You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.

Historians, GAR-LEI

This general category includes a selection of more specific topics.
Back To Historians Page

Historians Encyclopedia Articles By Title

Garcilaso de la Vega
Garcilaso de la Vega, the first major poet in the Golden Age of Spanish literature (c. 1500–1650). Garcilaso was born into an aristocratic family that had been prominent in Spanish letters and politics for several centuries. Entering court life at an early age, he distinguished himself as a...
Gardiner, Samuel Rawson
Samuel Rawson Gardiner, English historian, whose career was dedicated to the study of the English Civil Wars. He was educated at Winchester and Christ Church, Oxford, and for some years was a member of the Irvingite Church. From 1871 to 1885 he taught at King’s College, London, becoming professor...
Garneau, Fran?ois-Xavier
Fran?ois-Xavier Garneau, first outstanding French-Canadian historian, known as the father of Canadian historiography. The son of a carriage maker, Garneau left school at the age of 14 and entered the court clerk’s office and two years later a notary’s firm, becoming a notary himself in 1830. He was...
Geijer, Erik Gustaf
Erik Gustaf Geijer, Swedish poet, historian, philosopher, and social and political theorist who was a leading advocate, successively, of the conservative and liberal points of view. A trip to England directly after his university days made a great impression on Geijer and gave him political insight...
Genesius, Joseph
Joseph Genesius, Byzantine scholar whose history of Constantinople is one of the few known sources on the relatively obscure 9th-century period of Byzantine history. The details of Genesius’ life are unknown. He apparently composed his history between 945 and 959 at the order of Emperor Constantine...
Genovese, Eugene D.
Eugene D. Genovese, American historian. He earned a doctorate at Columbia University and taught at Rutgers, Columbia, Cambridge, and elsewhere. He is known for his writings on the American Civil War and slavery, especially Roll, Jordan, Roll (1974) and The Slaveholders’ Dilemma (1992). He advanced...
George the Monk
George the Monk, Byzantine historian, author of a world chronicle that constitutes a prime documentary source for mid-9th-century Byzantine history, particularly the iconoclast (Greek: “image destroyer”) movement. George’s chronicle records events from the Creation to the reign of the emperor...
George the Syncellus
George The Syncellus, Byzantine historian and author of a world chronicle of events from the creation to the reign of the Roman emperor Diocletian (reigned 284–305). Together with the parallel work by Eusebius of Caesarea, George’s work constitutes the prime instrument for interpreting Christian...
Gerlache, étienne-Constantin, baron de
étienne-Constantin, baron de Gerlache, Belgian Catholic statesman and historian and a parliamentary leader in the first years of the Belgian kingdom established in 1830. He helped Leopold of Saxe-Coburg become the first king of the Belgians as Leopold I in 1831. After practicing law in Paris under...
Geyl, Pieter
Pieter Geyl, Dutch historian whose works on the Netherlands are highly respected both for their wealth of information and for their scholarly, incisive critical analysis. Geyl became interested in history after entering the University of Leiden, where, during his last year there (1911), he became...
Giannone, Pietro
Pietro Giannone, Italian historian whose works opposed papal interference in Naples. Giannone graduated in law (Naples, 1698), became interested in the “New Learning,” and wrote the Istoria civile del regno di Napoli (1723; The Civil History of the Kingdom of Naples)—a polemical survey of...
Gibbon, Edward
Edward Gibbon, English rationalist historian and scholar best known as the author of The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776–88), a continuous narrative from the 2nd century ce to the fall of Constantinople in 1453. Gibbon’s grandfather, Edward, had made a considerable fortune...
Giesebrecht, Wilhelm von
Wilhelm von Giesebrecht, German historian, author of the first general history of medieval Germany based on modern critical methods, and a student of Leopold von Ranke. In 1857 Giesebrecht became professor at K?nigsberg and in 1862 succeeded Heinrich von Sybel at Munich. In Geschichte der deutschen...
Gildas, Saint
Gildas, British historian of the 6th century. A monk, he founded a monastery in Brittany known after him as St. Gildas de Rhuys. His De excidio et conquestu Britanniae (“The Overthrow and Conquest of Britain”), one of the few sources for the country’s post-Roman history, contains the story of the ...
Giovanni da Pian del Carpini
Giovanni Da Pian Del Carpini, Franciscan friar, first noteworthy European traveller in the Mongol Empire, to which he was sent on a formal mission by Pope Innocent IV. He wrote the earliest important Western work on Central Asia. Giovanni was a contemporary and disciple of St. Francis of Assisi. ...
Giraldus Cambrensis
Giraldus Cambrensis, archdeacon of Brecknock, Brecknockshire (1175–1204), and historian, whose accounts of life in the late 12th century stand as a valuable historical source. His works contain vivid anecdotes about the Christian church, particularly in Wales, about the growing universities of ...
Giry, Arthur
Arthur Giry, French historian noted for his studies of the French Middle Ages. After a brief career in administrative services and journalism, Giry devoted himself to scholarship. His first major work was Histoire de la ville de Saint-Omer et de ses institutions jusqu’au XIVe siècle (1877). The...
Glycas, Michael
Michael Glycas, Byzantine historian, theologian, and poet, author of a world chronicle and learned theological works. Little is known of Glycas’s life except that he probably came from the island of Corfu, lived in Constantinople, and was blinded by order of Emperor Manuel I in 1159, apparently...
Godwin, Francis
Francis Godwin, bishop and historian who wrote the first story of space travel in English literature, The Man in the Moone: or A Discourse of a Voyage Thither by Domingo Gonsales, the Speedy Messenger. The tale was begun in about 1603–06 and finished around 1621–30; it was published in 1638. By...
Goldman, Eric Frederick
Eric Frederick Goldman, American historian, author, and special advisor to President Lyndon B. Johnson from 1963 to 1966. Goldman, who earned a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md. at 22 years of age, served as a lecturer there (1938–41) and as a Time magazine staff writer before...
Gooch, George Peabody
George Peabody Gooch, English historian of modern diplomacy, and one of the first writers in English on German history from the 18th century. During a brief political career Gooch specialized in foreign affairs and criticized the policy that led to the South African War. He was a Liberal member of...
Goodwin, Doris Kearns
Doris Kearns Goodwin, American author and historian known for her highly regarded presidential studies. In 1964 Kearns received a bachelor’s degree from Colby College, Waterville, Maine, and in 1968 she earned a doctorate in government from Harvard University, where she later taught government. In...
Gourgaud, Gaspard
Gaspard Gourgaud, French soldier and historian who accompanied Napoleon Bonaparte into exile at St. Helena and wrote important historical and biographical works about Napoleon. Gourgaud rose through the ranks of the French imperial army, was wounded a number of times, and apparently saved Napoleon...
Graetz, Heinrich
Heinrich Graetz, German author of a major history of the Jews that became the first standard work in the field. Greatly influenced by his studies with the renowned scholar Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch, Graetz became a teacher at the Breslau (now Wroc?aw, Pol.) seminary in 1854. The seminary taught a...
Green, Alice Stopford
Alice Stopford Green, Irish historian, supporter of Irish independence. She lived in London from 1874, and in 1877 she married the historian John Richard Green. After his death in 1883, her home became a centre for such diverse Londoners as Florence Nightingale and Winston Churchill. Mrs. Green’s...
Gregoras, Nicephorus
Nicephorus Gregoras, Byzantine humanist scholar, philosopher, and theologian whose 37-volume Byzantine History, a work of erudition, constitutes a primary documentary source for the 14th century. Having gained the favour of the emperor Andronicus II Palaeologus (1282–1328) and of ecclesiastics in...
Gregory of Tours, Saint
St. Gregory of Tours, ; feast day November 17), bishop and writer whose Ten Books of Histories (often wrongly called The History of the Franks) is the major 6th-century source for studying the Merovingian kingdom of the Franks. Gregory’s Gallo-Roman family was prominent in both religious and...
Grote, George
George Grote, English historian, noted for his works on ancient Greece. At the age of 16 Grote joined his father’s bank in London and worked in it until 1843, using his spare time to perfect his command of Greek and to learn German, economics, and philosophy. From 1832 to 1841 he was a member of...
Grotius, Hugo
Hugo Grotius, Dutch jurist and scholar whose masterpiece De Jure Belli ac Pacis (1625; On the Law of War and Peace) is considered one of the greatest contributions to the development of international law. Also a statesman and diplomat, Grotius has been called the “father of international law.”...
Groulx, Lionel-Adolphe
Lionel-Adolphe Groulx, Canadian priest and historian who for 50 years strongly influenced the Quebec nationalist movement. The son of a lumberjack, Groulx became a seminarian at Sainte-Thérèse-de-Blaineville and Montreal and was ordained a Roman Catholic priest in 1903. After teaching at a seminary...
Grundtvig, N. F. S.
N.F.S. Grundtvig, Danish bishop and poet, founder of Grundtvigianism, a theological movement that revitalized the Danish Lutheran church. He was also an outstanding hymn writer, historian, and educator and a pioneer of studies on early Scandinavian literature. After taking a degree in theology...
Guicciardini, Francesco
Francesco Guicciardini, Florentine statesman, diplomat, and historian, author of the most important contemporary history of Italy, Storia d’Italia. Guicciardini was born of an aristocratic Florentine family that played a prominent role under Lorenzo de’ Medici (the Magnificent). From 1498 to 1505...
Guizot, Fran?ois
Fran?ois Guizot, French political figure and historian who, as leader of the conservative constitutional monarchists during the July Monarchy (1830–48), was the dominant minister in France. Guizot’s father was executed by the National Convention in 1794, and Guizot went into exile with his mother....
Hall, Edward
Edward Hall, English historian whose chronicle was one of the chief sources of William Shakespeare’s history plays. Educated at Eton and at King’s College, Cambridge, Hall became common sergeant of London in 1533 and undersheriff in 1535. He was also a member of Parliament for Wenlock (1529) and...
Halévy, élie
élie Halévy, French historian, author of the best detailed general account of 19th-century British history, Histoire du peuple anglais au XIXe siècle, 6 vol. (1913–47; A History of the English People in the Nineteenth Century). This great work traces the political, economic, and religious...
Hamdānī, al-
Al-Hamdānī, Arab geographer, poet, grammarian, historian, and astronomer whose chief fame derives from his authoritative writings on South Arabian history and geography. From his literary production al-Hamdānī was known as the “tongue of South Arabia.” Most of al-Hamdānī’s life was spent in Arabia...
Handlin, Oscar
Oscar Handlin, American historian and educator noted for his examinations of immigration and other social topics in American history. The son of Jewish immigrant parents, Handlin graduated from Brooklyn College in 1934 and earned his M.A. degree from Harvard University in 1935. He then taught...
Hanotaux, Gabriel
Gabriel Hanotaux, statesman, diplomat, and historian who directed a major French colonial expansion in Africa and who championed a Franco-Russian alliance that proved important in the events leading to World War I. Trained as an archivist-historian, Hanotaux joined the faculty of the école des...
Harnack, Adolf von
Adolf von Harnack, German theologian and historian; he was recognized also for his scientific endeavours. In such seminal works as The History of Dogma (1886–89; 4th ed. 1909) and The History of Ancient Christian Literature (1893–1904), he argued that the relevance of Christianity to the modern...
Haskins, Charles Homer
Charles Homer Haskins, American educator and a leading medievalist of his generation, known for his critical studies of Norman institutions and the transmission of Greco-Arabic learning to the West. After receiving his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, in 1890, Haskins taught at the...
Hazard, Paul
Paul Hazard, French educator, historian of ideas, and scholar of comparative literature. Hazard studied at the école Normale Supérieure (“Superior Normal School”) in Paris and took a doctorate at the Sorbonne in 1910. He taught comparative literature at the University of Lyon until 1919, when he...
Hearne, Thomas
Thomas Hearne, English historian and antiquarian whose editions of English medieval chronicles were important sources for subsequent historians. Educated at St. Edmund Hall, Oxford, Hearne acted as assistant librarian of Oxford’s Bodleian Library between 1699 and 1715 and did much to index and...
Hegesippus
Hegesippus, supposed author of a free Latin adaptation of the Jewish War of Josephus, under the title De bello Judaico et excidio urbis Hierosolymitanae. The seven books of Josephus are compressed into five, but much has been added from the Antiquities of the Jews, also by Josephus, and from the...
Hellanicus of Lesbos
Hellanicus of Lesbos, Greek historian whose work marks an advance in the development of historiography. Hellanicus lived for some time at the court of one of the kings of Macedonia and in Athens. Some 30 works (of which fragments survive) are attributed to him, including Hiereiai tes Heras en Argei...
Helmold of Bosau
Helmold Of Bosau, German historian and priest who wrote Chronica Slavorum (Chronicle of the Slavs). Completed in about 1172, this work was a history of the lower Elbe River region from about 800 to 1170. Educated at Brunswick (1139–42) under Gerold (later bishop of Oldenburg and Lübeck) and at the...
Henne am Rhyn, Otto
Otto Henne am Rhyn, journalist and historian whose comprehensive universal cultural history was a major contribution to the development of the German Kulturgeschichte (History of Civilization) school. After studying at the Swiss universities of Bern and Geneva, he taught German, geography, and...
Herodotus
Herodotus, Greek author of the first great narrative history produced in the ancient world, the History of the Greco-Persian Wars. Scholars believe that Herodotus was born at Halicarnassus, a Greek city in southwest Asia Minor that was then under Persian rule. The precise dates of his birth and...
Herrera, Fernando de
Fernando de Herrera, lyric poet and man of letters who was one of the leading figures in the first School of Sevilla (Seville), a group of 16th-century Spanish neoclassic poets and humanists who were concerned with rhetoric and the form of language. Although never ordained, Herrera took minor...
Hesychius of Miletus
Hesychius Of Miletus , Byzantine historian and literary biographer whose chronicle of world history influenced later Byzantine historical accounts and provided singular data on the history of Constantinople. His works are also a valuable source for the history of Greek literature. A native of...
Hj?rne, Harald Gabriel
Harald Gabriel Hj?rne, historian, politician, and political writer known for his influence on Swedish historical scholarship and for his contributions to Swedish conservative and right-wing liberal thought. After studying at the University of Uppsala, Hj?rne joined the faculty there in 1872. His...
Hobsbawm, Eric John Ernest
neotraditionalism: Contested traditions: Thus, the British historian Eric Hobsbawm described the invention and deployment of neotraditions surrounding the mythic hero Ossian, bagpipes, and kilts in constructing a new Scottish national identity in the 18th century at a time of rapid class transformation, urbanization, and the decline of feudal forms of social solidarity.…...
Hofstadter, Richard
Richard Hofstadter, U.S. historian whose popular books on the political, social, and intellectual trends in U.S. history garnered two Pulitzer Prizes. He studied at the University of Buffalo (B.A., 1937) and Columbia University (M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1942). From 1942 to 1946 he taught at the...
Holberg, Ludvig, Friherre Holberg
Ludvig Holberg, Baron Holberg, the outstanding Scandinavian literary figure of the Enlightenment period, claimed by both Norway and Denmark as one of the founders of their literatures. Orphaned as a child, Holberg lived with relatives in Bergen until the city was destroyed by fire in 1702, when he...
Home, John
John Home, Scottish dramatist whose play Douglas, according to the poet Thomas Gray, “retrieved the true language of the stage.” Home entered the church, then fought against the Jacobites in the 1745 uprising led by Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie). When his play Douglas was produced...
Hooft, Pieter Corneliszoon
Pieter Corneliszoon Hooft, Dutch dramatist and poet, regarded by many as the most brilliant representative of Dutch Renaissance literature. Hooft’s prose style continued to provide a model into the 19th century. During three years spent in France and Italy, Hooft came completely under the spell of...
Hout, Jan van
Jan van Hout, Humanist, translator, historian, and poet, who was the first Dutch Renaissance figure to distinguish himself from his contemporaries in the field of literary theory. He foresaw the line of development that European literature was to take and wrote from the first in the iambic metre....
Huang Zongxi
Huang Zongxi, one of the foremost Chinese scholars and reformers in the early Qing dynasty (1644–1911/12), whose major contribution was a critique of the excessive authoritarianism of the Chinese political system. Study of his works was revived by Chinese reformers around the beginning of the 20th...
Huizinga, Johan
Johan Huizinga, Dutch historian internationally recognized for his Herfsttij der middeleeuwen (1919; The Waning of the Middle Ages). Huizinga was educated at the universities of Groningen and Leipzig. After teaching history in Haarlem and lecturing in Indian literature at Amsterdam, he was...
Hume, David
David Hume, Scottish philosopher, historian, economist, and essayist known especially for his philosophical empiricism and skepticism. Hume conceived of philosophy as the inductive, experimental science of human nature. Taking the scientific method of the English physicist Sir Isaac Newton as his...
Ibn al-Athīr
Ibn al-Athīr, influential Arab historian. Ibn al-Athīr spent a scholarly life in Mosul, but often visited Baghdad. He was for a time with Saladin’s army in Syria and later lived in Aleppo and Damascus. His chief work was a history of the world, al-Kāmil fī al-tārīkh (“The Complete History”),...
Ibn Khaldūn
Ibn Khaldūn, the greatest Arab historian, who developed one of the earliest nonreligious philosophies of history, contained in his masterpiece, the Muqaddimah (“Introduction”). He also wrote a definitive history of Muslim North Africa. Ibn Khaldūn was born in Tunis in 1332; the Khaldūniyyah quarter...
Ibn Miskawayh
Ibn Miskawayh, Persian scientist, philosopher, and historian whose scholarly works became models for later generations of Islamic thinkers. Little is known of Ibn Miskawayh’s personal life. It is believed he converted to Islam from Zoroastrianism, the religion of pre-Islamic Iran. His interests...
Idelsohn, Abraham Zevi
Abraham Zevi Idelsohn, Jewish cantor, composer, founder of the modern study of the history of Jewish music, and one of the first important ethnomusicologists. Trained as a cantor from childhood, Idelsohn later studied music in Berlin and Leipzig. Before emigrating to Jerusalem in 1905, he was a...
Iorga, Nicolae
Nicolae Iorga, scholar and statesman, Romania’s greatest national historian, who also served briefly as its prime minister (1931–32). Appointed professor of universal history at Bucharest (1895), Iorga early established his historical reputation with his two-volume Geschichte des rum?nischen Volkes...
Jacobs, Joseph
Joseph Jacobs, Australian-born English folklore scholar, one of the most popular 19th-century adapters of children’s fairy tales. He was also a historian of pre-expulsion English Jewry (The Jews of Angevin England, 1893), a historian of Jewish culture (Studies in Jewish Statistics, 1891), and a...
Janssen, Johannes
Johannes Janssen, Roman Catholic German historian who wrote a highly controversial history of the German people, covering the period leading to and through the Reformation. Reared in a staunchly Catholic home, he attended local schools and then studied at Münster, the Catholic University of Leuven...
Jean le Bel
Jean Le Bel, the forerunner of the great medieval Flemish chroniclers and one of the first to abandon Latin for French. A soldier and the constant companion of Jean, Count de Beaumont, with whom he went to England and Scotland in 1327, Le Bel wrote his Vrayes Chroniques (“True Chronicles”),...
Jien
Jien, learned Buddhist monk and poet who became the first great Japanese historian. Born into the highest order of the powerful, aristocratic Fujiwara family, he early in life entered a monastery of the Tendai Buddhist sect, first taking the priestly name Dōkai and later the name Jien. He soon...
John VI Cantacuzenus
John VI Cantacuzenus, statesman, Byzantine emperor, and historian whose dispute with John V Palaeologus over the imperial throne induced him to appeal for help to the Turks, aiding them in their conquest of the Byzantine Empire. John was chief adviser to Andronicus III Palaeologus, having helped...
Jordanes
Jordanes, historian notable for his valuable work on the Germanic tribes. Jordanes was a Goth who, although not a scholar, devoted himself to writing history in Latin. His first major work, De origine actibusque Getarum (“On the Origin and Deeds of the Getae”), now commonly referred to as the...
Josephus, Flavius
Flavius Josephus, Jewish priest, scholar, and historian who wrote valuable works on the Jewish revolt of 66–70 and on earlier Jewish history. His major books are History of the Jewish War (75–79), The Antiquities of the Jews (93), and Against Apion. Flavius Josephus was born of an aristocratic...
Jovanovi?, Slobodan
Slobodan Jovanovi?, Serbian jurist, historian, and statesman, prime minister in the Yugoslav government-in-exile during World War II (January 11, 1942–June 26, 1943). Liberal in his social and political views, he was perhaps Yugoslavia’s greatest authority on constitutional law; also a master of...
Joveynī, ?A?ā Malek
?A?ā Malek Joveynī, Persian historian. Joveynī was the first of several brilliant representatives of Persian historiography who flourished during the period of Mongol domination in Iran (1220–1336). Born into a well-known and highly respected family of governors and civil servants, Joveynī gained...
Jovius, Paulus
Paulus Jovius, Italian historian, author of vivid historical works in Latin, and the owner of a famous art collection. In about 1513 Jovius settled in Rome; he won the favour of Leo X (who compared him to Livy) and of Cardinal Giulio de’ Medici, later Clement VII, whom he helped during the sack of...
Karamzin, Nikolay Mikhaylovich
Nikolay Mikhaylovich Karamzin, Russian historian, poet, and journalist who was the leading exponent of the sentimentalist school in Russian literature. From an early age, Karamzin was interested in Enlightenment philosophy and western European literature. After extensive travel in western Europe,...
Kellogg, Louise Phelps
Louise Phelps Kellogg, American historian who wrote extensively on the American Northwest. Kellogg graduated from Milwaukee Female College (later Milwaukee-Downer College and now part of Lawrence University) in 1882. After several years of teaching in private schools, she entered the University of...
Kemalpa?azade
Kemalpa?azade, historian, poet, and scholar who is considered one of the greatest Ottoman historians. Born into an illustrious military family, as a young man he served in the army of ?brahim Pa?a, vezir (minister) to Sultan Bayezid II. He later studied under several famous religious scholars and...
Kennan, George F.
George F. Kennan, American diplomat and historian best known for his successful advocacy of a “containment policy” to oppose Soviet expansionism following World War II. Upon graduation from Princeton in 1925, Kennan entered the foreign service. He was sent overseas immediately and spent several...
Khwāndamīr, Ghiyās ad-Dīn Mu?ammad
Ghiyāth al-Dīn Mu?ammad Khwāndamīr, Persian historian, considered one of the greatest historians of the Timurid period. Grandson of the Persian historian Mirkhwānd, Khwāndamīr entered the service of Badī? al-Zamān, the eldest son of the Timurid ruler of Herāt, ?usayn Bāyqarā. Khwāndamīr was an...
Klyuchevsky, Vasily Osipovich
Vasily Osipovich Klyuchevsky, Russian historian whose sociological approach to the study of Russia’s past and lively writing and lecturing style made him one of the foremost scholars of his time. The son of a poor village priest, Klyuchevsky attended a seminary school before transferring to the...
Knighton, Henry
Henry Knighton, English chronicler and an Austin (Augustinian) canon at the Abbey of St. Mary of the Meadows in Leicester. He is important for his vivid picture of the religious reformer John Wycliffe and the rise of the Lollards and for his favourable account of the generally unpopular John of...
Knolles, Richard
Richard Knolles, English historian who is known chiefly for a study of the Turks. After graduation from Oxford University in 1564 or 1565, Knolles received an M.A. there in 1570 and continued in residence as a fellow in 1571. Shortly thereafter he became master of the secondary school at Sandwich,...
Kog?lniceanu, Mihail
Mihail Kog?lniceanu, Romanian statesman and reformer, one of the founders of modern Romanian historiography, who became the first premier of Romania, formed by the union of the Danubian principalities Moldavia and Walachia. In 1840 Kog?lniceanu undertook the publication of a national literary...
Kolakowski, Leszek
Leszek Kolakowski, Polish philosopher and historian of philosophy who became one of Marxism’s greatest intellectual critics. Kolakowski was educated privately and in the underground school system during the German occupation of Poland in World War II. In 1950 he received an M.A. in philosophy from...
Kuhn, Thomas S.
Thomas S. Kuhn, American historian of science noted for The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962), one of the most influential works of history and philosophy written in the 20th century. Kuhn earned bachelor’s (1943) and master’s (1946) degrees in physics at Harvard University but obtained...
Katip ?elebi
Katip ?elebi, Turkish historian, geographer, and bibliographer. Katip became an army clerk and took part in many campaigns in the east, meanwhile collecting material for his historical works. As a child he was taught the Qur?ān and Arabic grammar and calligraphy, but his later education was ...
La Farina, Giuseppe
Giuseppe La Farina, Italian revolutionary, writer, and leader and historian of the Risorgimento. The son of a Sicilian magistrate and scholar, La Farina received a law degree in 1835 and soon became involved with a secret committee for Italian unity; he was forced into exile after it attempted an...
Lacretelle, Jean-Charles-Dominique de, the Younger
Jean-Charles-Dominique de Lacretelle, the Younger, French historian and journalist, a pioneer in the historical study of the French Revolution. Summoned in 1787 to Paris by his older brother Pierre, a lawyer and political activist, he became a member of the Feuillants, a party advocating a...
Lamartine, Alphonse de
Alphonse de Lamartine, French poet, historian, and statesman who achieved renown for his lyrics in Méditations poétiques (1820), which established him as one of the key figures in the Romantic movement in French literature. In 1847 his Histoire des Girondins became widely popular, and he rose to...
Lamprecht, Karl Gotthard
Karl Gotthard Lamprecht, German historian who was one of the first scholars to develop a systematic theory of psychological factors in history. He studied history, political science, economics, and art at the universities of G?ttingen, Leipzig, and Munich (1874–79). In 1878 he completed his...
Langlois, Charles-Victor
Charles-Victor Langlois, one of the leading French scholars of the late 19th century, who is best known for his bibliographic and historical studies of medieval France. Langlois received his doctorate in 1887 and was named lecturer at the faculty of letters of Douai. In 1909 he became a professor...
Langtoft, Peter
Peter Langtoft, author of an Anglo-Norman chronicle in alexandrines, canon of the Augustinian priory at Bridlington. He took his name from the village of Langtoft in East Yorkshire. It is known that he acted as procurator for the prior or chapter (1271–86), but he later seems to have been in...
Lappenberg, Johann Martin
Johann Martin Lappenberg, German archivist who was also a prolific scholar of German and English history. Lappenberg was intended for his father’s profession, medicine, and studied in Edinburgh and London, where he conceived the ambition of entering British politics or serving in that country’s...
Las Casas, Bartolomé de
Bartolomé de Las Casas, early Spanish historian and Dominican missionary who was the first to expose the oppression of indigenous peoples by Europeans in the Americas and to call for the abolition of slavery there. His several works include Historia de las Indias (first printed in 1875). A prolific...
Las Cases, Emmanuel, comte de
Emmanuel, count de las Cases, French historian best known as the recorder of Napoleon’s last conversations on St. Helena, the publication of which contributed greatly to the Napoleonic legend in Europe. An officer of the royal navy, Las Cases in 1790 emigrated from France to England, where he wrote...
Laurent, Fran?ois
Fran?ois Laurent, Belgian administrator, legal scholar, and historian noted as the author of a monumental universal history and a series of comprehensive works on civil law. After gaining his degree in law in 1832, he served as the head of a division at the Belgian Ministry of Justice and in 1836...
Le Goff, Jacques
purgatory: Development of the tradition: According to the French historian Jacques Le Goff, the conception of purgatory as a physical place dates to the 12th century, the heyday of medieval otherworld-journey narratives and of pilgrims’ tales about St. Patrick’s Purgatory, a cavelike entrance to purgatory on a remote island in northern Ireland. As late as…...
Lecky, William Edward Hartpole
William Edward Hartpole Lecky, Irish historian of rationalism and European morals whose study of Georgian England became a classic. Lecky was educated at Kingstown, Armagh, at Cheltenham, and at Trinity College, Dublin. His early works, Religious Tendencies of the Age (1860) and Leaders of Public...
Lefebvre, Georges
Georges Lefebvre, French historian noted for his studies of various aspects of the French Revolution. Lefebvre’s major work, Les Paysans du Nord pendant la Révolution fran?aise (1924; “The Peasants of the North During the French Revolution”), was the result of 20 years of research into the role of...
Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm
Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, German philosopher, mathematician, and political adviser, important both as a metaphysician and as a logician and distinguished also for his independent invention of the differential and integral calculus. Leibniz was born into a pious Lutheran family near the end of the...

Historians Encyclopedia Articles By Title

Black Friday Sale! Premium Membership is now 50% off!
Learn More!
港台一级毛片免费观看