (of St. John Chrysostom, St. Basil, and the Preconsecrated Offerings), as well as optional chants, some of which were usable as bridges at any point in the liturgy, usually sung to single syllables…

  • anthology series (radio and television)

    radio: Anthology shows: Radio’s anthology shows featured casts and story lines that were entirely different from one week to the next. These shows provided a forum for some of radio’s brightest talents, whose abilities were too great to be confined to the more formulaic programs. Chief…

  • anthology show (radio and television)

    radio: Anthology shows: Radio’s anthology shows featured casts and story lines that were entirely different from one week to the next. These shows provided a forum for some of radio’s brightest talents, whose abilities were too great to be confined to the more formulaic programs. Chief…

  • Anthomedusae (cnidarian suborder)

    cnidarian: Annotated classification: Suborder Anthomedusae Medusae bell-shaped, with gonads on the stomach or sides of manubrium. Sensory structures consist of pigmented eyespots (ocelli). Skeleton, if present, lacks cup (hydrotheca) into which polyp may withdraw (a condition known as gymnoblastic); few species with calcareous exoskeleton. Most abundant in bays and…

  • anthomyiid fly (insect)

    Anthomyiid fly, (family Anthomyiidae), any of a group of common flies (order Diptera) that resemble the housefly in appearance. In most species the larvae feed on plants and can be serious pests. However, some are scavengers and live in excrement and decaying material, and others are aquatic. The

  • Anthomyiidae (insect)

    Anthomyiid fly, (family Anthomyiidae), any of a group of common flies (order Diptera) that resemble the housefly in appearance. In most species the larvae feed on plants and can be serious pests. However, some are scavengers and live in excrement and decaying material, and others are aquatic. The

  • Anthoniszoon van Riebeeck, Jan van (Dutch colonial administrator)

    Jan van Riebeeck, Dutch colonial administrator who founded (1652) Cape Town and thus opened Southern Africa for white settlement. Van Riebeeck joined the Dutch East India Company (Vereenigde Oost-indische Compagnie; commonly called VOC) as an assistant surgeon and sailed to Batavia in April 1639.

  • Anthoniszoon, Jeroen (Netherlandish painter)

    Hi?ronymus Bosch, brilliant and original northern European painter whose work reveals an unusual iconography of a complex and individual style. He was recognized as a highly imaginative “creator of devils” and a powerful inventor of seeming nonsense full of satirical and moralizing meaning. Bosch

  • Anthonomus grandis (insect)

    Boll weevil, (Anthonomus grandis), beetle of the insect family Curculionidae (order Coleoptera), a cotton pest in North America. Introduced to the United States from Mexico in the 1890s, the boll weevil was a severe agricultural pest for nearly 90 years, until the launch of an aggressive multiyear

  • Anthony (duke of Brabant)

    history of the Low Countries: The Burgundians: …1404, while his younger brother Anthony was given Brabant, where the childless Duchess Joanna had named him as her successor, which was accepted by the estates. Anthony’s branch of the Burgundians died out as early as 1430, so that Brabant fell to the other branch under Philip III the Good…

  • Anthony à Wood (English antiquarian)

    Anthony Wood, English antiquarian whose life was devoted to collecting and publishing the history of Oxford and its university. Wood’s historical survey of the University of Oxford and its various colleges was published as Historia et Antiquitates Universitatis Oxoniensis (1674; History and

  • Anthony Adverse (novel by Allen)

    Anthony Adverse, historical novel by Hervey Allen, published in 1933. A long, rambling work set in Europe, Africa, and the Americas during the Napoleonic era, Anthony Adverse relates the many adventures of the eponymous hero. These include slave trading in Africa, his experiences as a businessman

  • Anthony Adverse (film by LeRoy [1936])

    Mervyn LeRoy: At Warner Brothers in the 1930s: Little Caesar, I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang, and Gold Diggers of 1933: …given a prestige property with Anthony Adverse (1936), a hugely successful costume drama set in the 18th century and based on the Hervey Allen best seller. Fredric March starred as the globe-trotting hero, and the cast included Olivia de Havilland, Claude Rains, and Gale Sondergaard, who won the first Oscar…

  • Anthony III Studite (patriarch of Constantinople)

    Anthony III Studite, Greek Orthodox monk and patriarch of Constantinople (reigned 974–979) who advocated the church’s independence from the state. A theological writer, he collaborated in drawing up liturgical literature for Eastern Orthodox worship. A monk of the Studios monastery, Anthony became

  • Anthony Lagoon (Northern Territory, Australia)

    Anthony Lagoon, settlement, east-central Northern Territory, Australia, on the Barkly Tableland. Named for a permanent water hole in the course of Creswell Creek, sighted in 1878 by Ernest Favenc, it became an important watering point on a cattle route from Western Australia to Queensland. Anthony

  • Anthony Melissa (Byzantine monk)

    Anthony Melissa, Byzantine monk, author whose collection of teachings and maxims taken from Sacred Scripture, early Christian writers, and secular authors promoted a popular Greek Orthodox tradition of moral–ascetical practice. Anthony, whose surname is derived from the title of his chief work,

  • Anthony of Bourbon (king of Navarre)

    Anthony Of Bourbon, king of Navarre, duke of Vend?me, and father of Henry IV of France. Son of Charles of Bourbon, duke of Vend?me, he married (1548) Jeanne d’Albret, daughter of Henry II, king of Navarre; as sole heir, she brought her husband the title of king of Navarre. Anthony was involved

  • Anthony of Egypt, St. (Egyptian monk)

    St. Anthony of Egypt, ; feast day January 17), religious hermit and one of the earliest monks, considered the founder and father of organized Christian monasticism. His rule represented one of the first attempts to codify guidelines for monastic living. A disciple of St. Paul of Thebes, Anthony

  • Anthony of Kiev (Russian monk)

    Anthony of Kiev, founder of Russian monasticism through the introduction of the Greek Orthodox ideal of the contemplative life. Seeking a solitary life, Anthony became a monk about 1028 at the Greek Orthodox monastery of Esphigmenon on Mount Athos, in Greece. According to an account contained in

  • Anthony of Navarre (king of Navarre)

    Anthony Of Bourbon, king of Navarre, duke of Vend?me, and father of Henry IV of France. Son of Charles of Bourbon, duke of Vend?me, he married (1548) Jeanne d’Albret, daughter of Henry II, king of Navarre; as sole heir, she brought her husband the title of king of Navarre. Anthony was involved

  • Anthony of Novgorod (Russian archbishop)

    Anthony Of Novgorod, monk and archbishop of Novgorod, Russia (1211–c. 1231), noted for his political and commercial diplomacy with the West and for the earliest cultural and architectural chronicle of Constantinople (modern Istanbul) and a résumé of the Greek Orthodox liturgy at the basilica of

  • Anthony of Padua, St. (Portuguese friar)

    St. Anthony of Padua, ; canonized 1232; feast day June 13), Franciscan friar, doctor of the church, and patron of the poor. Padua and Portugal claim him as their patron saint, and he is invoked for the return of lost property. Anthony was born into a wealthy family and was raised in the church. He

  • Anthony of Pechersk (Russian monk)

    Anthony of Kiev, founder of Russian monasticism through the introduction of the Greek Orthodox ideal of the contemplative life. Seeking a solitary life, Anthony became a monk about 1028 at the Greek Orthodox monastery of Esphigmenon on Mount Athos, in Greece. According to an account contained in

  • Anthony of Tagrit (Syrian theologian and writer)

    Anthony Of Tagrit, Syrian Orthodox theologian and writer, a principal contributor to the development of Syriac literature and poetry. Originally from Tagrit, near Latakia, Syria, Anthony belonged to the part of the Eastern Syriac Church called the Jacobites, which had separated from the authority

  • Anthony the Great, St. (Egyptian monk)

    St. Anthony of Egypt, ; feast day January 17), religious hermit and one of the earliest monks, considered the founder and father of organized Christian monasticism. His rule represented one of the first attempts to codify guidelines for monastic living. A disciple of St. Paul of Thebes, Anthony

  • Anthony’s Nose (promontory, New York, United States)

    Westchester: …1,228 feet (374 metres) at Anthony’s Nose promontory in the northwest corner of the county. Many of its numerous lakes and streams are part of New York City’s water-supply system. The hilly country along the Hudson valley was the home of Washington Irving (at Tarrytown) and the locus of some…

  • Anthony, Carmelo (American basketball player)

    Carmelo Anthony, American professional basketball player who was one of the most prolific scorers in National Basketball Association (NBA) history. Anthony, who grew up in a high-crime neighbourhood in Baltimore, Maryland, was sent by his mother to school in western Virginia for a better learning

  • Anthony, Charles (American opera singer)

    Charles Anthony, (Calogero Antonio Caruso), American opera singer (born July 15, 1929, New Orleans, La.—died Feb. 15, 2012, Tampa, Fla.), was a durable tenor at the Metropolitan Opera (the Met), New York City. During a 57-year career (1954–2010), Anthony appeared there more times (2,928) than any

  • Anthony, Earl Roderick (American bowler)

    Earl Roderick Anthony, American professional bowler, who helped to make bowling a major television sport in the United States during the 1970s, when he was frequently a tournament finalist. He was the first bowler to earn more than $1 million in prizes. Unlike most professional bowlers, Anthony was

  • Anthony, Katharine (American biographer)

    Katharine Anthony, American biographer best known for The Lambs (1945), a controversial study of the British writers Charles and Mary Lamb. The greater portion of her work examined the lives of notable American women. A college teacher of geometry, Anthony was deeply interested in psychiatry.

  • Anthony, Katharine Susan (American biographer)

    Katharine Anthony, American biographer best known for The Lambs (1945), a controversial study of the British writers Charles and Mary Lamb. The greater portion of her work examined the lives of notable American women. A college teacher of geometry, Anthony was deeply interested in psychiatry.

  • Anthony, Kenny (prime minister of Saint Lucia)

    Saint Lucia: Independence: …the SLP, and its leader, Kenny Anthony, became prime minister. The Gros and Petit Pitons, two volcanic peaks in the bay near Soufrière, were collectively designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2004. The UWP regained power in the 2006 elections. After an electoral victory for the SLP in December…

  • Anthony, Marc (American singer and actor)

    Jennifer Lopez: In 2004 Lopez married singer Marc Anthony, and the couple appeared in El Cantante (2006), the biopic of salsa musician Hector Lavoe. Her later albums included Rebirth (2005); the Spanish-language Como ama una mujer (2007), which reached the number one spot on Billboard’s Latin album chart; Brave (2007); Love? (2011),…

  • Anthony, Mary (American dancer, teacher, and choreographer)

    Mary Anthony, American dancer, teacher, and choreographer (born Nov. 11, 1916, Newport, Ky.—died June 7, 2014, New York, N.Y.), established the Mary Anthony Dance Studio (1954) and the Mary Anthony Dance Theater (1956) after studying under such modern dance pioneers as Hanya Holm (whom she also

  • Anthony, Michael (American musician)

    Van Halen: May 8, 1955, Nijmegen), bassist Michael Anthony (b. June 20, 1955, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.), and lead singer David Lee Roth (b. October 10, 1955, Bloomington, Indiana). Later members were Sammy Hagar (b. October 13, 1947, Monterey, California), Gary Cherone (b. July 26, 1961, Malden, Massachusetts), and Wolfgang Van Halen (b.…

  • Anthony, Michael (West Indian author)

    Michael Anthony, West Indian author of novels, short stories, and travelogues about domestic life in his homeland of Trinidad. Written in a sparse style, his works were often coming-of-age stories featuring young protagonists from his native village of Mayaro. In the mid-1950s Anthony left Trinidad

  • Anthony, Susan B. (American suffragist)

    Susan B. Anthony, American activist who was a pioneer crusader for the women’s suffrage movement in the United States and was president (1892–1900) of the National Woman Suffrage Association. Her work helped pave the way for the Nineteenth Amendment (1920) to the Constitution, giving women the

  • Anthony, Susan Brownell (American suffragist)

    Susan B. Anthony, American activist who was a pioneer crusader for the women’s suffrage movement in the United States and was president (1892–1900) of the National Woman Suffrage Association. Her work helped pave the way for the Nineteenth Amendment (1920) to the Constitution, giving women the

  • Anthony, William Arnold (American physicist)

    William Arnold Anthony, physicist and pioneer in the teaching of electrical engineering in the United States. After studying at Brown (Providence, R.I.) and Yale universities, Anthony taught physics and chemistry at Antioch College, Yellow Springs, Ohio (1867–69); Iowa State Agricultural College,

  • Anthophoridae (bee family)

    bee: …for their elaborate nest structures; Anthophoridae (including carpenter bees and cuckoo bees), a large family that includes three subfamilies that were once considered to be subfamilies of Apidae; and Apidae (bumblebees, honeybees, and digger, or mining, bees).

  • anthophyllite (mineral)

    Anthophyllite, an amphibole mineral, a magnesium and iron silicate that occurs in altered rocks, such as the crystalline schists of Kongsberg, Nor., southern Greenland, and Pennsylvania. Anthophyllite is commonly produced by regional metamorphism of ultrabasic rocks. Because its fibres have a low

  • Anthophysis (protozoa)

    protomonad: …solitary Monas or the colonial Anthophysis, are oval and amoeboid with one to three flagella; they inhabit foul water and feces and also may be found in human and animal intestines. The choanoflagellates, which sometimes are placed in a separate order, have a food-catching collar surrounding a single flagellum. The…

  • Anthophyta (plant)

    Angiosperm, any of about 300,000 species of flowering plants, the largest and most diverse group within the kingdom Plantae. Angiosperms represent approximately 80 percent of all the known green plants now living. The angiosperms are vascular seed plants in which the ovule (egg) is fertilized and

  • Anthornis melanura (bird)

    bellbird: Anthornis melanura of New Zealand is a honeyeater (family Meliphagidae) that lives in virgin forest; both sexes sing in beautifully chiming choruses, and both sexes of this 23-cm (9-inch) bird are dark green in colour.

  • anthoxanthin (biochemistry)

    flavonoid: …of this group, notably the anthoxanthins, impart yellow colours, often to the petals of flowers. The anthocyanins are largely responsible for the red colouring of buds and young shoots as well as for the purple and purple-red colours of autumn leaves. Although no physiological functions have been definitely established for…

  • Anthoxanthum (plant)

    Sweet vernal grass, (Anthoxanthum odoratum), fragrant perennial grass in the family Poaceae, native to Eurasia and North Africa. Sweet vernal grass is sometimes grown as a lawn grass or houseplant for its sweet scent; the fragrant coumarin in the leaves is released when the grass is mown or cut.

  • Anthoxanthum odoratum (plant)

    Sweet vernal grass, (Anthoxanthum odoratum), fragrant perennial grass in the family Poaceae, native to Eurasia and North Africa. Sweet vernal grass is sometimes grown as a lawn grass or houseplant for its sweet scent; the fragrant coumarin in the leaves is released when the grass is mown or cut.

  • Anthozoa (class of cnidarians)

    cnidarian: (hydrozoans); Scyphozoa (scyphozoans); Anthozoa (anthozoans); and Cubozoa (cubozoans). All cnidarians share several attributes, supporting the theory that they had a single origin. Variety and symmetry of body forms, varied coloration, and the sometimes complex life histories of cnidarians fascinate layperson and scientist alike. Inhabiting all marine and some…

  • anthracene (chemical compound)

    Anthracene, a tricyclic aromatic hydrocarbon found in coal tar and used as a starting material for the manufacture of dyestuffs and in scintillation counters. Crude anthracene crystallizes from a high-boiling coal-tar fraction. It is purified by recrystallization and sublimation. Oxidation yields

  • anthracite (mineral)

    Anthracite, the most highly metamorphosed form of coal. It contains more fixed carbon (86 percent or greater on a dry, ash-free basis) than any other form of coal and the least amount of volatile matter (14 percent or less on a dry, ash-free basis), and it has calorific values near 35 megajoules

  • Anthracite Belt (geological formation, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Carboniferous Period: Pennsylvanian cyclothems, tillites, and turbidites: …Mammoth coal bed of the Anthracite Belt in eastern Pennsylvanian has an average thickness of 10–12 metres (35–40 feet) throughout its extent. The Pittsburgh seam in western Pennsylvania averages 4 metres (13 feet) thick and is reported workable over 15,540 square km (6,000 square miles). More than 60 coal seams…

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