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  • American woodcock (bird)

    woodcock: The female American woodcock (Scolopax, or Philohela, minor) is about 28 cm (11 inches) long, including the bill. Her mate is slightly smaller. The wings are very rounded, and the outermost wing feathers are attenuated to produce vibratory sounds during flight, apparently at will. The male’s aerial…

  • American worm snake (reptile)

    worm snake: The American worm snake (Carphophis amoena), of the eastern United States, of the family Colubridae, is brown or blackish, with a pink belly. Adults usually are less than 25 cm (10 inches) long. The Oriental worm snakes of the genus Trachischium resemble the American species.

  • American yew (plant, Taxus canadensis)

    American yew, (Taxus canadensis), a prostrate, straggling evergreen shrub of the family Taxaceae, found in northeastern North America. American yew also is a lumber trade name for the Pacific yew. The American yew, the hardiest of the yew species, provides excellent ground cover in forested areas.

  • American yew (plant)

    Pacific yew, (Taxus brevifolia), an evergreen timber tree of the yew family (Taxaceae). It is the only commercially important yew native to North America, where it is found from Alaska to California. Usually between 5 and 15 metres (about 15 to 50 feet) tall, it sometimes reaches 25 metres. See

  • American, The (novel by James)

    The American, novel by Henry James, published serially in 1876 in The Atlantic Monthly and in book form a year later and produced as a four-act play in 1891. The American is the story of a self-made American millionaire, Christopher Newman, whose guilelessness and forthrightness are set in contrast

  • American, The (film by Corbijn [2010])

    George Clooney: …in Italy in the thriller The American (2010). He moved behind the camera again for the tense political drama The Ides of March (2011), casting himself as a presidential candidate in a cutthroat primary campaign.

  • American-British-Dutch-Australian Command (Australian-European-United States history)

    World War II: Pearl Harbor and the Japanese expansion, to July 1942: A unified American–British–Dutch–Australian Command, ABDACOM, under Wavell, responsible for holding Malaya, Sumatra, Java, and the approaches to Australia, became operative on January 15, 1942; but the Japanese had already begun their advance on the oil-rich Dutch East Indies. They occupied Kuching (December 17), Brunei Bay (January 6),…

  • Americana (album by Young)

    Neil Young: Later work and causes: …with Crazy Horse to record Americana (2012), a collection of ragged covers of traditional American folk songs. He teamed with singer-guitarist Lukas Nelson (son of country star Willie Nelson) and his band Promise of the Real to record both The Monsanto Years (2015), a protest against corporatism, and The Visitor…

  • Americana (Brazil)

    Americana, city, in the highlands of east-central S?o Paulo estado (state), Brazil. Americana lies near the Piracicaba River at 1,732 feet (528 metres) above sea level. It was settled in 1868 by immigrants from the former Confederate States of America. The settlement was made a seat of a

  • Americana (novel by DeLillo)

    Don DeLillo: His first novel, Americana (1971), is the story of a network television executive in search of the “real” America. It was followed by End Zone (1972) and Great Jones Street (1973). Ratner’s Star (1976) attracted critical attention with its baroque comic sense and verbal facility.

  • Americana (music genre)

    the Byrds: …progressive country aspirations inspired the alternative country movement led by Wilco and Son Volt.

  • Americanah (book by Adichie)

    Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: Americanah (2013) centres on the romantic and existential struggles of a young Nigerian woman studying (and blogging about race) in the United States.

  • Americanism (Roman Catholicism)

    Americanism, in Roman Catholic church history, a certain set of doctrinal proposals concerning the adaptation of the church to modern civilization that was reprobated by Pope Leo XIII in his apostolic letter Testem Benevolentiae of Jan. 22, 1899. The letter was written in response to a controversy

  • Americanization (sociology)

    Americanization, in the early 20th century, activities that were designed to prepare foreign-born residents of the United States for full participation in citizenship. It aimed not only at the achievement of naturalization but also at an understanding of and commitment to principles of American

  • Americanization of Emily, The (film by Hiller [1964])

    The Americanization of Emily, American comedy-drama film, released in 1964, that was noted for Paddy Chayefsky’s biting script about the absurdities of war. James Garner portrayed Charles Madison, a cowardly aide to an unstable admiral (played by Melvyn Douglas). Hoping to gain publicity for the

  • Americans (American baseball team)

    Boston Red Sox, American professional baseball team based in Boston. One of the most-storied franchises in American sports, the Red Sox have won nine World Series titles and 14 American League (AL) pennants. Founded in 1901, the franchise (then unofficially known as the Boston Americans) was one of

  • Americans for a Better Tomorrow, Tomorrow (American organization)

    Stephen Colbert: …political action committee (PAC) “Americans for a Better Tomorrow, Tomorrow.” The PAC was what is commonly known as a “Super PAC,” an organization that—in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2010 Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission decision—can accept unlimited contributions from individuals, corporations, or labour unions, which…

  • Americans for Democratic Action (American organization)

    Americans for Democratic Action (ADA), a liberal independent political organization in the United States. It was formed in 1947 by a group of labour leaders, civic and political leaders, and academics who were liberal in their views on national affairs, internationalist in world outlook, and

  • Americans for Prosperity Foundation (American political organization)

    Charles and David Koch: Politics: …Koch in 1977) and the Americans for Prosperity Foundation (originally Citizens for a Sound Economy, cofounded by David Koch in 1984)—generally favoured laissez-faire economic policies, significantly lower taxes, restrictions on the powers of unions, and the elimination or privatization of most public services and social welfare

  • Americans for Tax Reform (American organization)

    Mike Enzi: …pledge—created by the special-interest group Americans for Tax Reform, headed by Grover Norquist—in which politicians promised to curb taxation, especially at the federal level. Enzi continued to take a strong interest in energy issues, and he led legislative efforts to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and other public lands…

  • Americans with Disabilities Act

    By all odds it was not the biggest liability case in legal history, but the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) suit against Chicago-based AIC Security Investigations, Ltd., and its owner, Ruth Vrdolyak, was watched with consuming interest by the U.S. business community; it was the first

  • Americans with Disabilities Act (United States [1990])

    Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), U.S. legislation that provided civil rights protections to individuals with physical and mental disabilities and guaranteed them equal opportunity in public accommodations, employment, transportation, state and local government services, and

  • Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act (United States (2008))

    Americans with Disabilities Act: The ADA Amendments Act (ADAAA), which clarified and expanded several measures of the original law, was signed into law by Pres. George W. Bush in 2008 and went into effect at the beginning of 2009. The act rejected certain Supreme Court decisions that had altered the…

  • Americans, The (work by Frank)

    United States: The visual arts and postmodernism: Frank’s book The Americans (l956), the record of a tour of the United States that combined the sense of accident of a family slide show with a sense of the ominous worthy of the Italian painter Giorgio de Chirico, was the masterpiece of this vision; and no…

  • Americans, The (work by Boorstin)

    Daniel J. Boorstin: …civilization, notably his major work, The Americans, in three volumes: The Colonial Experience (1958), The National Experience (1965), and The Democratic Experience (1973; Pulitzer Prize, 1974).

  • Americas (continents)

    Americas, the two continents, North and South America, of the Western Hemisphere. The climatic zones of the two continents are quite different. In North America, subarctic climate prevails in the north, gradually warming southward and finally becoming tropical near the southern isthmus. In South

  • Americas, Copa de las (polo)

    polo: International competition.: …Copa de las Americas (Cup of the Americas) was contested between the United States and Argentina. Since then Argentina has become the uncontested master of international polo. Polo became the Argentine national game, and crowds exceeded 60,000. International matches commercially sponsored (mainly at Boca Raton, Fla.) were held in…

  • Americas, Cup of the (polo)

    polo: International competition.: …Copa de las Americas (Cup of the Americas) was contested between the United States and Argentina. Since then Argentina has become the uncontested master of international polo. Polo became the Argentine national game, and crowds exceeded 60,000. International matches commercially sponsored (mainly at Boca Raton, Fla.) were held in…

  • Americas, pony of the (breed of horse)

    Pony of the Americas, riding-pony breed used as a child’s mount, developed in the United States in the 1950s by crossing ponies with Appaloosa horses. To qualify for registration with the Pony of the Americas Club, a pony must have the dappled Appaloosa patterning and measure from 11.2 to 13.2

  • americium (chemical element)

    Americium (Am), synthetic chemical element (atomic number 95) of the actinoid series of the periodic table. Unknown in nature, americium (as the isotope americium-241) was artificially produced from plutonium-239 (atomic number 94) in 1944 by American chemists Glenn T. Seaborg, Ralph A. James, Leon

  • americium-241 (chemical isotope)

    transuranium element: Practical applications of transuranium isotopes: americium-241, and californium-252—have demonstrated substantial practical applications. One gram of plutonium-238 produces approximately 0.57 watt of thermal power, primarily from alpha-particle decay, and this property has been used in space exploration to provide energy for small thermoelectric-power units.

  • americium-242 (chemical isotope)

    transuranium element: Nuclear-shape isomers: , in 1962, americium-242 was produced in a new form that decayed with a spontaneous-fission half-life of 14 milliseconds, or about 1014 times shorter than the half-life of the ordinary form of that isotope. Subsequently, more than 30 other examples of this type of behaviour were found in…

  • americium-243 (chemical isotope)

    americium: …are radioactive; the stablest isotope, americium-243, has proved more convenient for chemical investigations because of its longer half-life (7,370 years, compared with 433 years for americium-241).

  • Americo-Liberian (people)

    Liberia: Ethnic groups and languages: …United States (known historically as Americo-Liberians) and the West Indies; and other black immigrants from neighbouring western African states who came during the anti-slave-trade campaign and European colonial rule. The Americo-Liberians are most closely associated with founding Liberia. Most of them migrated to Liberia between 1820 and 1865; continued migration…

  • Americorchestia longicornis (crustacean)

    sand flea: The long-horned sand flea (Americorchestia longicornis), which is found on the Atlantic coast of North America from New England to the Gulf of Mexico, is named for its antennae, which are as long as the body. The species, also known as the Atlantic sandhopper, grows to…

  • AmeriCorps (United States federal program)

    AmeriCorps, U.S. federal program that supports voluntary service in the areas of health, the environment, education, and public safety. It was created by the National and Community Service Trust Act of 1993, which also established the Corporation for National and Community Service, an independent

  • AmeriCorps Education Award (United States federal program)

    AmeriCorps: …1997 the introduction of the AmeriCorps Education Award—a postservice grant for educational expenses such as tuition and repaying student loans—helped to increase individual participation in AmeriCorps and enabled more organizations to benefit from the program. By the end of the first decade of the 21st century, AmeriCorps had grown to…

  • AmeriCorps NCCC (United States federal program)

    AmeriCorps: …public-health and job-training programs, (2) AmeriCorps NCCC (National Civilian Community Corps, modeled on the Great Depression-era Civilian Conservation Corps), a full-time residential program in which volunteers living on several regional campuses work with various organizations and agencies on team-based service projects in their region, and (3) AmeriCorps State and National,…

  • AmeriCorps State and National (United States federal program)

    AmeriCorps: …in their region, and (3) AmeriCorps State and National, which awards funding to service organizations and agencies to recruit, place, and supervise AmeriCorps participants.

  • AmeriCorps VISTA (American organization)

    Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA), American governmental organization (created 1964) that placed volunteers throughout the United States to help fight poverty through work on community projects with various organizations, communities, and individuals. Among the related issues addressed by

  • Americus (Georgia, United States)

    Americus, city, seat (1831) of Sumter county, southwest-central Georgia, U.S., on Muckalee Creek, 35 miles (55 km) north of Albany. Founded in 1830, it was named for the Italian explorer and navigator Amerigo Vespucci or, legend says, for the “merry cusses” who were its first settlers. To the

  • Ameridelphia (marsupial superorder)

    marsupial: Classification: Superorder Ameridelphia (American opossums) 75 or more species in 2 orders. Order Didelphimorphia (opossums) 70 or more species in 1 family found in Central and South America, except for the Virginia opossum, which ranges as far north as southern Canada. Many species with unusual adaptations.

  • Amerika (novel by Kafka)

    Amerika, unfinished novel by Franz Kafka, written between 1912 and 1914 and prepared for publication by Max Brod in 1927, three years after the author’s death. The manuscript was entitled Der Verschollene (“The Lost One”). Kafka had published the first chapter separately under the title Der Heizer

  • Amerika Samoa (territory, Pacific Ocean)

    American Samoa, unincorporated territory of the United States consisting of the eastern part of the Samoan archipelago, located in the south-central Pacific Ocean. It lies about 1,600 miles (2,600 km) northeast of New Zealand and 2,200 miles (3,500 km) southwest of the U.S. state of Hawaii. The

  • Amerika-Müde, Der (work by Kürnberger)

    Ferdinand Kürnberger: Among these works are Der Amerika-Müde (1855; “The One Who Is Tired of America”), a roman à clef about Nikolaus Lenau, a popular figure of the time; Der Haustyrann (1876; “The House Tyrant”); Das Schloss der Frevel (1904; “Frevel’s Castle”); and two books of essays, Siegelringe (1874; “Signet Rings”)…

  • Amerikanische Freund, Der (film by Wenders [1977])

    Wim Wenders: Der amerikanische Freund (1977; The American Friend), based on Patricia Highsmith’s Ripley’s Game, explores the concept of dislocation, or separation. For this film, Wenders cast his longtime idol, film director Nicholas Ray, and the two later collaborated on the documentary Lightning over Water (1980), about the last days of…

  • AmeriKKKa’s Most Wanted (album by Ice Cube)

    Ice Cube: Solo career: His first solo album, AmeriKKKa’s Most Wanted, was released in 1990. A majority of the production was done by rap group Public Enemy’s production team, The Bomb Squad, while members from Ice Cube’s new crew, Da Lench Mob, made vocal appearances on the album. All told, the album was…

  • Amerind (people)

    American Indian, member of any of the aboriginal peoples of the Western Hemisphere. Eskimos (Inuit and Yupik/Yupiit) and Aleuts are often excluded from this category, because their closest genetic and cultural relations were and are with other Arctic peoples rather than with the groups to their

  • Amerindian (people)

    American Indian, member of any of the aboriginal peoples of the Western Hemisphere. Eskimos (Inuit and Yupik/Yupiit) and Aleuts are often excluded from this category, because their closest genetic and cultural relations were and are with other Arctic peoples rather than with the groups to their

  • Ameriprise Financial, Inc. (American company)

    American Express Company: …(spun off in 2005 as Ameriprise Financial, Inc.).

  • Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    Amersfoort, gemeente (municipality), central Netherlands, on the Eem (formerly Amer) River. The site (the name means “ford on the Amer”) was fortified in the 12th century. Its medieval street pattern and some old walls remain, as does the Koppelpoort (a water gate dating from about 1400 and

  • Amersham (England, United Kingdom)

    Amersham, town (parish), Chiltern district, administrative and historic county of Buckinghamshire, southeastern England. It lies in the valley of the River Misbourne, about 5 miles (8 km) northwest of the Greater London conurbation. The wide High Street of the old town is flanked by half-timbered

  • Amerval, Nicolas d’ (French aristocrat)

    Gabrielle d'Estrées, duchess de Beaufort: …marriage for her with Nicolas d’Amerval (June 1592; annulled 1594), but this formality did not prevent him from publicly acknowledging her as his mistress in December 1592. Indeed, Henry was often accused of compromising his victories in order to visit her. She had his entire confidence and influenced him in…

  • Amery Ice Shelf (ice shelf, Antarctica)

    Amery Ice Shelf, large body of floating ice, in an indentation in the Indian Ocean coastline of Antarctica, west of the American Highland. It extends inland from Prydz and MacKenzie bays more than 200 miles (320 km) to where it is fed by the Lambert Glacier. The region in which the ice shelf is

  • Amery, L. S. (British politician)

    L.S. Amery, British politician who was a persistent advocate of imperial preference and tariff reform and did much for colonial territories. He is also remembered for his part in bringing about the fall of the government of Neville Chamberlain in 1940. Amery was educated at Harrow and at Balliol

  • Amery, Leopold Charles Maurice Stennett (British politician)

    L.S. Amery, British politician who was a persistent advocate of imperial preference and tariff reform and did much for colonial territories. He is also remembered for his part in bringing about the fall of the government of Neville Chamberlain in 1940. Amery was educated at Harrow and at Balliol

  • Ames (Iowa, United States)

    Ames, city, Story county, central Iowa, U.S., on the South Skunk River, about 30 miles (50 km) north of Des Moines. It was laid out in 1865 and was originally called College Farm but was renamed the following year for Oakes Ames, a railroad financier and Massachusetts congressman. The railroad,

  • Ames process (chemistry)

    uranium processing: History: …produced by means of the Ames process, developed by the American chemist F.H. Spedding and his colleagues in 1942 at Iowa State University, Ames. In this process, the metal is obtained from uranium tetrafluoride by thermal reduction with magnesium.

  • Ames Room (psychological test)

    anamorphosis: …of anamorphosis is the so-called Ames Room, in which people and objects are distorted by manipulation of the contours of the room in which they are seen. This and other aspects of anamorphosis received a good deal of attention in the 20th century from psychologists interested in perception.

  • Ames test (biochemistry)

    Bruce Ames: The Ames test: Ames owed much of his celebrity to the Ames test. The test targets chemical mutagens, the agents that tend to increase the frequency or extent of genetic mutation. The test was rapid and inexpensive, and thus it was more effective for initial mutagenicity…

  • Ames, Adelaide (American astronomer)

    supercluster: American astronomers Harlow Shapley and Adelaide Ames introduced a catalog that showed the distributions of galaxies brighter than 13th magnitude to be quite different north and south of the plane of the Milky Way Galaxy. Their study was the first to indicate that the universe might contain substantial regions that…

  • Ames, Adelbert, Jr. (American psychologist)

    perception: Effects of perceptual assumptions: Psychologists Adelbert Ames, Jr., and Egon Brunswik proposed that one perceives under the strong influence of his learned assumptions and inferences, these providing a context for evaluating sensory data (inputs). In keeping with enrichment theory, Brunswik and Ames contended that sensory stimuli alone inherently lack some…

  • Ames, Aldrich (American spy)

    Aldrich Ames, American official of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) who was entrusted with discovering Soviet spies and who himself became one of the most successful double agents for the Soviet Union and Russia. The son of a CIA analyst, Ames attended the University of Chicago for two

  • Ames, Aldrich Hazen (American spy)

    Aldrich Ames, American official of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) who was entrusted with discovering Soviet spies and who himself became one of the most successful double agents for the Soviet Union and Russia. The son of a CIA analyst, Ames attended the University of Chicago for two

  • Ames, Bruce (American biochemist and geneticist)

    Bruce Ames, American biochemist and geneticist who developed the Ames test for chemical mutagens. The test, introduced in the 1970s, assessed the ability of chemicals to induce mutations in the bacterium Salmonella typhimurium. Because of its sensitivity to carcinogenic (cancer-causing) human-made

  • Ames, Fisher (American author and politician)

    Fisher Ames, American essayist and Federalist politician of the 1790s who was an archopponent of Jeffersonian democracy. After graduating from Harvard College in 1774, Ames taught school for five years before turning to law, and in 1781 he was admitted to the bar. Supporting the drive for a new,

  • Ames, Jessie Daniel (American activist)

    Jessie Daniel Ames, American suffragist and civil rights activist who worked successfully to combat lynching in the southern United States. Jessie Daniel grew up in several small Texas communities and graduated from Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas, in 1902. Her husband, Roger Ames,

  • Ames, Leon (American actor)

    Meet Me in St. Louis: Cast: Assorted Referencesdiscussed in biography

  • Ames, Leslie (British cricketer)

    Leslie Ames, one of the outstanding all-round English cricketers. At the age of 17 Ames became a batsman for Kent; he became a wicketkeeper in 1927. He began playing in test matches in 1929, and in 1931–38 he was the first-choice keeper for England. His finest season was in 1933, during which he

  • Ames, Leslie Ethelbert George (British cricketer)

    Leslie Ames, one of the outstanding all-round English cricketers. At the age of 17 Ames became a batsman for Kent; he became a wicketkeeper in 1927. He began playing in test matches in 1929, and in 1931–38 he was the first-choice keeper for England. His finest season was in 1933, during which he

  • Ames, Louise Bates (American psychologist)

    Louise Bates Ames, child psychologist instrumental in the fields of child and human development. Ames was best known for helping recognize the distinct and predictable stages of growth and change that children and infants progress through and for educating parents about these phenomena. Ames

  • Ames, Maria del Rosario Casas Dupuy (American spy)

    Aldrich Ames: …he met his second wife, Maria del Rosario Casas Dupuy, a Colombian he recruited to work for the CIA. They married in 1985, while he was based again at CIA headquarters near Washington, D.C.; he was posted to Rome in 1986–89.

  • Ames, Oakes (American businessman and politician)

    Oakes Ames, leading figure in the Crédit Mobilier scandal following the U.S. Civil War. Ames left school at age 16 to enter his father’s shovel company, Oliver Ames & Sons. Assuming progressively more responsible positions in the firm, he eventually took over management of the company (along with

  • Ames, Preston (American art director and designer)
  • Ames, William (English theologian)

    William Ames, English Puritan theologian remembered for his writings on ethics and for debating and writing in favour of strict Calvinism in opposition to Arminianism. As a student at Cambridge, Ames viewed cardplaying as an offense to Christian living—no less serious than profanity. In 1609 his

  • Ames, Winthrop (American theatrical producer and director)

    Winthrop Ames, American theatrical producer, manager, director, and occasional playwright known for some of the finest productions of plays in the United States during the first three decades of the 20th century. Though his interests lay in the theatre, to please his family Ames entered the

  • Amesbury (England, United Kingdom)

    Amesbury, town (parish), administrative and historic county of Wiltshire, southern England. It is situated in the southern part of the Salisbury Plain, in the valley of the River Avon (East, or Hampshire, Avon). The region is rich in prehistoric remains, including Stonehenge, 1.5 miles (2.5 km)

  • Amesbury (Massachusetts, United States)

    Amesbury, town (township), Essex county, northeastern corner of Massachusetts, U.S. It lies on the Merrimack River at the New Hampshire border. Settled in 1642 as part of Salisbury, it was named for Amesbury, England, became a separate precinct in 1654, and was incorporated as a township in 1668.

  • amesha spenta (Zoroastrianism)

    Amesha spenta, (Avestan: “beneficent immortal”) in Zoroastrianism, any of the six divine beings or archangels created by Ahura Mazdā, the Wise Lord, to help govern creation. Three are male, three female. Ministers of his power against the evil spirit, Ahriman, they are depicted clustered about

  • ametabolous metamorphosis (biology)

    metamorphosis: …the pattern of structural changes: ametabolous, hemimetabolous, and holometabolous. In ametabolous development there is simply a gradual increase in the size of young until adult dimensions are attained. This kind of development occurs in the silverfish, springtail, and other primitive insects. In more advanced insects (e.g., grasshoppers, termites, true bugs)…

  • amethyst (mineral)

    Amethyst, a transparent, coarse-grained variety of the silica mineral quartz that is valued as a semiprecious gem for its violet colour. Its physical properties are those of quartz, but it contains more iron oxide (Fe2O3) than any other variety of quartz, and experts believe that its colour arises

  • Ametistov, Ernest Mikhailovich (Russian jurist)

    Ernest Mikhailovich Ametistov, Russian judge who from 1991 was a member of the Constitutional Court, Russia’s highest court, and as such was a liberal champion of human rights and democratic freedoms (b. May 17, 1934, Leningrad, U.S.S.R.--d. Sept. 7, 1998, near Moscow,

  • Ameto, L’ (work by Boccaccio)

    Giovanni Boccaccio: Early works.: …to 1345 he worked on Il ninfale d’Ameto (“Ameto’s Story of the Nymphs”), in prose and terza rima; L’amorosa visione (“The Amorous Vision”; 1342–43), a mediocre allegorical poem of 50 short cantos in terza rima; the prose Elegia di Madonna Fiammetta (1343–44); and the poem Il ninfale fiesolano (perhaps 1344–45;…

  • Ametrus tibialis (insect)

    raspy cricket: …cricket (Cooraboorama canberrae), and the thick-legged raspy cricket (Ametrus tibialis). A species belonging to the genus Glomeremus is endemic to the wet forests on the Mascarene Islands in the Indian Ocean. This particular raspy cricket is known to act as a pollinator for the orchid Angraecum cadetii; it is the…

  • Ameura (trilobite genus)

    Ameura, genus of trilobites (extinct arthropods) found as fossils in North America rocks dating from the Late Carboniferous to the Late Permian Period (from 318 million to 251 million years ago). Ameura is characterized by a well-developed cephalon (head) and a long pygidium (tail region) that

  • Amex (finance)

    NYSE Amex Equities, major U.S. stock exchange that also handles trades in options, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), corporate bonds, and other investment vehicles. Trading on NYSE Amex Equities—originally known as the “Curb” (because its transactions took place outdoors during much of its

  • Ameya (Korean tilemaker)

    pottery: Azuchi-Momoyama period (1573–1600): A tilemaker named Ameya, who is said to have been a Korean, introduced a type of ware that was covered with a lead glaze and fired at a comparatively low temperature. His son Tanaka Chōjirō and his family extended this technique to the teabowl, and in about 1588…

  • Amfilokhia (Greece)

    Gulf of árta: The town of Amfilokhía lies at the southeast corner of the gulf.

  • Amfiparnaso, L’? (work by Vecchi)

    Orazio Vecchi: …best known for his madrigal-comedy L’Amfiparnaso and other entertainment music.

  • Amfípolis (Greece)

    Amphipolis: …by the modern town of Amfípolis.

  • ámfissa (Greece)

    Amphissa, agricultural centre, Central Greece (Modern Greek: Stereá Elláda) periféreia (region), northern Greece. Amphissa lies at the northwestern limit of the fertile Crisaean plain, between the Gióna Mountains and the Parnassus massif. The economy includes trade in wheat, livestock, and

  • Amgun River (river, Russia)

    Amur River: Physiography: include the Zeya, Bureya, and Amgun rivers, which enter on the left bank from Siberia, the Sungari (Songhua) River entering on the right from China, and the Ussuri (Wusuli) River, which flows northward along China’s eastern border with Siberia until, just after entering Russia, it joins the Amur at Khabarovsk…

  • Amhara (people)

    Amhara, people of the Ethiopian central highlands. The Amhara are one of the two largest ethnolinguistic groups in Ethiopia (the other group being the Oromo). They constitute more than one-fourth of the country’s population. The Amharic language is an Afro-Asiatic language belonging to the

  • Amhara Plateau (region, Ethiopia)

    Amhara Plateau, montane region of northern and central Ethiopia, the historical home of the Amhara and Tigre peoples. Itself a part of the larger Ethiopian Plateau, it is composed, north to south, of the Tigray Plateau, centred on the city of Aksum; the Simien Mountains, northeast of Gonder; the

  • Amharic language

    Amharic language, one of the two main languages of Ethiopia (along with the Oromo language). It is spoken principally in the central highlands of the country. Amharic is an Afro-Asiatic language of the Southwest Semitic group and is related to Ge?ez, or Ethiopic, the liturgical language of the

  • Amharinya language

    Amharic language, one of the two main languages of Ethiopia (along with the Oromo language). It is spoken principally in the central highlands of the country. Amharic is an Afro-Asiatic language of the Southwest Semitic group and is related to Ge?ez, or Ethiopic, the liturgical language of the

  • Amherst (Massachusetts, United States)

    Amherst, town (township), Hampshire county, west-central Massachusetts, U.S. It lies in the Connecticut River valley just northeast of Northampton. It includes the communities of North Amherst, Amherst, and South Amherst. The town of Hadley adjoins it on the west. Settled as part of Hadley in the

  • Amherst (Myanmar)

    Kyaikkami, resort town, southeastern Myanmar (Burma). It is situated on a peninsula about 30 miles (48 km) south of the town of Moulmein. Originally a settlement of the Mon peoples, modern Kyaikkami was founded by the British during the annexation of Tenasserim and Arakan states after the First B

  • Amherst College (college, Amherst, Massachusetts, United States)

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