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  • Anatolian religion

    Anatolian religion, beliefs and practices of the ancient peoples and civilizations of Turkey and Armenia, including the Hittites, Hattians, Luwians, Hurrians, Assyrian colonists, Urartians, and Phrygians. For historical background, see Anatolia. Until comparatively recent times, the pre-Christian

  • Anatolian rug

    rug and carpet: Turkey: After the 16th century, Turkish rugs either followed Persian designs—indeed, were possibly worked by immigrant Persians and Egyptians—or followed native traditions. The former, made on court looms, displayed exquisite cloud bands and feathery, tapering white leaves on grounds of pale rose relieved by blue and emerald green. Turkish patterns…

  • Anatolian Turkish language

    Transcaucasia: The people: Another Turkic language, Anatolian Turkish, is spoken in a few communities in Azerbaijan.

  • Anatom (island, Vanuatu)

    Anatom, southernmost inhabited island of Vanuatu, in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. Volcanic in origin, it has a circumference of 35 miles (56 km) and an area of 25 square miles (65 square km). It rises from a fertile coastal plain and valleys to a height of 2,795 feet (852 metres). Anatom was a

  • anatomic lesion (pathology)

    lesion: Lesions may be classified as anatomic (evident to the unaided senses), histologic (evident only under a microscope), or biochemical (evident only by chemical analysis). A typical gross anatomic lesion might be the solid tumour of a carcinoma of the colon, while the corresponding histological lesion would be the atypical cells…

  • Anatomical and Mechanical Lectures upon Dancing (work by Weaver)

    John Weaver: …physical aspects of dance in Anatomical and Mechanical Lectures upon Dancing (1721), in which he emphasized the need to understand human anatomy in order to use the body as a tool of expression. Weaver’s contributions helped to establish dance in England as a narrative form and a respected method of…

  • Anatomical Disquisition On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals, An (work by Harvey)

    blood group: Historical background: …et Sanguinis in Animalibus (The Anatomical Exercises Concerning the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals) in 1628. His discovery, that blood circulates around the body in a closed system, was an essential prerequisite of the concept of transfusing blood from one animal to another of the same…

  • Anatomical Dissertation Upon the Movement of the Heart and Blood in Animals, An (work by Harvey)

    blood group: Historical background: …et Sanguinis in Animalibus (The Anatomical Exercises Concerning the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals) in 1628. His discovery, that blood circulates around the body in a closed system, was an essential prerequisite of the concept of transfusing blood from one animal to another of the same…

  • Anatomical Exercise Concerning the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals, The (work by Harvey)

    blood group: Historical background: …et Sanguinis in Animalibus (The Anatomical Exercises Concerning the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals) in 1628. His discovery, that blood circulates around the body in a closed system, was an essential prerequisite of the concept of transfusing blood from one animal to another of the same…

  • Anatomical Exercises of Dr. William Harvey, The (work by Harvey)

    blood group: Historical background: …et Sanguinis in Animalibus (The Anatomical Exercises Concerning the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals) in 1628. His discovery, that blood circulates around the body in a closed system, was an essential prerequisite of the concept of transfusing blood from one animal to another of the same…

  • Anatomie menschlicher Embryonen (work by His)

    Wilhelm His: He was the author of Anatomie menschlicher Embryonen, 3 vol. (1880–85; “Human Embryonic Anatomy”), considered the first accurate and exhaustive study of the development of the human embryo.

  • Anatomie of Absurditie, The (work by Nashe)

    Thomas Nashe: In 1589 he wrote The Anatomie of Absurditie and the preface to Greene’s Menaphon. Both works are bold, opinionated surveys of the contemporary state of writing; occasionally obscure, they are euphuistic in style and range freely over a great variety of topics.

  • Anatomie of Abuses (work by Stubbs)

    Philip Stubbs: …life and straiter devotion whose Anatomie of Abuses (1583), his most popular work, consisted of a devastating attack on English habits in dress, food, drink, games, and especially sex. At first Stubbs was inclined to condemn only excessive concentration on worldly pastimes, but in later works he denounced all forms…

  • Anatomie pathologique du corps humain (work by Cruveilhier)

    Jean Cruveilhier: …an atlas of pathology titled Anatomie pathologique du corps humain, 2 vol. (1829–42; “Pathological Anatomy of the Human Body”), had many coloured illustrations whose beauty remains unrivaled in the history of medical illustration. In the Anatomie pathologique Cruveilhier gave the first description of multiple sclerosis, depicted several cases of gastric…

  • Anatomist, The (work by Bridie)

    James Bridie: …with his London production of The Anatomist (1931), based on a well-known criminal case. Considered distinctively Scottish in their unexpected twists of fancy and thought-provoking contents, his plays include Jonah and the Whale (1932); A Sleeping Clergyman (1933), also based on a criminal case; Marriage Is No Joke (1934); Colonel…

  • anatomy (biology)

    Anatomy, a field in the biological sciences concerned with the identification and description of the body structures of living things. Gross anatomy involves the study of major body structures by dissection and observation and in its narrowest sense is concerned only with the human body. “Gross

  • anatomy (literature)

    Anatomy, in literature, the separating or dividing of a topic into parts for detailed examination or analysis. Among the better-known examples are John Lyly’s Euphues: The Anatomy of Wit and Robert Burton’s Anatomy of Melancholy. The literary critic Northrop Frye, in his book Anatomy of Criticism,

  • Anatomy Act (United Kingdom [1832])

    body snatching: Until the enactment of the Anatomy Act of 1832 in Britain, the taking of corpses from graves was not itself illegal, as the corpse had no legal standing and was not owned by anyone. What was illegal was the dissection of the corpses and the theft of items other than…

  • Anatomy Lesson and Other Stories, The (work by Connell)

    Evan S. Connell: …published work, the critically acclaimed The Anatomy Lesson, and Other Stories (1957), are set in various regions of the United States and incorporate subject matter ranging from the near mythic to the mundane.

  • Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp, The (work by Rembrandt)

    Rembrandt van Rijn: Portraits: …some group portraits, such as The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp (1632). He must have conquered the Amsterdam portrait market rapidly. Partly relying on his experience as a history painter, he succeeded in producing much livelier portraits than those created by the specialized portrait painters who had dominated the…

  • Anatomy Lesson, The (novel by Roth)

    American literature: Realism and metafiction: …especially The Ghost Writer (1979), The Anatomy Lesson (1983), and, above all, The Counterlife (1987). Like many of his later works, from My Life as a Man (1974) to Operation Shylock (1993), The Counterlife plays ingeniously on the relationship between autobiography and fiction. His best later work was his bitter,…

  • Anatomy Lesson, The (work by Tetley)

    Glen Tetley: …with the Dutch company, including The Anatomy Lesson (1964), which was based on the 17th-century Dutch master Rembrandt’s painting Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp, and Embrace Tiger and Return to Mountain (1968), which incorporated movements from the ancient Chinese exercise T’ai Chi Ch’uan. Tetley became the codirector of the…

  • Anatomy of a Murder (film by Preminger [1959])

    Anatomy of a Murder, American courtroom film drama, released in 1959, that was controversial for its explicit handling of sexual passions and the crime of rape. The film was based on a novel by Robert Traver (pen name of Michigan Supreme Court Justice John D. Voelker). It centres on Paul Biegler

  • Anatomy of an Illness (work by Cousins)

    Norman Cousins: In 1979 Anatomy of an Illness appeared, a book based on Cousins’ own experience with a life-threatening illness and exploring the healing ability of the human mind. Later works include Human Options (1981), The Physician in Literature (1982), and The Pathology of Power (1987).

  • Anatomy of Criticism: Four Essays (work by Frye)

    Anatomy of Criticism: Four Essays, work of literary criticism by Northrop Frye, published in 1957 and generally considered the author’s most important work. In his introduction, Frye explains that his initial intention to examine the poetry of Edmund Spenser had given way in the process to a

  • Anatomy of Human Destructiveness, The (work by Fromm)

    biophilia hypothesis: American psychoanalyst Erich Fromm in The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness (1973), which described biophilia as “the passionate love of life and of all that is alive.” The term was later used by American biologist Edward O. Wilson in his work Biophilia (1984), which proposed that the tendency of humans to…

  • Anatomy of Melancholy, The (work by Burton)

    Anatomy of Melancholy, The, exposition by Robert Burton, published in 1621 and expanded and altered in five subsequent editions (1624, 1628, 1632, 1638, 1651/52). In the first part of the treatise, Burton defines the “inbred malady” of melancholy, discusses its causes, and sets down the symptoms.

  • Anatomy of Peace (work by Hamlisch)

    Marvin Hamlisch: In 1991 he composed Anatomy of Peace, a work for orchestra and chorus, inspired by the World War II-era book of the same name by Emery Reves. In a 2010 tribute to classical music and jazz, he collaborated with jazz trombonist Wycliffe Gordon and actress Angela Lansbury to produce…

  • Anatomy of Plants, The (work by Grew)

    Nehemiah Grew: …best and most popular work, The Anatomy of Plants (1682), includes a section on the anatomy of flowers and many excellent wood engravings that represent the three-dimensional, microscopic structure of plant tissue. The book is best remembered for the idea, suggested to Grew by the physician Sir Thomas Millington, that…

  • Anatomy of the Body of Christ (work by Godfrey of Saint-Victor)

    Godfrey of Saint-Victor: Another treatise, “Anatomy of the Body of Christ,” appended to Fons philosophiae, is a leading example of medieval Christian symbolism. A long poem ascribing to each member and organ of Christ’s body some aspect of man’s natural and supernatural purpose, it assembled texts from the early Church…

  • Anatomy of the Human Gravid Uterus, Exhibited in Figures, The (work by Hunter)

    William Hunter: …the most important being The Anatomy of the Human Gravid Uterus, Exhibited in Figures (1774).

  • Anatomy of Vegetables Begun, The (work by Grew)

    Nehemiah Grew: …first book on plant anatomy, The Anatomy of Vegetables Begun (1672), was presented to the Royal Society of London at the same time as Malpighi’s manuscript on the subject.

  • Anatosaurus (dinosaur genus)

    Anatosaurus, (genus Anatosaurus), bipedal duck-billed dinosaurs (hadrosaurs) of the Late Cretaceous Period, commonly found as fossils in North American rocks 70 million to 65 million years old. Related forms such as Edmontosaurus and Shantungosaurus have been found elsewhere in the Northern

  • anatta (Buddhism)

    Anatta, (Pali: “non-self” or “substanceless”) in Buddhism, the doctrine that there is in humans no permanent, underlying substance that can be called the soul. Instead, the individual is compounded of five factors (Pali khandha; Sanskrit skandha) that are constantly changing. The concept of anatta,

  • Anaukpetlun (king of Burma)

    Myanmar: The Toungoo dynasty, 1531–1752: …and by 1613 Bayinnaung’s grandson Anaukpetlun had reunited Myanmar. Anaukpetlun’s successor, Thalun, reestablished the principles of the Myanmar state created half a millennium earlier at Pagan. Heavy religious expenditures, however, weakened Ava politically, much as they had done in Pagan. In the meantime, southern Myanmar had been rejuvenated by the…

  • Anauni (people)

    Claudius: Administrative innovations: …(Lyon), the edict for the Anauni (an Alpine population who had usurped the rights of Roman citizenship and whom Claudius confirmed in these rights), and the aforementioned letter to the city of Alexandria (41 ce), survive as evidence of his personal style of government: pedantic, uninhibited, alternately humane and wrathful,…

  • anautogenous fly (insect)

    dipteran: Adults: …at all without blood are anautogenous. One species can have both types, possibly as a result of shifting populations or races arising from natural selection. For example, in the far north, large populations of biting flies (e.g., mosquitoes, biting midges, black flies, horse flies) occur during the short Arctic summer,…

  • anauxite (mineral)

    kaolinite: Anauxite, which was previously regarded as a kaolinite-group mineral possessing a higher than usual silica-alumina ratio, is now considered to be kaolinite and free silica (mainly noncrystalline). For chemical formula and detailed physical properties, see clay mineral (table).

  • Anavarza (Turkey)

    Anazarbus, former city of the ancient province of Cilicia in Anatolia that was important in the Roman and Byzantine periods. It was located in what is now south-central Turkey. The original native settlement was refounded by the Romans in 19 bc, following a visit by Augustus. It rivaled Tarsus, the

  • Anawrahta (king of Myanmar)

    Anawrahta, the first king of all of Myanmar, or Burma (reigned 1044–77), who introduced his people to Theravāda Buddhism. His capital at Pagan on the Irrawaddy River became a prominent city of pagodas and temples. During his reign Anawrahta united the northern homeland of the Burmese people with

  • Anaxagoras (Greek philosopher)

    Anaxagoras, Greek philosopher of nature remembered for his cosmology and for his discovery of the true cause of eclipses. He was associated with the Athenian statesman Pericles. About 480 Anaxagoras moved to Athens, then becoming the centre of Greek culture, and brought from Ionia the new practice

  • Anaxilas (tyrant of Rhegium)

    Messina: The fugitives were assisted by Anaxilas, tyrant of Rhegium (Reggio di Calabria), who then ruled over Rhegium and Zankle, the name of which he changed to Messene in honour of his native region of Messenia in the Peloponnese. After regaining its independence, the city was destroyed by the Carthaginian Himilco…

  • Anaximander (Greek philosopher)

    Anaximander, Greek philosopher who was the first to develop a cosmology, or systematic philosophical view of the world. Only a short fragment of Anaximander’s work survives, so reconstructions of his philosophy and astronomy must be based on summaries by later Greek writers, such as the 1st- or

  • Anaximenes of Miletus (Greek philosopher)

    Anaximenes Of Miletus , Greek philosopher of nature and one of three thinkers of Miletus traditionally considered to be the first philosophers in the Western world. Of the other two, Thales held that water is the basic building block of all matter, whereas Anaximander chose to call the essential

  • Anaxyelidae (insect)

    wood wasp: The cedar wood wasps, represented in North America by the species Syntexis libocedrii, are found in the Pacific coastal states. Adults are about 8 to 14 mm (0.3 to 0.5 inch) in length. The larva bores into the wood of the incense cedar, Calocedrus decurrens.

  • Anaya, Colegio de (building, Salamanca, Spain)

    Salamanca: …new cathedral stand the Neoclassical Colegio de Anaya (1760–68), designed by José Mamerto Hermosilla, and the only remaining old residential college, the Colegio de Fonseca (1527–78), generally known as the Colegio de los Irlandeses because it was ceded after the Peninsular War (1808–14) to the Irish as a seminary and…

  • Anaya, Jorge Isaac (Argentine naval commander)

    Jorge Isaac Anaya, Argentine naval commander (born Sept. 27, 1926, Bahía Blanca, Arg.—died Jan. 9, 2008, Buenos Aires, Arg.), led the failed attempt to invade and control the Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas) during the 1982 Falkland Islands War with the U.K. The decision to invade the Falklands by

  • Anaya, Rudolfo (American author)

    Rudolfo Anaya, American novelist and educator whose fiction expresses his Mexican American heritage, the tradition of folklore and oral storytelling in Spanish, and the Jungian mythic perspective. Anaya learned to speak English only when he started school. As a teen, he broke his back, and his

  • Anaya, Rudolfo A. (American author)

    Rudolfo Anaya, American novelist and educator whose fiction expresses his Mexican American heritage, the tradition of folklore and oral storytelling in Spanish, and the Jungian mythic perspective. Anaya learned to speak English only when he started school. As a teen, he broke his back, and his

  • Anaya, Rudolfo Alfonso (American author)

    Rudolfo Anaya, American novelist and educator whose fiction expresses his Mexican American heritage, the tradition of folklore and oral storytelling in Spanish, and the Jungian mythic perspective. Anaya learned to speak English only when he started school. As a teen, he broke his back, and his

  • Anazarbus (Turkey)

    Anazarbus, former city of the ancient province of Cilicia in Anatolia that was important in the Roman and Byzantine periods. It was located in what is now south-central Turkey. The original native settlement was refounded by the Romans in 19 bc, following a visit by Augustus. It rivaled Tarsus, the

  • Anbar (ancient city, Iraq)

    Anbar, ancient Mesopotamian town located on the left bank of the Euphrates River, downstream from modern Ar-Ramādī in central Iraq. Originally called Massice and Fairuz Sapur, it was destroyed by the Roman emperor Julian in ad 363. The town was rebuilt and became known from at least the 6th century

  • Anbār, battle of (Mesopotamian history)

    history of Mesopotamia: The Sāsānian period: …battle near Resaina, but at Anbār, renamed Pērōz-Shāpūr (“Victorious Is Shāpūr”), the Sāsānians inflicted a defeat on the Romans, who lost their emperor. His successor, Philip the Arabian, made peace, giving up Roman conquests in northern Mesopotamia. Osroene, however, which had been returned to the local ruling family of Abgar…

  • Anbay (Arabian deity)

    Arabian religion: South Arabia: In Qatabān, Anbay and ?awkam are invoked together as (the gods) “of command and decision(?).” The name Anbay is related to that of the Babylonian god Nabu, while ?awkam derives from the root meaning “to be wise.” They probably represent twin aspects (as Evening and Morning Star?)…

  • ANC (political party, South Africa)

    African National Congress (ANC), South African political party and black nationalist organization. Founded in 1912 as the South African Native National Congress, it had as its main goal the maintenance of voting rights for Coloureds (persons of mixed race) and black Africans in Cape Province. It

  • ANC Youth League (South African organization)

    Julius Malema: …was elected president of the ANC Youth League by a narrow majority during a contentious group conference.

  • Ancaeus (Greek mythology)

    Ancaeus, in Greek mythology, the son of Zeus or Poseidon and Astypalaea (daughter of Phoenix), and king of the Leleges of Samos. In the Argonautic expedition, after the death of Tiphys, the helmsman of the Argo, Ancaeus took his place. According to legend, while planting a vineyard, Ancaeus was

  • Ancash earthquake of 1970 (Peru)

    Ancash earthquake of 1970, earthquake that originated off the coast of Peru on May 31, 1970, and caused massive landslides. Approximately 70,000 people died. The epicentre of the earthquake was under the Pacific Ocean about 15 miles (25 km) west of Chimbote, a fishing port in the department of

  • Ancestor (Australian Aboriginal mythology)

    Australian literature: Aboriginal narrative: the oral tradition: …past (called up by the Ancestors) and part of the present.

  • ancestor mask

    mask: Social and religious uses: …members of secret societies wearing ancestor masks are reminders of the ancient sanction of their conduct. In many cultures, these masked ceremonies are intended to prevent miscreant acts and to maintain the circumscribed activities of the group. Along the Guinea coast of West Africa, for instance, many highly realistic masks…

  • ancestor spirit (religion)

    Micronesian culture: Religion: Ancestral spirits were often contacted in dreams and in the trances of spirit mediums, as were the high gods and other nonhuman spirits. They would give people information about the causes of diseases, deaths, and other misfortunes and would sometimes prescribe new medicines or new…

  • ancestor worship

    African religions: Ritual and religious specialists: Ancestors also serve as mediators by providing access to spiritual guidance and power. Death is not a sufficient condition for becoming an ancestor. Only those who lived a full measure of life, cultivated moral values, and achieved social distinction attain this status. Ancestors are thought…

  • Ancestor’s Tale, The (work by Dawkins)

    Richard Dawkins: The Ancestor’s Tale (2004), structured after Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, traced the human branch of the phylogenetic tree back to points where it converges with the evolution of other species. Further publications include The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution (2009), a…

  • ancestral estate (Anglo-American law)

    inheritance: Modern tendencies: …in the so-called rule of ancestral estate. In Anglo-American law the doctrine of ancestral estate was part of the Canons of Descent of real estate. It meant that if an intestate died without descendants, property that had come to him from ancestors should revert to the line whence it had…

  • Ancestral Pueblo culture (North American Indian culture)

    Ancestral Pueblo culture, prehistoric Native American civilization that existed from approximately ad 100 to 1600, centring generally on the area where the boundaries of what are now the U.S. states of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah intersect. The descendents of the Ancestral Pueblo

  • Ancestress, The (work by Grillparzer)

    Franz Grillparzer: Die Ahnfrau, written in the trochaic Spanish verse form, has many of the outward features of the then-popular “fate tragedy” (Schicksalsdrama), but the characters are themselves ultimately responsible for their own destruction. A striking advance was the swiftly written tragedy Sappho (1818). Here the tragic…

  • ancestrula (biology)

    moss animal: Budding: …budding originates from either a primary zooid (the ancestrula) or a statoblast. The ancestrula is formed by the metamorphosis of a sexually produced larva. New zooids bud from the ancestrula to produce colonies of definite shape and growth habit. In the phylactolaemates, the primitive zooids are cylindrical in form, and…

  • ancestry (kinship)

    Descent, the system of acknowledged social parentage, which varies from society to society, whereby a person may claim kinship ties with another. If no limitation were placed on the recognition of kinship, everybody would be kin to everyone else; but in most societies some limitation is imposed on

  • Anche le donne hanno perso la guerra (work by Malaparte)

    Curzio Malaparte: …during the Soviet occupation (Anche le donne hanno perso la guerra, performed 1954; “The Women Lost the War Too”). He also wrote the screenplay for a film, Il Cristo proibito (1951) and, in addition to other works, published a volume titled Racconti italiani (1957; “Italian Tales”). His complete works…

  • Anchieta, José de (Portuguese author and scholar)

    José de Anchieta, Portuguese Jesuit acclaimed as a poet, dramatist, and scholar. He is considered one of the founders of the national literature of Brazil and is credited with converting more than a million Indians. Anchieta came from a prominent Portuguese family and was even thought to be related

  • Anchisaurus (dinosaur genus)

    dinosaur: The first finds: …later they were identified as Anchisaurus. Even earlier (1800), large birdlike footprints had been noticed on sandstone slabs in Massachusetts. Pliny Moody, who discovered these tracks, attributed them to “Noah’s raven,” and Edward Hitchcock of Amherst College, who began collecting them in 1835, considered them to be those of some…

  • Anchises (Greek mythology)

    Anchises, in Greek legend, member of the junior branch of the royal family of Troy: While he was tending his sheep on Mount Ida, the goddess Aphrodite met him and, enamoured of his beauty, bore him Aeneas. For revealing the name of the child’s mother, Anchises was killed or struck blind by

  • anchor (nautical device)

    Anchor, device, usually of metal, attached to a ship or boat by a cable or chain and lowered to the seabed to hold the vessel in a particular place by means of a fluke or pointed projection that digs into the sea bottom. Ancient anchors consisted of large stones, basketfuls of stones, sacks filled

  • anchor (computer programming)

    computer programming language: HTML: HTML documents also contain anchors, which are tags that specify links to other Web pages. An anchor has the form <A HREF= “http://www.yangchang12.icu”> Encyclop?dia Britannica</A>, where the quoted string is the URL (universal resource locator) to which the link points (the Web “address”) and the text following it is…

  • anchor bend (knot)

    knot: The fisherman’s, or anchor, bend is an especially strong and simple knot that will not jam or slip under strain and can be untied easily. The knot is used to attach a rope to a ring, hook, anchor, or other object. It is made by taking…

  • anchor escapement (device)

    escapement: The anchor escapement, an improvement invented in England in the 17th century, works with a pendulum and allows much smaller arcs of swing than the verge escapement with a pendulum. In the anchor escapement the pallets are in the shape of an inverted anchor, lying in…

  • anchor ice

    ice in lakes and rivers: Ice particles: …loose, porous layer known as anchor ice. Conversely, if the water temperature then rises above the freezing point, the particles will become neutral and will not stick to one another, so that the flow will be merely one of solid particles in the flowing water. The slightly above-freezing water may…

  • Anchor Savings Bank (American corporation)

    Richard Parsons: …Anchor Savings Bank to form Dime Bancorp in 1995. In that same year Parsons was recruited as president of Time Warner, whose board he had joined in 1991. His elevation to CEO occurred in 2002 when it was evident that the Internet company America Online (AOL), which had recently acquired…

  • Anchorage (Alaska, United States)

    Anchorage, city (municipality), south-central Alaska, U.S. Lying at the base of the Chugach Mountains, it is a port at the head of Cook Inlet (a bay of the Pacific Ocean). In 1835 Russians established a mission across the inlet from the area that constitutes the modern city of Anchorage. After gold

  • anchoress (religion)

    hermit: …desert”) is used interchangeably with anchorite, although the two were originally distinguished on the basis of location: an anchorite selected a cell attached to a church or near a populous centre, while a hermit retired to the wilderness.

  • anchorite (religion)

    hermit: …desert”) is used interchangeably with anchorite, although the two were originally distinguished on the basis of location: an anchorite selected a cell attached to a church or near a populous centre, while a hermit retired to the wilderness.

  • Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues (film by McKay [2013])

    Will Ferrell: …satire The Campaign (2012); and Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues (2013). The production company was also behind Funny or Die (funnyordie.com), a Web site that first garnered notice with a short video of Ferrell being intimidated by his landlady, a beer-swigging potty-mouthed toddler.

  • Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy (film by McKay [2004])

    Will Ferrell: …string of hit comedies, notably Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy (2004) and the NASCAR spoof Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006), both of which he cowrote with McKay. In 2005 Ferrell portrayed a Nazi playwright in the musical comedy The Producers, and he played equally outlandish characters…

  • Anchors Aweigh (film by Sidney [1945])

    George Sidney: Bathing Beauty and Anchors Aweigh: …even bigger box-office hit with Anchors Aweigh (1945), which starred Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra as sailors on leave in Los Angeles who befriend an aspiring actress (Kathryn Grayson). The musical was especially noted for Kelly’s dancing duet with Jerry, the animated mouse; the sequence was a special-effects triumph. Sidney…

  • anchovy (fish)

    Anchovy, any of numerous schooling saltwater fishes of the family Engraulidae (order Clupeiformes) related to the herring and distinguished by a large mouth, almost always extending behind the eye, and by a pointed snout. Most of the more than 100 species live in shallow tropical or warm temperate

  • anchovy pear (plant)

    Anchovy pear, (Grias cauliflora), evergreen tree of the family Lecythidaceae, native to the West Indies. The tree is cultivated for its edible fruit. The plant grows to about 15 metres (50 feet) tall and bears spear-shaped, glossy leaves about 90 cm (35 inches) long that are produced in tufts at

  • Anchura (fossil snail genus)

    Anchura, genus of extinct marine gastropods (snails) found as fossils only in marine deposits of Cretaceous age (between 145.5 million and 65.5 million years old). It is thus a useful guide or index fossil because it is easily recognizable. The shell whorls are globular and ornamented with raised

  • Anchusa (plant genus)

    alkanet: …Mediterranean species of the genus Anchusa and the closely related Pentaglottis sempervirens, bearing blue, purple, or white flowers, similar to those of forget-me-nots, on hairy herbaceous stems. They belong to the family Boraginaceae. True alkanet (A. officinalis), also known as common bugloss, bears purple flowers in coiled sprays on

  • Anchusa azurea (plant)

    alkanet: Large blue alkanet (A. azurea), or Italian bugloss, is popular as a garden species and reaches 120 cm (4 feet) with narrow leaves and large bright-blue flowers tufted with white hairs in the throats. Oval pointed evergreen leaves and white-eyed blue flowers characterize the evergreen…

  • Anchusa officinalis (plant)

    alkanet: True alkanet (A. officinalis), also known as common bugloss, bears purple flowers in coiled sprays on narrow-leaved plants, 60 cm (2 feet) tall. Large blue alkanet (A. azurea), or Italian bugloss, is popular as a garden species and reaches 120 cm (4 feet) with narrow…

  • ancien régime (French history)

    Ancien régime, (French: “old order”) Political and social system of France prior to the French Revolution. Under the regime, everyone was a subject of the king of France as well as a member of an estate and province. All rights and status flowed from the social institutions, divided into three

  • Ancien Régime, L’? (work by Taine)

    Hippolyte Taine: Historical theories: The first volume, L’Ancien Régime (“The Old Regime”), appeared in 1876, followed by three volumes on the Revolution (1878–85). In 1878 he was also elected to the Académie Fran?aise.

  • Anciens Canadiens, Les (novel by Gaspé)

    Philippe Aubert de Gaspé: …wrote Les Anciens Canadiens (The Canadians of Old). A French Canadian classic, it is a romantic historical novel set in Canada at the time of the British conquest (1760). Its idealization of the “good old days,” the farmer’s loyalty to the soil, and distrust of English Canada influenced the…

  • Ancient & Modern: Hymns and Songs for Refreshing Worship (music collection)

    hymn: …dates from the publication of Hymns Ancient and Modern (1861; last rev. ed., 2013, as Ancient & Modern: Hymns and Songs for Refreshing Worship), characterized by austerity of style, conformity to the Anglican Book of Common Prayer, and the setting of each hymn to its proper tune.

  • Ancient Aiethopia (work by Sun Ra)

    Sun Ra: …among his early works, “Ancient Aiethopia” most successfully unites the diverse strands of his composing.

  • Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine (fraternal order)

    circus: History: …local groups such as the Shriners—also performed.

  • Ancient Architecture of England, The (work by Carter)

    Western architecture: From the 19th to the early 20th century: …was John Carter, author of The Ancient Architecture of England (1795 and 1807), in which Gothic details were more faithfully and accurately recorded than in any earlier publication. Thomas Rickman designated the various styles of medieval architecture in An Attempt to Discriminate the Styles of English Architecture (1817), and the…

  • Ancient Britons, The (work by Blake)

    William Blake: Blake’s exhibition (1809–10): …picture in the exhibition, called The Ancient Britons and depicting the last battle of the legendary King Arthur, had been commissioned by the Welsh scholar and enthusiast William Owen Pughe. The painting, now lost, was said to have been 14 feet (4.3 metres) wide by 10 feet (3 metres) tall—the…

  • Ancient Child, The (novel by Momaday)

    N. Scott Momaday: …he published his second novel, The Ancient Child, which weaves traditional tales and history with a modern urban Kiowa artist’s search for his roots. In the Presence of the Sun: Stories and Poems, 1961–1991 appeared in 1992, Circle of Wonder: A Native American Christmas Story in 1994, and The Man…

  • Ancient Chinese language

    Chinese languages: … (8th to 3rd century bc), Ancient (Middle) Chinese (through ad 907), and Modern Chinese (from c. the 10th century to modern times). The Proto-Sinitic period is the period of the most ancient inscriptions and poetry; most loanwords in Chinese were borrowed after that period. The works of Confucius and Mencius…

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